Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
4Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Annual Report on Teacher Pay: N.C. teacher compensation is more than $4,000 higher than the national average

Annual Report on Teacher Pay: N.C. teacher compensation is more than $4,000 higher than the national average

Ratings: (0)|Views: 4,014 |Likes:
When adjusted for pension contributions, teacher experience, and cost of living, North Carolina’s adjusted average teacher compensation is $59,252, which is $4,086 higher than the U.S. adjusted average compensation and ranks 14th highest in the nation. In a comparison of Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) states, North Carolina’s adjusted teacher compensation is $674 higher than the SREB average adjusted compensation.

Author: Terry Stoops
When adjusted for pension contributions, teacher experience, and cost of living, North Carolina’s adjusted average teacher compensation is $59,252, which is $4,086 higher than the U.S. adjusted average compensation and ranks 14th highest in the nation. In a comparison of Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) states, North Carolina’s adjusted teacher compensation is $674 higher than the SREB average adjusted compensation.

Author: Terry Stoops

More info:

Published by: John Locke Foundation on Dec 10, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/24/2012

pdf

text

original

 
or Trut 
The John Locke Foundation
is a501(c)(3) nonprot, nonpartisan researchinstitute dedicated to improving public policy debate in North Carolina. Viewpoints expressed by authors do not necessarilyrefect those o the sta or board o the Locke Foundation.
200 W. Morgan, #200Raleigh, NC 27601
phone:
919-828-3876
ax:
919-821-5117www.johnlocke.org
e
spot
light
e
ducation researchers Jay Greene and Marcus Winters said it best:“Few clichés permeate our culture more thoroughly than that o theunderpaid schoolteacher.”
1
And nobody perpetuates that cliché betterthan the National Education Association (NEA), the nation’s largest teachersunion.In December, the NEA released its annual estimates o teacher salariesor the 2008-09 school year. Over the past decade, the education establishmenthas been using teacher salary reports rom the NEA and the American Federa-tion o Teachers (AFT) to support a campaign that portrays teachers as victimso miserly, unappreciative, and ignorant taxpayers.
2
National polls conductedover the last twenty years indicate that the campaign is working. At the starto the 1980s, polls showed that a plurality o Americans agreed that teacherpay was appropriate or the proession. In 1981, 41 percent o respondents saidthat teacher pay was “about right” and 29 percent said that it was too low. By1999, only 26 percent o respondents said that teacher pay was “about right”and 61 percent said that it was too low. Polls conducted since 2000 revealednearly identical results.
3
 Such rhetoric compelled elected ocials in a number o states to promiseteachers multi-year pay increases to reach the national or regional average. In2005, Governor Easley announced a plan that would raise teacher salaries tothe national average within our years, estimated to be $52,266 by the 2008-09school year.
4
While the teacher unions and their aliates praise these eorts,raising salaries to an arbitrary goal like a national average produces positivemedia coverage, not better teachers.
5
There is no evidence that reaching an “av-
No. 367 – February 3, 2009
 A
nnuAl
R
epoRt
 
on
t
eAcheR
p
 Ay
 N.C. teacher compensation is more than $4,000 higher than the national average
key facts:• Whn djud or pnion onribuion, hrxprin, nd o o living, Norh crolin’ djud vrg hrompnion i $59,252, whih i $4,086 highr hn h U.s. djud vr-g ompnion nd rn 14h high in h nion.• In  omprion o souhrn Rgionl eduion Bord (sReB) ,Norh crolin’ djud hr ompnion i $674 highr hn hsReB vrg djud ompnion.
more >>
 
