Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
9Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Great Theft: Wrestling Islam from the Extremists - Khaled Abou El Fadl

The Great Theft: Wrestling Islam from the Extremists - Khaled Abou El Fadl

Ratings: (0)|Views: 766 |Likes:
Published by MuslimThunder
Link to download the book:

http://ebook30.com/theology-occultism/theology-occultism/225952/the-great-theft-wrestling-islam-from-the-extremists.html

The Great Theft: Wrestling Islam from the Extremists by Khaled Abou El Fadl

The preeminent voice for moderate Muslims, both an Islamic jurist and American lawyer, offers a passionate defense of Islam against the encroaching tide of fundamentalists corrupting the true faith.

Books on Islam have proliferated in the marketplace recently, but none have answered the desperate need for a clear articulation of moderate Islam. Khaled Abou El Fadl is uniquely qualified to write this impassioned defense against the threat of Muslim fundamentalism. Seduced by the lure of fundamentalism himself as a teenager in Egypt, he rejected that path once he began studying Islamic law.

A longtime feminist and human rights advocate, since 9-11 Abou El Fadl has become increasingly active and outspoken in support of rescuing the Islamic faith from radicals. Embraced by moderate Muslims everywhere as one of the only learned voices defending the faith, he has received death threats from extremists for that very same reason.

As quick to criticize the failure of Islamic leadership in the U.S. as abroad, Abou El Fadl remains a brave voice against the pressures and threats of Wahhabi extremism.

The Great Theft will present the beliefs and practices of moderate Muslims, and identify the points of difference and disagreement with the fundamentalist-puritan practice of Islam. This book offers a vision for Moderate Islam- past, present, and future. Abou El Fadl is dedicated to providing the tools necessary to help readers reclaim an understanding of Islam that is grounded in the tradition's history and law.

http://www.law.ucla.edu/faculty/all-faculty-profiles/professors/Pages/khaled-abou-el-fadl.aspx

Dr. Khaled Abou El Fadl is one of the world’s leading authorities on Islamic law and Islam, and a prominent scholar in the field of human rights. He is the Omar and Azmeralda Alfi Distinguished Professor in Islamic Law at the UCLA School of Law where he teaches International Human Rights, Islamic Jurisprudence, National Security Law, Law and Terrorism, Islam and Human Rights, Political Asylum and Political Crimes and Legal Systems. He also holds the Chair in Islam and Citizenship at the University of Tilburg, The Netherlands.
Link to download the book:

http://ebook30.com/theology-occultism/theology-occultism/225952/the-great-theft-wrestling-islam-from-the-extremists.html

The Great Theft: Wrestling Islam from the Extremists by Khaled Abou El Fadl

The preeminent voice for moderate Muslims, both an Islamic jurist and American lawyer, offers a passionate defense of Islam against the encroaching tide of fundamentalists corrupting the true faith.

Books on Islam have proliferated in the marketplace recently, but none have answered the desperate need for a clear articulation of moderate Islam. Khaled Abou El Fadl is uniquely qualified to write this impassioned defense against the threat of Muslim fundamentalism. Seduced by the lure of fundamentalism himself as a teenager in Egypt, he rejected that path once he began studying Islamic law.

A longtime feminist and human rights advocate, since 9-11 Abou El Fadl has become increasingly active and outspoken in support of rescuing the Islamic faith from radicals. Embraced by moderate Muslims everywhere as one of the only learned voices defending the faith, he has received death threats from extremists for that very same reason.

As quick to criticize the failure of Islamic leadership in the U.S. as abroad, Abou El Fadl remains a brave voice against the pressures and threats of Wahhabi extremism.

The Great Theft will present the beliefs and practices of moderate Muslims, and identify the points of difference and disagreement with the fundamentalist-puritan practice of Islam. This book offers a vision for Moderate Islam- past, present, and future. Abou El Fadl is dedicated to providing the tools necessary to help readers reclaim an understanding of Islam that is grounded in the tradition's history and law.

http://www.law.ucla.edu/faculty/all-faculty-profiles/professors/Pages/khaled-abou-el-fadl.aspx

Dr. Khaled Abou El Fadl is one of the world’s leading authorities on Islamic law and Islam, and a prominent scholar in the field of human rights. He is the Omar and Azmeralda Alfi Distinguished Professor in Islamic Law at the UCLA School of Law where he teaches International Human Rights, Islamic Jurisprudence, National Security Law, Law and Terrorism, Islam and Human Rights, Political Asylum and Political Crimes and Legal Systems. He also holds the Chair in Islam and Citizenship at the University of Tilburg, The Netherlands.

