Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword or section
Like this
42Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Gilbert Simondon - On The Mode Of Existence

Gilbert Simondon - On The Mode Of Existence

Ratings: (0)|Views: 791 |Likes:
Published by Cengiz Erdem

More info:

Published by: Cengiz Erdem on Dec 10, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/08/2013

pdf

text

original

 
On the Mode of Existence of Technical ObjectsbyGilbert Simondon
Paris: Aubier, Editions Montaigne, 1958Translated from the French by Ninian Mellamphywith a Preface by John HartUniversity of Western OntarioJune 1980Work on this project was supported throughthe Explorations Program of The Canada Council
 
Table of Contents
Preface..................................................................................................................................................3Introduction........................................................................................................................................13Chapter I: The Genesis and Evolution of Technical Objects..............................................................19I: Abstract Technical Object and Concrete Technical Object. ..................................................19II: Conditions of Technical Evolution.......................................................................................22III: The Rhythm of Technical Progress; Continuous and Minor Improvement andDiscontinuous and Major Improvement...................................................................................33IV: Absolute Origins of a Technical Lineage............................................................................36Chapter II: The Evolution of Technical Reality: Element, Individual and Ensemble........................44I: Hypertelia and Self-Conditioning in Technical Evolution....................................................44II: Technical Invention: Form and Content in Life and in Inventive Thought..........................49III: Technical Individualization.................................................................................................53IV: Evolutive Chains and Technicity Conservation. The Law of Relaxation...........................56V: Technicality and the Evolution of Technics: Technicality as an Instrument of TechnicalEvolution...................................................................................................................................60References..........................................................................................................................................70
 
Preface
By John HartSimondon's doctoral thesis, of which the English translation of Part I is given here, has a two-foldvalue, firstly for reasons implicit in the initial recognition it received two decades ago, and secondlyfor its relevance in connection with themes which have since become more evident. Slow as it has been to obtain the recognition it deserves, the book received attention originally as an introductionto a new way of understanding technology. As a scholarly work explaining the humanity containedin the machine, there was nothing like it in the entire philosophical corpus devoted to the machine,nothing that is, which combined a philosophical treatment with the same proximity to the technicalobject. The outstanding quality of Simondon's treatment is that for all the difficulties of crossingseparated domains of meaning his writing is essentially, deep down, a work of praise. When, at thesecond mechanology conference, he commended the Coal Board of England for the restoration of a Newcomen Engine, he observed that the objective of conservatories and museums is to puttechnical objects back into working condition. "There is”, he said "something eternal in a technicalschema . . . And it is that (quality) which is always present and which can be conserved in a thing".[1] The only other writer who placed the technical object on the same high plane was JacquesLafitte whose book published in 1932 first recommended the establishment of a science of machines or mechanology.[2]If as I believe, this translation is associated with a second moment in the emergence of mechanology, it nonetheless responds still to the exigencies of the first. We may envisage a newgroup of readers, not necessarily distinct but incorporating interests which did not exist before. Thefirst group were scholars and professionals in the social sciences; for them mechanology is a muchneeded discourse on technics, which is to say, a scientific treatment having technical operations asobject. The new group would be those who, anticipated by the author, perceive the possibility of incorporating the machine into the family of things human as part of a global cultural renaissance.Between the earlier and later presentations of the technological object there is no incompatibility.As occidental technology expands throughout the world, reflection on its meaning must reachdown past contradictions into the most fundamental, most universal intentions independent of ethnic roots and national cultures. The creative flowering of some part of human expression is notnecessarily confining or restricting. But technological creativity is confining unless it is allied with-1-

Activity (42)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
e127660 liked this
serge liked this
rosiedjango liked this
Mauro Luciano liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->