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Supermarket Price Decoder

Supermarket Price Decoder

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Published by hungry1
The supermarket price decoder table is not properly viewable with iPaper. If you want a copy, you will just have to visit another site to get it. You might want to read this first to find out why.

PATIENCE is a virtue that our society doesn't seem to have in abundance today. In this day and age there apparently isn't time for it. That must make 21st century patience an oxymoron. People feel compelled, not just to jump to conclusions, but to take huge flying leaps to them. Though the dictionary defines the words “assume” and “presume” the same way, nobody has ever been accused of being “assumptuous.”

With this in mind, consider the difference between “conclusion” and “preclusion.” The former can only be arrived at by taking into account whatever data may be available – “con” meaning “with.” On the other hand, the latter can be reached prior to obtaining any information whatsoever – “pre” meaning “before.” Therefore, merely “jumping to conclusions” would not be nearly as accurate as “hurtling to preclusions” since no data has yet been acquired with which to “conclude.”

The foregoing was all stated as a preamble to explain why the supermarket price decoder table is not available for the iPaper preview. In Scribd's faqs they state more than once that it displays monospaced fonts correctly. In this case it apparently doesn't recognize the font type because it completely fails to do the job. It reduces the characters and collapses all the spaces, making a perfectly aligned table look like a piece of useless junk.

Since most people are high on first impressions, they will undoubtedly lunge to the wrong preclusion, even though information to the contrary is being given right here. Based on the premise that “what you see is what you get” and “a picture is worth a thousand words,” they would naturally presume that it must be unusable if it looks that way in the preview. That is why it is not displayed now and will not be shown here unless Scribd actually gets around to making iPaper handle this font properly. However, at the end of the document are images taken from previews of it, both as it should be and how it appears on the two web sites where it can be downloaded correctly.

If you want a copy of the supermarket price decoder table you can still have it for free, but you will have to take the M.S.Word version before you can look at it, other than just the smaller image.. Only by seeing it as it was intended to be seen will you be able to make an accurate evaluation of whether it will do you any good or not. That defeats the whole point of having a preview, but it’s preferable to the alternative. Maybe the afore mentioned image will suffice to allow you to make a decision. You'll find the supermarket price decoder table completely intact and perfectly aligned at http://www.box.net/shared/d4jq1xzco1. You can also click on the link near the end of the article.

Even if you don't have MicroSoft Word, you can still use the Word Viewer to read any and all files formatted by it. It's also free on the MicroSoft web site at http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=95e24c87-8732-48d5-8689-ab826e7b8fdf&displaylang=en. There is a direct link to it at the bottom of the article, too.

After you see the supermarket price decoder table, it would be appreciated if you would browser back here and make a comment if you have anything constructive to say about it, positive or negative. If you have read this far, thank you and maybe the chart will be an adequate reward for your patience. For those of you who have not, you'll get another chance if you read the article. f3
The supermarket price decoder table is not properly viewable with iPaper. If you want a copy, you will just have to visit another site to get it. You might want to read this first to find out why.

PATIENCE is a virtue that our society doesn't seem to have in abundance today. In this day and age there apparently isn't time for it. That must make 21st century patience an oxymoron. People feel compelled, not just to jump to conclusions, but to take huge flying leaps to them. Though the dictionary defines the words “assume” and “presume” the same way, nobody has ever been accused of being “assumptuous.”

With this in mind, consider the difference between “conclusion” and “preclusion.” The former can only be arrived at by taking into account whatever data may be available – “con” meaning “with.” On the other hand, the latter can be reached prior to obtaining any information whatsoever – “pre” meaning “before.” Therefore, merely “jumping to conclusions” would not be nearly as accurate as “hurtling to preclusions” since no data has yet been acquired with which to “conclude.”

The foregoing was all stated as a preamble to explain why the supermarket price decoder table is not available for the iPaper preview. In Scribd's faqs they state more than once that it displays monospaced fonts correctly. In this case it apparently doesn't recognize the font type because it completely fails to do the job. It reduces the characters and collapses all the spaces, making a perfectly aligned table look like a piece of useless junk.