More info:

Published by: MuslimThunder on Dec 11, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

12/11/2012

pdf

text

original

 
 Book Reviews
The Great Theft: Wrestling Islamfrom the Extremists
Khaled Abou El Fadl New York: HarperSanFrancisco, 2005. 310 pages.
Written creeds, which always come much later than the original revelation,invariably seek to define theological “orthodoxy” over and against the per-ceived heresies of competing sects. Thus, in Islam, the
Fiqh Akbar I 
stoodagainst the Kharajites, the
Wa
si
 yat Ab
u
an
i
 fah
against the Qadarites andthe first Mu`tazilites, and the
Fiqh Akbar II 
against the later Mu`tazilites.Later on, such theological treatises as al-Ash`ari’s
 Al-Ib
a
nah
and `Abd al-Qahir al-Baghdadi’s
Kitab Usul al-Din
appeared.In
The Great Theft 
, Khaled Abou El Fadl revives this tradition by stat-ing that in the wake of numerous “acts of ugliness” committed by Muslims,the ummah has reached a grave theological crossroads. Muslims are nowdivided along a spectrum between two extremes. Fundamentally, this schismis one between “moderates” (the extreme being defined by those most will-ing to reinterpret the Islamic tradition in the light of contemporary realities)and “puritans,” who, on the basis of a selective reading of Islam’s strictestschool of law (Hanbali), claim that 90 percent of human affairs are alreadycovered by God’s law (the Shari`ah). At the heart of these diametricallyopposed worldviews, he claims, is a theological decision regarding creationand the Shari`ah’s meaning.Significantly, the book’s first part is devoted to an analysis of the pres-ent crisis. In the first chapter (“Islam Torn between Extremism andModeration”), Abou El Fadl describes the split that divides the Islamic com-munity and helpfully defines the terms
moderate
(as opposed to
modernist 
,
 progressive
, or
reformist 
) and
 puritan
(not
 fundamentalist 
,
militant 
,
extrem-ist 
,
radical
, or
 jihadist 
). From the beginning, he lays aside the commonMuslim objections in the face of suicide bombings or beheadings: “the prob-lem is with Muslims, not Islam
 per se.
” Unfortunately, he argues, all sidesclaim that they are following the precepts of Islam. What is needed is a crit-
 
ical look at doctrine – how one understands and articulates the basic tenetsof the Islamic faith in the light of present realities, whether sociopolitical orintellectual.The second chapter explores “the roots of the problem.” In the wake of western colonialism, the postcolonial period has been characterized by thecrumbling of the authority structures that held the Islamic abode together forcenturies. The jurists of the various legal schools provided the needed stabil-ity in often shifting and uncertain political times via their ability to definereligious orthodoxy, offer support to fair-minded regimes, and occasionallycall for rebellion against autocratic rulers or foreign invaders. Today, notesAbou El Fadl, the fact that engineers, doctors, and even those with little for-mal education pontificate on issues of Islamic law is but one sign of aMuslim society in complete disarray.This leads him to devote the next two chapters to a detailed examinationof Wahhabism’s historical and doctrinal backdrop in the eighteenth century,its military and political defeat, its resurrection thanks to the British in the1920s, and its gradual takeover of Salafism – this time due to rising Saudioil revenues in the 1970s. For him, it is a tragedy that an extremist theologyand legal philosophy (that normally would have been sidelined and termi-nated by the moderate majority in the nineteenth century) should bebankrolled by a state and take over the ummah to such an extent that Islam’sreputation has been seriously tarnished in the eyes of most non-Muslims.Part Two, then, represents the author’s constructive proposal: how toreclaim Islam (as it was intended to be) from the puritans. The fifth chapteris the creed: “What All Muslims Agree Upon.” After this comes the heart of his argument: “God and the Purpose of Creation” (chapter 6). For puritans,the ethical values of mercy, compassion, and justice are already contained inthe law. Only scrupulous observation of the law’s minutiae will curry thefavor of a God who will mathematically sum up the good deeds, subtract thebad ones, and give His verdict on the Day of Judgment. In contrast, moder-ates see creation as establishing a trust between God and humanity. Owingto their gift of rationality, people are empowered to be God’s viceroys onEarth and are entrusted with civilizing it according to the “Divine attributesof justice, mercy, compassion, goodness, and beauty” (p. 129).For Abou El Fadl, a classically trained religious scholar (
`
Œlim
), thisinterpretation has profound implications for how one approaches Islamiclaw (chapter 7: “The Nature of Law and Morality”). This God-given burdenplaced on humanity to establish godliness, civilize Earth, and resist corrup-tion therein implies a necessary distinction between the Shari`ah, “the Way
Book Reviews97

Activity (9)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
Uwes Fatoni liked this
Ernie Jackson liked this
Azky Anz liked this
Samir Al-Hamed liked this
Meredith Deane liked this
latemmamala liked this
Irawan Syamsudin liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->