Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Truxton KingA Story of Graustark by McCutcheon, George Barr, 1866-1928

Truxton KingA Story of Graustark by McCutcheon, George Barr, 1866-1928

Ratings: (0)|Views: 11|Likes:
Published by Gutenberg.org

More info:

Published by: Gutenberg.org on Mar 29, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/08/2014

pdf

text

original

TRUXTON KING
A STORYof GRAUSTARK
BY
GEORGE BARR McCUTCHEON

Author of "Graustark"
"Beverly of Graustark"
etc.

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS
BY HARRISON FISHER

NEW YORK
DODD, MEAD & COMPANY
1909

CONTENTS
CHAPTER
PAGE
I TRUXTON KING
1
II A MEETING OF THE CABINET
23
III MANY PERSONS IN REVIEW
40
IV TRUXTON TRESPASSES
59
V THE COMMITTEE OF TEN
80
VI INGOMEDE THE BEAUTIFUL
94
VII AT THE WITCH'S HUT
114
VIII LOOKING FOR AN EYE
130
IX STRANGE DISAPPEARANCES
147
X THE IRON COUNT
161
XI UNDER THE GROUND
177
XII A NEW PRISONER ARRIVES
190
XIII A DIVINITY SHAPES
205
XIV ON THE RIVER
219
XV THE GIRL IN THE RED CLOAK
231
XVI THE MERRY VAGABOND
245
TRUXTON KING
1
XVII THE THROWING OF THE BOMB
263
XVIII TRUXTON ON PARADE
278
XIX TRUXTON EXACTS A PROMISE
295
XX BY THE WATER-GATE
312
XXI THE RETURN
329
XXII THE LAST STAND
345
XXIII "YOU WILL BE MRS. KING"
357
ILLUSTRATIONS

"'Don't you know any better than
to come in here?' demanded the
Prince" (page 67)

Frontispiece

"'You are the only man to whom I
feel sure that I can reveal myself
and be quite understood'"

Facing page104
"'Bobby! Don't be foolish. How
could I be in love withhim?'"
158

"'His Majesty appears to have\u2014ahem\ue000gone
to sleep,' remarked
the Grand Duke tartly"

366
The Project Gutenberg eBook of Truxton King, by George Barr McCutcheon.
CONTENTS
2
TRUXTON KING
A STORY OF GRAUSTARK
CHAPTER I
TRUXTON KING

He was a tall, rawboned, rangy young fellow with a face so tanned by wind and sun you had the impression
that his skin would feel like leather if you could affect the impertinence to test it by the sense of touch. Not
that you would like to encourage this bit of impudence after a look into his devil-may-care eyes; but you
might easily imagine something much stronger than brown wrapping paper and not quite so passive as burnt
clay. His clothes fit him loosely and yet were graciously devoid of the bagginess which characterises the
appearance of extremely young men whose frames are not fully set and whose joints are still parading through
the last stages of college development. This fellow, you could tell by looking at him, had been out of college
from two to five years; you could also tell, beyond doubt or contradiction, that he had been in college for his
full allotted time and had not escaped the usual number of "conditions" that dismay but do not discourage the
happy-go-lucky undergraduate who makes two or three teams with comparative ease, but who has a great deal
of difficulty with physics or whatever else he actually is supposed to acquire between the close of the football
season and the opening of baseball practice.

This tall young man in the panama hat and grey flannels was Truxton King, embryo globe-trotter and searcher
after the treasures of Romance. Somewhere up near Central Park, in one of the fashionable cross streets, was
the home of his father and his father's father before him: a home which Truxton had not seen in two years or
more. It is worthy of passing notice, and that is all, that his father was a manufacturer; more than that, he was
something of a power in the financial world. His mother was not strictly a social queen in the great
metropolis, but she was what we might safely call one of the first "ladies in waiting." Which is quite good
enough for the wife of a manufacturer; especially when one records that her husband was a manufacturer of
steel. It is also a matter of no little consequence that Truxton's mother was more or less averse to the steel
business as a heritage for her son. Be it understood, here and now, that she intended Truxton for the
diplomatic service: as far removed from sordid steel as the New York post office is from the Court of St.
James.

But neither Truxton's father, who wanted him to be a manufacturing Croesus, or Truxton's mother, who
expected him to become a social Solomon, appears to have taken the young man's private inclinations into
consideration. Truxton preferred a life of adventure distinctly separated from steel and velvet; nor was he slow
to set his esteemed parents straight in this respect. He had made up his mind to travel, to see the world, to be a
part of the big round globe on which we, as ordinary individuals with no personality beyond the next block,
are content to sit and encourage the single ambition to go to Europe at least once, so that we may not be left
out of the general conversation.

Young Mr. King believed in Romance. He had believed in Santa Claus and the fairies, and he grew up with an
ever increasing bump of imagination, contiguous to which, strange to relate, there was a properly developed
bump of industry and application. Hence, it is not surprising that he was willing to go far afield in search of
the things that seemed more or less worth while to a young gentleman who had suffered the ill-fortune to be
born in the nineteenth century instead of the seventeenth. Romance and adventure, politely amorous but
vigorously attractive, came up to him from the seventeenth century, perhaps through the blood of some
swash-buckling ancestor, and he was held enthralled by the possibilities that lay hidden in some far off or

TRUXTON KING
3

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->