Since most people are high on first impressions, they will undoubtedly lunge to the wrong preclusion, even though information to the contrary is being given right here. Based on the premise that “what you see is what you get” and “a picture is worth a thousand words,” they would naturally presume that it must be unusable if it looks that way in the preview. That is why it is not displayed now and will not be shown here unless Scribd actually gets around to making iPaper handle this font properly. However, at the end of the document are images taken from previews of it, both as it should be and how it appears on the two web sites where it can be downloaded correctly.

If you want a copy of the supermarket price decoder table you can still have it for free, but you will have to take the M.S.Word version before you can look at it, other than just the smaller image.. Only by seeing it as it was intended to be seen will you be able to make an accurate evaluation of whether it will do you any good or not. That defeats the whole point of having a preview, but it’s preferable to the alternative. Maybe the afore mentioned image will suffice to allow you to make a decision. You'll find the supermarket price decoder table completely intact and perfectly aligned at http://www.box.net/shared/d4jq1xzco1. You can also click on the link near the end of the article.

Even if you don't have MicroSoft Word, you can still use the Word Viewer to read any and all files formatted by it. It's also free on the MicroSoft web site at http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=95e24c87-8732-48d5-8689-ab826e7b8fdf&displaylang=en. There is a direct link to it at the bottom of the article, too.

After you see the supermarket price decoder table, it would be appreciated if you would browser back here and make a comment if you have anything constructive to say about it, positive or negative. If you have read this far, thank you and maybe the chart will be an adequate reward for your patience. For those of you who have not, you'll get another chance if you read the article. f3

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: hungry1 on Mar 29, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial No-derivs

