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G.R.S. Mead's Orpheus: Chapter Six

G.R.S. Mead's Orpheus: Chapter Six

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Published by Martin Euser
Orpheus, Chapter Six , by G.R.S. Mead.
Greek theology and mythology, especially useful for better understanding Plato and later writers.

Contents: Muses, elements, Gods, powers, Bacchi, planets, spheres.

Sections on:

A key to the multiplicity of the powers
The gods and their shaktis
Table of the elements & spheres
The two creations
The trinity
The quaternary
On nature and emanation
Cyclic periods and pralaya
Orpheus, Chapter Six , by G.R.S. Mead.
Greek theology and mythology, especially useful for better understanding Plato and later writers.

Contents: Muses, elements, Gods, powers, Bacchi, planets, spheres.

Sections on:

A key to the multiplicity of the powers
The gods and their shaktis
Table of the elements & spheres
The two creations
The trinity
The quaternary
On nature and emanation
Cyclic periods and pralaya

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Published by: Martin Euser on Dec 10, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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06/20/2014

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Orpheus
by G.R.S. Mead 1896
edited by Martin Euser, 2009WebmasterGnosis research Scribd:www.scribd.com/meuser
Chapter VI
.
some cosmogonical details.
Contents:A key to the multiplicity of the powersThe gods and their shaktisTable of the elements & spheresThe two creationsThe trinityThe quaternaryOn nature and emanationCyclic periods and pralaya
VI.—Some cosmogonical details.
A key to the multiplicity of the powers.IF we imagine to ourselves the sevencolours of the spectrum, the result of thebreaking up of a ray of pure sunlight bymeans of a triangular prism; and if wefurther imagine each of these seven raysbeing split up into seven sub-divisions, resembling
 
the seven parent rays, but each rayretaining its dominant tint in all its sevensub-divisions—then we shall obtain a cluethat will aid us in grasping the intricacies of the permutations and combinations of Nature-Powers. As this is a most important subjectand as, without a thorough grasp of thetheory, the Orphic Theogony and Cosmogonywould remain an unintelligible chaos, I appenda most valuable passage from Proclus'
Comment. on the Timaeus
, Book IV; (Taylor, ii.281, 282) :" Each of the planets [? 'planetary chains']is a
whole world 
, comprehending in itself many divine genera,
invisible
to us. Of allthese, however, the visible star has the government.And in this, the fixed stars differfrom those in the planetary spheres, that theformer [the fixed stars] have one monad [thesphere of fixed stars], which is the wholenessof them; but that in each of the latter[planetary spheres] there are invisible stars['globes'], which revolve together with theirspheres; so that in each, there is both thewholeness, and a leader [the 'planetary'] whichis allotted an exempt transcendency. For theplanets being secondary to the fixed stars,require a twofold prefecture, the one moretotal, but the other more partial. But that ineach of these, there is a multitude co-ordinatewith each, you may infer from the extremes.For if the inerratic sphere [of fixed stars] hasa multitude co-ordinate with itself, and earthis the wholeness of terrestrial, in the samemanner as the inerratic sphere is of celestialanimals [the 'sacred animals'—the stars beingensouled], it is necessary that each [intermediate]wholeness, should entirely possesscertain partial animals ['globes' or 'wheels']co-ordinate with itself; through which alsothey are said to be wholenesses. The intermediatenatures, however, are concealed fromour sense [are invisible], the extremes [thespheres of fixed stars (or suns) and visibleplanets] being manifest; one of them through
 
its transcendently luminous essence, and theother through its alliance to us. If likewise,partial souls [' globes'] are disseminated aboutthem, some about the sun [the substitute of an invisible planet], and others about the moon[also a substitute], and others about each of therest [the visible planets], and prior to souls,daemons [
daimones
] give completion to theherds of which they are the leaders, it is evidentlywell said that each of the spheres is aworld; theologists also teaching us thesethings when they say that there are Gods[cosmocratores, cosmagogi] in each prior todaemons, some of which are under the governmentof others. Thus, for instance, they assertconcerning our mistress the Moon, that theGoddess Hecate is contained in her, and alsoDiana. Thus too, in speaking of the sovereignSun, and the Gods that are there, they celebrateBacchus as being there," 'The Sun's assessor, who with watchful eyesurveys 'The sacred pole.'"They likewise celebrate the Jupiter whois there, Osiris, the Pan, and others of whichthe books of theologists and theurgists arefull; from all which it is evident that eachof the planets is truly said to be the leaderof many Gods, who give completion to itspeculiar circulation."On this luminous commentary of ProclusTaylor appends an excellent note, which Ihave already twice partially referred to, butwhich I now give in full to impress the theoryupon the mind of the reader."From this extraordinary passage, we mayperceive at one view why the Sun in theOrphic hymns is called Jupiter, why Apollo iscalled Pan, and Bacchus the Sun; why theMoon seems to be the same with Rhea,Ceres, Proserpine, Juno, Venus, etc., and inshort why any one divinity is celebrated withthe names and epithets of so many of the rest.

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