erage” salary level will produce a signicant increase in teacher recruitment and retention or student perormance.In general, the mainstream media has been complicit in this eort by casting an uncritical eye on the NEA teachersalary studies. Taken at ace value, the NEA’s teacher salary report showed that teacher’s salaries in North Carolinawere alling behind the nation and the region. The NEA ranked North Carolina 30th in the nation in average teacherpay. They estimated that the state’s average teacher salary was $48,603, over $5,300 less than the unadjusted U.S.average, as calculated by NEA analysts.
6
The unadjusted salary gures, however, are misleading because they ignoreimportant dierences between states.
 adjuing or co o Living, Pnion conribuion, nd exprin
The NEA admits that its rankings o nominal or unadjusted salaries will not produce apples-to-apples compari-sons o teacher pay across states. The authors o the report caution,Further, any discussion o average salary gures in the absence o other data about the specicstate or district provides limited insights into the actual “value” o those salaries. For example,variations in the cost o living may go a long way toward explaining (and, in practice, oset-ting) dierences in salary levels rom one area o the country to another.
7
 Without a doubt, cost o living is one o the most important dierences between states. States such as Connecticut,New Jersey, and Caliornia have a high average salary and a high cost o living to match. The high cost o living inthese and other states will weaken the purchasing power o a teacher’s compensation. On the other hand, states likeNorth Carolina have a low cost o living, strengthening the buying power o a teacher’s compensation.In addition, the NEA teacher salary study does not take into account actors such as pension contributions andteacher experience that more accurately represent teacher compensation in North Carolina and across the country.Pension contributions add, sometimes signicantly, to the overall value o the teacher’s yearly compensation.
8
 Finally, teacher experience is a critical actor to include in any comparison o teacher salaries. Teachers are paidon a scale that increases their salary or each additional year o employment. States with a more experienced teacherworkorce will post a higher average salary, which will skew the comparison with states that have less-experiencedteachers. By adjusting or this actor, the experience or inexperience o the workorce will not distort comparisons o average teacher salaries or each state, leading to a much more accurate salary comparison at a given level o senior-ity. On average, North Carolina’s teachers are less experienced than the national average, so the NEA’s salary gurearticially defates the state’s average teacher compensation when compared to other states.
Norh crolin I abov h Nionl nd Rgionl avrg
North Carolina adjusted compensation surpasses both the average and the median compensation or the nation(see
tbl 1
, pp. 3-4). North Carolina’s adjusted teacher compensation is $59,252, which is $4,086 higher than the U.S.adjusted average compensation. North Carolina’s low cost o living and lower-than-average teacher experience raisedthe state’s ranking rom 30th on the NEA ranking to 14th in the nation when compensation was adjusted or pensioncontribution, average years o experience, and cost o living.
9
 Compared with our peers, teacher compensation in North Carolina is above average. In a ranking o SouthernRegional Education Board (SREB) states, North Carolina ranks seventh in both the initial and adjusted ranking. Thestate’s adjusted teacher compensation is $674 higher than the SREB average (see
tbl 2
, p. 5). In the Southeast, onlyGeorgia and Alabama rival North Carolina’s adjusted average teacher compensation.North Carolina’s average teacher pay has nearly doubled (up 93 percent) between 1988 and 2008 (see
figur 1
, p.5). On the other hand, state employees had pay increases totaling nearly 56 percent over the last twenty years.
10
 
 
tbl 1. adjud thr compnion b s nd D.c.
11
 
Salary adjusted or pension contribution, average years o experience, and cost o living
There are wide variations in teacher pay across North Carolina school districts. Much o these variations are likelythe result o dierences in the experience o the teacher workorce and the educational attainment o the classroomteachers. Many o North Carolina’s growing urban and suburban districts must recruit teachers with a bachelor’sdegree and little or no experience to meet their demand or teachers. As with the state’s average compensation, a lessexperienced workorce will lower the average district compensation gure.
th fuur o thr P
Despite multi-million-dollar increases in teacher pay, it has become clear that across-the-board raises unrelated toperormance serve to reward both good teachers and mediocre ones, thus doing little to help students learn.
 
2008 NEA RankJurisdiction Average Salary(NEA) PensionContribution Rates AverageYears of  ExperienceCOL Index  Adjusted Compensation2008Final  Rank 
17Georgia $53,270.00 9.28% 12.9 0.909 $72,393 15Illinois $62,787.00 9.50% 14.7 0.971 $70,238 223Kentucky $49,539.00 12.36% 13.4 0.914 $66,270 328Alabama $48,906.00 8.17% 12.8 0.917 $65,723 436Arkansas $47,472.00 14.00% 13.6 0.894 $64,907 513Delaware $55,994.00 6.10% 13.4 1.002 $64,523 616Ohio $54,925.00 13.00% 15.2 0.935 $63,683 711Michigan $57,327.00 8.10% 14.7 0.967 $63,572 89Alaska $58,916.00 21.00% 12.6 1.307 $63,125 940Texas $46,179.00 6.58% 12.6 0.909 $62,663 1010Rhode Island $58,491.00 25.03% 14.3 1.200 $62,146 1133Arizona $47,937.00 9.10% 11.9 1.066 $60,120 122New York $65,234.00 8.60% 13.2 1.305 $59,972 13
30North Carolina $48,603.00 3.05% 12.8 0.963 $59,252 14
44Missouri $44,712.00 12.00% 13.7 0.910 $58,574 151California $66,986.00 10.27% 13.5 1.365 $58,452 1622Nevada $50,067.00 10.50% 12.8 1.087 $57,983 1737New Mexico $47,341.00 10.15% 13.0 1.012 $57,800 1824Louisiana $49,284.00 15.80% 15.2 0.950 $57,633 1918Oregon $52,950.00 16.97% 14.0 1.136 $56,789 2029Colorado $48,707.00 11.15% 13.2 1.058 $56,529 2125Indiana $49,198.00 19.80% 16.4 0.929 $56,412 228Maryland $60,844.00 11.17% 13.8 1.275 $56,059 2341Oklahoma $45,702.00 7.05% 14.4 0.888 $55,792 2412Pennsylvania $56,906.00 6.46% 15.7 1.015 $55,438 25
MEDIAN $48,969.00 9.10% 14.6 1.000 $55,387
more >>

Activity (4)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
sushiwan liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->