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12/11/2010

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FREE SUPERMARKET PRICE DECODER
by T J Roberts
f1
You've probably noticed that supermarkets have recently changed their tactics from giving you the prices of itemsto only giving you formulas that can be used to calculate those prices instead. The whole point of this is just to loosen upthe money in your wallet. People who don't really know the cost of their purchases will be less reluctant to pay higher prices for them. Nobody wants to carry a calculator around just to do price comparisons, but until now that's pretty muchwhat you had to do to find the difference.If you've ever wished for a simple decoder where you could just look up the answers to all those formulas on onepage rather than having to guess at them, then you've come to the right place. That's exactly what the supermarket pricedecoder does for you is to give you
all 
the answers on one side of a single sheet of paper. Now you can beat the storesat their own game, or at least one of their games.Believe it or not, the vast majority of people feel overwhelmed by rows and columns of numbers – sort of anumeric vertigo. So please try not to panic when you look at the table in the link below. These figures are not there as aproblem, but rather are the very answers you need to demystify the newest version of those supermarket price formulas.They are good guys working for you to simplify your shopping experience while helping you to save money in the process.So keep in mind that every number you see in the body of the table is actually the
answer 
to one of their price formulas.HOW GREEDY CAN THEY GET??Anyone can tell when a simple price increase takes place if they know what they previously paid for an item. Butthe stores and manufacturers have come up with numerous ways to sneak raises by customers without them evenknowing it! First they reduce the quantity, amount, weight or quality of a product while maintaining the size of the packageitself. The result is that you get less, use it up faster, run out sooner and have to buy it more often. It has the exact sameresult because you wind up paying more to get the same amount of product.Then they came up with the bright idea of shrinking the size of an item so the count remains the same and, of course, so does the original packaging as often as possible to further the deception. If you shake things that are loose ina container, you can actually sometimes notice an increase in the rattling sound of the contents. But there is only somuch they can remove from a package and still expect people to be willing to buy it.So now they have figured out a simpler way to hike prices without the need to modify the package printing or thecontents at all. The sneaky way they thought up to slip them past you is to confuse you by giving you
formulas
instead of the actual prices themselves. They know that math is not a strong point for most people, so they started posting price
formulas
that require calculation just to figure out what you have to pay for something. Few people can glance at a shelf price change to see that 3 for $1 has now become 5 for $2 and ever know that means a 20% cost increase. Given thetime and a calculator it can be done, of course. But no one wants to bother with that while walking down the aisle trying tohurry home after work or with your kids nagging you to spend even more than necessary.That is where the supermarket price decoder can help, because it turns those price formulas that are designed toconfuse you back into the simple dollars and cents that you already know. All you have to do is just look up the answer of virtually
any 
price for which you may need a decoder.DON’T BUY AT FAKE “SALES”You should realize that supermarkets never really played fair from the start when it comes to pricing. They wouldhave you believe that the higher white tags are the “regular” prices while the lower yellow ones are the “sales.” Whilethere is no question that they often do have many legitimate sales, most of the time it's the other way around. In other words, the lower yellow tag prices are really the “regular” ones while the higher numbers are just there to encourage youbuy it quickly while it's on “sale.”Sometimes they even go so far as to sacrifice selling much of an item for a week or two by charging “full price” just to prove to you that the lower one is a real bargain. They also need to do this occasionally to find out what the marketwill bear, or just how high they can go before you won't pay for it. Surprisingly, it appears that a lot of people don't seemto have limits; whatever is demanded is what most of them fork over, up to a point. They don't even bother to look aroundfor a better deal, which sometimes can be found on the very same shelf where they're already looking!The supermarkets latest price ploy is that they are jacking up shelf amounts across the board. Even though theystill sell the items at the same price as before the “hike spike,” they now show the old price as if it were a “sale” to trick youinto thinking it's a bigger bargain than it was before the increase. Along with that you can expect to say “good-bye” tosome of the previous lower on-sale prices and still see them continue their upward spirals.This is far from the first time they have done this, of course. However, this time you’re in for a real sticker shocksince the new raises are in the neighborhood of fifty percent overall. Naturally they claim it's not really their fault, becausethey like to blame the cost of gas for everything, as if you're not already being gouged enough for that. But at least nowyou'll know exactly what you are really paying for all the items you buy with the supermarket price decoder at hand.CHEATINGCheating is only illegal when there is a law or rule that specifically prohibits the action. A dictionary defines it as“to deceive or mislead somebody, especially for personal advantage.” It could also be defined as circumventing acceptedprocedures to reach a goal in an easier manner. However, the criterion for telling if it is immoral or improper is primarilydetermined by whether it hurts someone else when you do it.
 
