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The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation — Volume 03 by Hakluyt, Richard, 1552-1616

The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation — Volume 03 by Hakluyt, Richard, 1552-1616

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Principal Navigations, Voyages,
Traffiques, and Discoveries of The English Nation, v3, by Richard Hakluyt
#6 in our series by Richard Hakluyt

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**Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla Electronic Texts**
**eBooks Readable By Both Humans and By Computers, Since 1971**
*****These eBooks Were Prepared By Thousands of Volunteers!*****

Title: The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques,
and Discoveries of The English Nation, v3
North-Eastern Europe and Adjacent Countries
Part II. The Muscovy Company and the North-Eastern Passage

Author: Richard Hakluyt
Release Date: February, 2005 [EBook #7476]
[Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule]

[This file was first posted on May 8, 2003]
Edition: 10
Language: English
Character set encoding: ISO-Latin-1
*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK PRINCIPAL NAVIGATIONS, V3 ***

Produced by Karl Hagen and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team.
** Transcriber's Notes **

The printed edition from which this e-text has been produced retains the
spelling and abbreviations of Hakluyt's 16th-century original. In this
version, the spelling has been retained, but the following manuscript

abbreviations have been silently expanded:

- vowels with macrons = vowel + 'n' or 'm'
- q; = -que (in the Latin)
- y[e] = the; y[t] = that; w[t] = with

This edition contains footnotes and two types of sidenotes. Most footnotes
are added by the editor. They follow modern (19th-century) spelling
conventions. Those that don't are Hakluyt's (and are not always
systematically marked as such by the editor). The sidenotes are Hakluyt's
own. Summarizing sidenotes are labelled [Sidenote: ] and placed before the
sentence to which they apply. Sidenotes that are keyed with a symbol are
labeled [Marginal note: ] and placed at the point of the symbol, except in
poetry, where they are moved to the nearest convenient break in the text.

** End Transcriber's Notes **

THE PRINCIPAL
NAVIGATIONS, VOYAGES, TRAFFIQUES
AND
DISCOVERIES
OF

THE ENGLISH NATION.
Collected by
RICHARD HAKLUYT, PREACHER,
and Editied by
Edmund Goldsmid, F.R.H.S
VOL. III.
NORTH-EASTERN EUROPE AND ADJACENT COUNTRIES.
PART II.
THE MUSCOVY COMPANY AND THE NORTH-EASTERN PASSAGE.

Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries
IN NORTH-EASTERN EUROPE.
A briefe Treatise of the great Duke of Moscouia his genealogie, being taken
out of the Moscouites manuscript Chronicles written by a Polacke.

It hath almost euer bene the custome of nations, in searching out the
infancie and first beginnings of their estate, to ascribe the same vnto
such authors as liued among men in great honour and endued mankinde with
some one or other excellent benefite. Nowe, this inbred desire of all
nations to blaze and set foorth their owne petigree hath so much preuayled
with the greater part, that leauing the vndoubted trueth, they haue betaken
themselues vnto meere fables and fictions. Yea and the Chronicles of many
nations written in diuers and sundrie ages doe testifie the same. Euen so
the Grecians boasted that they were either Autocthones, that is

earthbredde, or els lineally descended from the Gods. And the Romans
affirme that Mars was father vnto their first founder Romulus. Right well
therefore and iudicially sayth Titus Liuius: Neither meane I to auouch
(quoth he) ne to disable or confute those thinges which before the building
and foundation of the Citie haue beene reported, being more adorned and
fraught with Poeticall fables then with incorrupt and sacred monuments of
trueth: antiquitie is it to be pardoned in this behalfe, namely in ioyning
together matters historicall and poeticall, to make the beginnings of
cities to seeme the more honourable. For sith antiquity it selfe is
accompted such a notable argument of true nobility, euen priuate men in all
ages haue contended thereabout. Wherefore citizens of Rome being desirous
to make demonstration of their Gentrie, vse to haue their auncestors armes
painted along the walles of their houses: in which regarde they were so
puffed vp, that oftentimes they would arrogantly disdaine those men, which
by their owne vertue had attained vnto honour. In like sorte Poets, when
the originall of their woorthies and braue champions was either vtterly
vnknowen or somewhat obscure, would ofte referre it vnto their Gods
themselues. So in these our dayes (to lette passe others) the Turkish
Emperour with great presumption boasteth himselfe to bee descended of the
Troian blood. Likewise the great duke of Moscouie, to make himselfe and his
predecessours seeme the more souereigne, deriueth the beginnings of his
parentage from the Romane Emperours, yea euen from Augustus Caesar. Albeit
therefore no man is so fonde as to accept of this report for trueth, yet
will wee briefly set downe what the Moscouites haue written in their
Chronicles as touching this matter.

Augustus (beleeue it who listeth) had certaine brethren or kinsfolkes which
were appoynted gouenours ouer diuers prouinces. Amongst the rest one
Prussus (of whome Prussia was named) had his place of gouernment assigned
vnto him vpon the shore of the eastern or Balthick Sea, and vpon the famous
riuer of Wixel. This mans graund children or nephewes of the fourth
generation were Rurek, Sinaus, and Truuor, who likewise inhabited in the
very same places. Whereas therefore, at the very same time the Russians or
the Moscquites without any ciuill regiment possessed large and spacious
territories towards the north, the foresayd three brethren, vpon the
perswasion of one Gostomislius the chiefe citizen of Nouogrod, in the yeare
since the worldes creation (acording to the computation of the Greekes)
6370, which was in the yeare of our Lord 572, were sent for, to beare rule.
And so ioyning their kinsman Olechus vnto them, and diuiding these huge
countreys among themselues, they laboured to reduce the barbarous and
sauage people vnto a ciuill kinde of life.

Sinaus and Truuor deceasing without issue, Rurek succeeded and left a sonne
behinde him named Igor; who not being of sufficient yeres to beare rule,
was committed vnto the protection of his kinsman Olechus. The sayde Igor
begate of Olha daughter vnto a citizen of Plesco (who, after her husbande
was slaine by his enemies, taking her iourney to Constantinople, was there
baptized by the name of Helena) a sonne called Stoslaus, who fought many
battels with the neighbour countreys. Howbeit at length Stoslaus was slayne
by his foe, who making a drinking cup of his skull, engraued therupon in
golden letters this sentence: Seeking after other mens he lost his owne. He
left behind him three sonnes, namely Teropolchus, Olega, and Vulodimir. The
which Vulodimir hauing slaine his two brethren, became sole gouernour of
Russia, or (as the Moscouites call it) Rosseia, his owne selfe. This man
beginning at length to loath and mislike the ethnik religion, and the
multitude of false gods, applyed his minde vnto the religion of Christ, and
hauing taken to wife Anna sister vnto Basilius and Constantinus Emperours
of Constantinople, was together with his whole nation, in the yeare of

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