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196306 DesertMagazine 1963 June

196306 DesertMagazine 1963 June

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JUNE,
1963
MAGAZINE
of the
SOUTHWEST
40c
SOLD CAMP ON THE MOJAVEV\ORMONISM TODAYTERS FROM A DEATH VALLEY PROSPECTOR
 
Youryear-aroundadventure center...
In,
around and all directions from Phoenix and the Valley
of
he Sun, there's
fun,
adventure and vacation variety unlimited. Canyon lakes and streams,Indian ruins, historic forts and ghost towns, the Apache Trail and SuperstitionMountain, the colorful desert. A photographer's paradise, a rockhound's delight.Golf
at
its best (34 courses). Excellent highways add
to
your enjoyment
of
this excitingly different vacationland. Plan your fun trip now.
sun-tanwarm
Phoenoc
For color literature and "Places
to
Stay," write Valleyof the Sun Visitors Bureau, Phoenix, Arizona. Dept. D-2
BINDERSFOR YOURDESERTS:
$3
eachWORTH SAVING.
81%
of
our readerssave their DESERTS for future refer-ence
and
reading pleasure.The best way
to
keepyour back issues
is in
our attractive specially-made loose-leaf
BINDERS.
Gold embossed on Spanish Grain Imi-tation Leather. Space for
12
magazineseasily inserted.
A
beautiful and prac-tical addition
to
your home
book-shelf.
Mailed postpaid from:
Binder Dept., Desert MagazinePalm Desert,
Calif.
California residents please add 4% sales tax
4 WHEEL DRIVE
SPECIAL FRONTWHEEL BEARINGWRENCH
For
Jeeps
For Scouts
A MUST FORADJUSTING FRONTWHEEL BEARINGSgc PPd (add 12c» tax in Calif.)
2
BUD PASNOW
9110 Bleroit Avenue
Los Angeles 45, Calif.
This Season
explore with thefolks who pioneeredpower boating
in
Glen Canyon. Visitupper reaches ofcanyons never beforeseen from boatsapproved by U. S.Park Service andU. S. Coast Guard.Paved road to our
leavetou^a^
CANYON TOURS INC.return to it. Write WAHWEAP LODGEfor our schedule P. 0. BOX 1356and brochure. PAGE, ARIZONA
First Concessionaires for new Glen CanyonRecreation Area, Lake Powell
LETTERS
FROM OUR READERS
Southern Utah ...
To the Editor:
It
is with great concern thatI read the words "improvement" and "devel-opment" in your April Southern Utah issue.This magnificent and unique land
of
timeand room enough must not fall victim
to
the developers' schemes.
We
Americanshave
a
moral,
if
no other, obligation to keepat least one wilderness looking as the Cre-ator left it, rather than
as
man has defiledit.
If
the primeval virginity
of
this land
is
destroyed by those soul-less individuals whowould "open
it
up for the tourist dollar,"each one
of
us has lost something pricelessand irreplaceable. We must keep SouthernUtah
as a
place where one can feel him-self alone in the universe, and sense,
in
thestillness and immensity, the overpoweringpresence
of a
Something greater than he.Let only those enter the area who appreciateit enough
to
know that
its
primitive con-ditions are
a
small price
to
pay for its in-spirational majesty!
I
hope
I
never live
to
see the day when its matchless sunsets arefouled by the artificial neon glare of motels,"kiddielands,"
or
"recreation" areas.ROBERT MICHAELClaremont,
Calif.
To the Editor:
A
few comments on yourApril
'63
article
"Of
Ruins, Rocks
and
Routes":1.
It is
illegal
to
collect rocks
or
othernatural artifactual items
on the
NavajoReservation without special permits.
2.
Poncho House was known
at
leastas early
as
1875, when
it
was visited
by
W. H. Jackson.
3.
Although the cave may well have beeninhabited
as
early as 600 A.D., the puebloruins found there
no
doubt date largelyfrom the 13th Century.
4.
As
a
whole, Poncho House stretchesalong about 400 yards
of
cliff,
though notcontinuously. There were probably about150 or 160 rooms originally, but only about80 are still identifiable.
5.
Unauthorized visitors are not allowedto enter Poncho House.
A
high fence pro-tects
it
and only the Navajo Rangers andauthorized guides have keys to the gate.STEPHEN C. JETTWindow Rock, Arizona
To the Editor:
Hurray
for
DESERT
for
giving us
a
wilderness issue that
is
slantedtoward the person who wants
to
do morethan
sit by
and contemplate
the
wond-ers
of
Southern Utah. Hurray
for the
dedicated men such
as
Ken Sleight, KentFrost, Gene Foushee, Lurt Knee and
all
the others who boat the rivers and bumpover the backtrails, guiding city-bound soulsinto
the
healing wilderness. Hurray
for
mankind who has the capacity and capabili-ties of some day—perhaps sooner than mostconservationists would allow—being able
to
go into the backcountry and not litter thelandscape and
not
scratch
his
initials
in
recks and not scare off the wildlife.G. D. LAWRELFresno,
Calif.
2
/
Desert Magazine
/
June, 1963
 