Some people seem to think that if there's no law against it, that must mean all is fair and everyone for themselves.In reality, that would only be the meaning of “legality” rather than “cheating.” If it deprives someone else of anything or causes another person any kind of harm, pain, suffering or loss, even if they don't know that you are taking it from them,and it's done to gain that unfair advantage, then you are still cheating them whether it breaks a rule or not. On the other hand, if you can gain that advantage without somebody else having to lose something for it, even though it may be called“cheating” because of bypassing accepted procedures, and there is no harm coming to anybody else because of your actions, then it would actually be something positive with no negative implications.There are actually two forms of it occurring here. One could be called “legal cheating” and the other “legitimatecheating.” The first is being done by the supermarkets because they realized that, by separating people from theknowledge of the cost of items, customers would be less resistant to paying more for them. That hurts people by causingthem to spend more than they otherwise would if they were aware of the actual price. But it’s
legal 
because there is nolaw against it yet.Legitimate cheating occurs when a customer uses the supermarket price decoder to turn those confusing"
Quantity 
for 
Dollars
" price formulas back into actual dollars and cents per item to regain control of that knowledge. It’s
legitimate
because no one gets hurt by it except maybe the ill-gotten profits of the stores that are trying to cheat
you 
. For this reason the supermarket price decoder could also be called a “cheat sheet,” which merely means a convenient sourceof access to information without having to work for it each time. Perhaps it would be more accurate to call it a “don't
get 
cheated sheet” instead.THE LOGICAL ALTERNATIVEYou could always use a calculator to reach the same end, but it's bulky, inconvenient, requires batteries and youmust be careful not to accidentally press the wrong button at the wrong time. On the other hand, the supermarket pricedecoder folds up, fits in your hand or pocket, and can be set right in your basket to glance at as needed. Also, it hasguidelines to help you follow each row across and each column up and down.An added bonus is that the more you use it, the more of the answers you will come to know without having tokeep looking them up. As a result, other people will think that you're smarter than you are. In fact, if you use it enough,you
will be
smarter than you are. Then they'll be right, because you'll know exactly how much you're paying for each itemyou buy
without 
using a calculator. How many people do you know that can say that truthfully?You can keep one in your wallet or purse or pocket, or anywhere you want and take it with you wherever you gofor 
free
. Print out or copy as many as you need to do the job, and no one will ever know that you’re using a “cheat sheet”unless you choose to tell them.PRELIMINARY DETAILSUnlike their supermarket price formulas, the decoder table is designed to be easy to use. The shaded or colorednumbers are just labels. The up and down ones with the dollar signs ($) show the monetary amounts, and the labelsgoing across with the number signs (#) designate the number of items you get for that price.The other numbers in the table represent the actual cost in cents for the number of items indicated in the #column label (above or below it) and for the amount shown in the $ row label (to the left or right of it.) For instance, if youlook in the lower right quadrant of the table, and at the upper right number, you will see “55.That means the real price of “20 for $11” is 55¢ each. More detailed instructions along with several other examples are shown on the same page withthe supermarket price decoder table.Even if you're good at math you will still make mistakes sometimes, especially when you're in a hurry, beingharassed by your kids or rushed through the checkout line. That's the whole reason the supermarket price decoder wasdevised. Using it is just one more way to become a RubberBucker™ by stretching your dollars to go further. These daysyou need all the rubber you can get in those bucks, too.Anytime you send money for something with a no-risk, iron-clad guarantee, you are still risking whatever you sendthem no matter what they call it. Since the supermarket price decoder is really
FREE 
with no purchase or expenditure of any kind required, this is truly one iron-clad guarantee you absolutely
can't 
lose any money on, so why not give it a try?WHY IS THE TABLE AT ANOTHER LOCATION?You can see what the chart really looks like in Figure 1 at the top of the next page. Although Scribd.com insiststhat their site handles monospaced fonts correctly, a glance at Figure 2 below it shows that is clearly not true, because itcollapses the columns just like a proportional one. Box.net adds too much side margin and causes all the lines in thebody of it to wrap around, which also throws the display out of whack, as you can see in Figure 3. However, both of thesesites actually do download the file properly, despite their errant displays, but don't even think about printing it from them.As explained in paragraph three of this article, since so many people are intimidated by a page full of numbers, just imagine how they will probably react to a page of 
misaligned 
numbers as displayed on those sites. The purpose of the Price Decoder is to get people to use it, not discourage them from it, which is what the poor displays will do.Therefore, their first look at it needs to be at least a good view of what they will get. That makes it worth the extra click.To download your 
FREE 
Supermarket Price Decoder table, go to or click on http://www.box.net/shared/d4jq1xzco1,  or http://www.scribd.com/doc/2600407/sSPD2f7?secret_password=fk3kljt9v9yu42p3bs0. Then, when you have the time,be sure to return here to give us some feedback in the comments area on this site. Thanks for visiting.P.S.If you don't have MicroSoft Word, you can still use the Word Viewer to read any and all files formatted byit. It's also
free
on the MicroSoft web site Just click on the link below or copy and paste it into the OPEN or ADDRESSbox in the Internet browser. If you copy it, be sure to take the entire address.
 
Figure 1: This is what the chart looks like when it is properly downloaded, then printed.Figure 2: This is what Scribd.com's website display looks like, even though it downloads properly

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