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Ch 12 - Distributed Systems - George Colouris

Ch 12 - Distributed Systems - George Colouris

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10/22/2011

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Copyright © GeorgeCoulouris, Jean Dollimore,Tim Kindberg 2001email:
authors@cdk2.net 
This material is madeavailable for private studyand for direct use byindividual teachers.It may not be included in anyproduct or employed in anyservice without the writtenpermission of the authors.
Viewing: These slidesmust be viewed inslide show mode.
Teaching materialbased on DistributedSystems: Conceptsand Design, Edition 3,Addison-Wesley 2001.
Distributed Systems Course
Transactions and Concurrency Control
12.1Introduction12.2Transactions12.3Nested transactions12.4Locks12.5Optimistic concurrency control12.6Timestamp ordering
 
2
Introduction to transactions
The goal of transactions
 –the objects managed by a server must remain in a consistent state
when they are accessed by multiple transactions and
in the presence of server crashes
Recoverable objects
 –can be recovered after their server crashes (recovery in Chapter 13) –objects are stored in permanent storage
Failure model
 –transactions deal with crash failures of processes and omissionfailures of communication
Designed for an asynchronous system
 –It is assumed that messages may be delayed
As transactions use permanent storageThe failure model also deals with disks
 
What sort of faults can diskssuffer from?
How can we deal with omission faults in disks?
 
File writes may faila)By writing nothingb)By writing a wrong value, but checksumsare used so that reads detect bad blocksTherefore (a) and (b) are omission failuresWriting to the wrong block is an arbitrary failure
.
 
3
Operations of the
 Account 
interface
create(name)
→ 
account 
create a new account with a given name
lookUp(name)
→ 
account 
 return a reference to the account with the givenname 
branchTotal()
→ 
amount 
return the total of all the balances at the branch
Operations of the
Branch
interface
deposit(amount)
deposit amount in the account
withdraw(amount)
withdraw amount from the account
getBalance()
→ 
amount 
return the balance of the account
setBalance(amount)
set the balance of the account to amount
Figure 12.1Used as an example.
 
Each
 Account 
isrepresented by a remote object whoseinterface
 Account 
provides operations for making deposits and withdrawals and for setting and getting the balance.
 
and each
Branch
of the bank is represented by aremote object whose interface
Branch
providesoperations for creating a new account, looking oneup by name and enquiring about the total funds atthe branch. It stores a correspondence betweenaccount names and their remote object references

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