CONTENTS
Volume
26
Number
6
JUNE,
1963
This Month's Cover
Purple Hedgehog Cactus blossoms photo-graphed
by
Harry Vroman.
The
hedgehogsare
a
popular
pot
plant
by
virtue
of
theirshort, globe-shaped size
and
handsome floraldisplay.
2 Letters From Our Readers3
The
Desert
In
June5 Mine
For
Sale
By HERB MURRAY
Jr.
Senor
Bob
Vegamust dispose
of
this Baja California
tur-
quoise mine.
6
New
Ideas
for
Desert Living
By
DAN LEE.
Gadgets
for
June.
!
8 Letters From
A
Prospector
By
TOM G.
MURRAY. Shorty Harris
and Ed
Cross discover
the
famous Bullfrog bonanza,and Cross tells
his
wife
all
about
it in a
rare collection
of
letters.
12 Studying
the
Summer Desert
By
JIM
EATON. Biologists from
all
cornersof
the
nation once again will make
the
desert their summer study project.
16
A Day
With
the
Papagos
By CLOYD SORENSEN
Jr.
These southernArizona tribesmen live
in a dry, shy
world.
18 Tamarisk—A Useful Import
By EDMUND
C.
JAEGER.
The
tree fromNorth Africa
is a
boon
to the
AmericanDesert.
19
Mojave Desert Gold Camp
By LADY
RAE
EASTLAND. Where touristscan capture
the
flavor
of the old
DesertWest.
23 Mormonism Today
By THOMAS
F.
O'DEA.
The
religion trans-planted
in the
desert
by
Brigham Young
is
facing
a
"lotus-eating" crisis.
27 Cohab Canyon
By
A.
GORDON HUGHES. Once
a
haven
for
polygamists seeking
to
avoid federalmarshals.
30 Mare's Tail
By FRANK DUNN.
Dry
arrangers prize thisdesert weed.
36
New
Southwest Books
By CHARLES
E.
SHELTON. Reviews
of cur-
rent desert books.
38 Desert Detours
By OREN ARNOLD. Whimsy wisdom.
A MOJAVE DESERT SUNSET —"JEWEL
IN A
JOSHUA." PHOTO
BY MAX
MAHAN
The Desert
in
June
...
WILDFLOWER SANCTUARY.
Mention
the
California poppy
to any-
one
who
knows
the
desert,
and the
thought that immediately comes
to
mind
is the
southwestern comer
of the
Mojave Desert—the bald, roll-ing landscape west
of
Lancaster where once, before
dry
farming,
the
solid mass
of
poppies covered tens
of
thousands
of
acres
of
land.Chairman Warren Dorn
of the Los
Angeles County Board
of
Super-visors
has
proposed that
a
national wildflower sanctuary under
the
National Park Service
be
established
in the
Antelope Valley.
The
National Monument (which would
be L. A.
County's first) would cover20,000 acres
of
what
is now
privately-owned land
if
Dorn's plan
is
carried
out. The
wildflower's last desert stand
is in the
Fairmont area,south
of
Highway
138.
Acquisition cost
was
estimated
at $4
million.
HOLE-IN-THE-ROCK.
On
June
4, an
estimated
150
people will
hop
into
a
third
as
many jeeps
and
other four-wheel-drive vehicles
for the
annual retracing-in-reverse
of an
historic Southern Utah trail.
The
starting point
is
Blanding;
the
destination
is the
Colorado River oppo-site
the
Hole-in-the-Rock slot down which
the
ancestors
of
many
of
the people participating
in
this trek took covered wagons, horses
and
all worldy possessions
in 1879. The
Mormon pioneers were travelingwest
to
east (reversing,
for
once,
the
traditional east
to
west tide
on the
continent). According
to
historian David
E.
Miller,
"No
pioneer
com-
continued
on
next page
DESERT is published monthly by Desert Magazine, Inc., Palm Desert, Calif,
Second
Class Postage paid at Palm Dcser!, Calif, and atadditional mailing offices under Act of March 3, 1879, Title registered No. 358865 in
U.S. Psleni
Office, and contents copyrighted 1963by Desert Magazine, Inc. Unsolicited manuscripts and photographs cannot be relumed or acknowledged unless full return postage isenclosed. Permission to reproduce contents must be secured from the editor in writing. SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: S-1.50 per year (12 issues)in t
Ho
US
1
'
S
v
Iso
where
Milow
1
1
vc ^vt'Ct^s tor Ct^tinc]? OT ^dciress, 9 n
cl
be sure to $oi*o fiio old os '^/clL os new ^cidress.
To subscribe,
or to
give
a
DESERT gift subscription,
use
the
coupon
on
page
7.
NATIONAL ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES:Ardcn
E.
Roney
&
Associates580 South
San
Vicente
Blvd.,
Los Angeles
48,
California. Phone: 651-3930NEW YORK—
41
E.
42nd
St. YU
6-0625
SAN
FRANCISCO 3—
1355 Market
St. UN
1-7175
CHICAGO!—
35
E.
Wacker
Dr.
ST 2-8196
DETROIT
26—658 Book Bldg.
WO
1-6063
EUGENE
L.
CONROTTO,
editor
&
publisher
Address Correspondence
To:
Desert Magazine, Palm Desert,
Calif.
Phone:
FI
6-8037
Tuns.
1963 /
Desnrt Mnanzina
/ 3

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