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Table Of Contents

The Indian Problem and Education
Colonial Period
U.S. Government Funded Indian Education
Student Demographics
Research Questions
The Student Recruitment Model
Table 3. Model-based enrollment criteria
Indian Education
Indian education
Indian Boarding Schools
Previous Research
The Twelfth United States Census, 1900
Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, 1875 - 1920
Data Acquisition and Retrieval
Database Transcription
Criticisms and Limitations
Chapter IV - Results
Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute
Carlisle Indian Industrial School
Chemawa Indian Industrial School (Harrison Institute)
Lincoln Institution
Chilocco Indian Agricultural School (Haworth Institute)
Genoa Indian Industrial School (Grant Institute)
Albuquerque Indian Industrial School (Fisk Institute)
Haskell Institute
Grand Junction Indian Industrial School (Teller Institute)
Santa Fe Indian Industrial School (Dawes Institute)
Fort Mojave Indian Industrial School (Herbert Welsh Institute)
Carson Indian Industrial School (Stewart Institute)
Phoenix Indian Industrial School (Peel Institute)
Fort Lewis Indian Industrial School
Fort Shaw Indian Industrial School
Perris Indian Industrial School (Sherman Institute)
Flandreau Indian Industrial School (Riggs Institute)
Pipestone Indian Industrial School
Mt. Pleasant Indian Industrial School
Wittenberg Indian Industrial School
Greenville Indian Industrial School
Morris Indian Industrial School
Chamberlain Indian Industrial School
Fort Bidwell Indian Industrial School
Rapid City Indian Industrial School
Chapter 5 - Conclusion
Bibliography
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Historical demographics, student origins, and recruitment at off-reservation Indian boarding schools, 1900

Historical demographics, student origins, and recruitment at off-reservation Indian boarding schools, 1900

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Published by joshmeisel
Beginning in 1878, the United States government funded the establishment of off-reservation industrial training schools for Native American youth. Much has been written about the histories of the schools, but information is limited about the students recruited to them. This research examines enrollment and recruitment policies established by the Bureau of Indian Affairs and people like Richard Henry Pratt, the man responsible for creating and developing the off-reservation boarding school system. The 1900 United States Census is used to create maps of student distributions, graphs, and tables detailing the student population demographics, and to compare these data to expected values based on recruitment/enrollment criteria. Although there is wide variation in student demographics among the individual schools, the results indicate that a large number of students enrolled at these schools did not meet the attendance requirements with regard to age limits, gender proportions, the degree of Indian ancestry and the tribal region from where the students came.
Beginning in 1878, the United States government funded the establishment of off-reservation industrial training schools for Native American youth. Much has been written about the histories of the schools, but information is limited about the students recruited to them. This research examines enrollment and recruitment policies established by the Bureau of Indian Affairs and people like Richard Henry Pratt, the man responsible for creating and developing the off-reservation boarding school system. The 1900 United States Census is used to create maps of student distributions, graphs, and tables detailing the student population demographics, and to compare these data to expected values based on recruitment/enrollment criteria. Although there is wide variation in student demographics among the individual schools, the results indicate that a large number of students enrolled at these schools did not meet the attendance requirements with regard to age limits, gender proportions, the degree of Indian ancestry and the tribal region from where the students came.

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Categories:Types, School Work
Published by: joshmeisel on Aug 22, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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08/30/2014

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