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195811 Desert Magazine 1958 November

195811 Desert Magazine 1958 November

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WILD BUCKWHEAT
By
Ai
ICF. ZIMMERMAN
Santa Ana, California1 cannot sleep
for
listening
to
the rain.Like slippered footsteps
of a
friend longgoneNow back again.And thinking
of
wild buckwheat
on the
hill.Now
it
will drink
its
fill.For long hot months the savage, searing sunBesieged
the
thirsty hill with blistering heat.Till life
in all
the tender plants was done.Only
the
buckwheat would
not
grant defeat.Passive
it
gathered
in
the golden raysThat made
it
brown and beautiful, untilIt grew
so
dry,
I
almost feared
to
touchThe sunburned blossoms that
I
loved
so
much.Oh, blessed long-awaited rain.Now the bright brittle tops will disappear;
The
seeds will scatter;And the stiff stems grow green againUnder the soft persuasion
of
the rain.
MAGIC DESERT DAYS
By GEORGIA JORIMN
San Diego, CaliforniaThe
Sun and
Desert
Air
spin magic withtheir hands,A veil
of
amethyst
as
thin
as
fairies chose.It tints
the
crystal
on the hot,
reflectingsandsTo jewel tones
of
purple, lavender and rose.1 too absorb this airy film
of
violet rays,Receiving Nature's gift
of
health fromDesert Days.
By TANYA SOUTH
Nothing
is
buried. What you arcReflects
in
everything you do.By changing pace and tone and hue.You
of
yourself can make
or
marWhatever type
of
life you fill,By what you are,
and
what
you
will.
By
INEZ
H.
Goss
Prescott, ArizonaMy baby girl, my dark-eyed one,We are
so
rich—we have the sun;We have the snow and summer rains,We have the mountains and the plains.Our hogan small and snug and warm;Your cradleboard keeps you from harm,Protected
by its
polished bows,Cushioned by bark
of
sweet cliff-rose.My prayer
is
not
for
greater wealth.But only "May you walk
in
health;May hunger always pass you
by;
May beauty by your pathway lie."
THE HARPS
By IRENE-
E,
PAYNE
Las Vegas, NevadaSometimes
at
dawn
I
hear Aolian harps,A faint sweet music with
a
haunting strainSo
far
away the muted sad refrainEscapes my ear.It
is
full strange that hereAmid the barren and the blasted peaks,The desert reaches that no verdure seeks,
The
pipes
of
Pan should tinkle still.Perhaps
it is
the little winds that runAlong the pass
to
herald waking sun.Perhaps
it is
the wings
of
birdsI strain
to
hear.Or yet the half heard music might ariseFrom
sun
rays stretching
in the
quiet skys.1 know not how the singing starts,But
in
the quiet dawnI hear the minstrel harps.
THE DESERT
By ENOLA CKAMBERLIN
Los Alamitos, CaliforniaGrandfather walked the desert,
Pricked
oxen with
a
goad;Fought sand and heat and darkness.And often made
his
road.Father pushed his horsesFrom dawn
to
dark
to try
To make
it to a
waterholeBefore his barrels went dry.Grandfather knew the desert.Its moods,
its
quiet stars;And Father took the time
to
drinkAt sunset's crimson bars.While
I
who cross the desertWith hurry
as
my need.Relinquish
all its
gloriesTo the subtle robber speed.
DESERT DAWN
By MIRIAM
R.
ANDERSON
San Bernardino, CaliforniaExpectancy pervades the quickened
air,
Bird orchestras tune softly, then
are
stilled;And silence marks the moment,
for
the clearPure essence
of
the day
to be
fulfilled.Immensity bestrides the mountain peaks,The desert sands,
the
sky—the first warmrayOf
sun
jewels glance
to
touch
the
edge
of
space—And dawn, gold-handed, sweeps
the
nightaway.
DESERT MAGAZINE
Prayer of aNavajo Mother
 
Publisher's Notes
This month's cover photograph,depicting
a
happy family
of
desertvacationers
at
White Sands NationalMonument,
New
Mexico, heralds
the
return
of the
"visiting season"
to the
Desert Southwest. This
is the
monthwhen increasing numbers
of
week-ending rockhounds make their avoca-tional jaunts
in
search
of
agate,treasured turquoise, banded jasper,Apache tears,
and
hundreds
of
otherdesert gems. This
is the
month whenthousands
of
Easterners, feeling
the
frosty approach
of
winter, dream
of
Southwestern warming ovens
— Tuc-
son, Palm Springs, Scottsdale
and a
hundred other chosen
sun
spots.And this
is the
month when
the
desertland itself
is
making
its
change-over from
the
sear-of-summer
to the
winter-welcome phase
of its
manymoods.And while
the
seasonal changes
of
our desert country
go
along theirway,
the
editorial staff
of
DesertMagazine
goes along
its way,
think-ing three months ahead
of
today.(Conversely,
it was
three months
ago
in
the 112
degree heat
of
lateAugust—that
we
were planning thisNovember issue
of
Desert.)
*
* *
Some
of our
plans ahead includethe addition
of
full-color
art on the
back cover, some color
ink on the
inside pages,
and
gradual changes
in
the format
and
design
of our
manyfeature departments.To develop
a
better
and
bigger
Desert Magazine
editorially, there
is
need
for a
corresponding growth
in
Desert's
circulation
and
advertisingsides.
Any
increment
in
circulationand advertising will
be
utilized
to
expand
the
magazine's value
as a
readable, enjoyable journal
for you.
*
* a
A survey questionnaire
was
mailedout last month
to one out of
each
10
of
Desert Magazine's
subscribers(they were picked
at
random fromour circulation files). Results
of
thisreader sampler
are
already beginningto return
to
editor Randall Hender-son's desk. Compilation
of the
ques-tionnaire will
be
reported
to you
either
in
January
or
February,
de-
pending
on how
promptly
the
repliesare mailed.
*
s
#
We hope
an
ever-increasing
num-
ber
of you
will feel,
as we
here
at
the
Desert Magazine
pueblo feel, that
Desert
is the
ideal inexpensive Christ-mas gift. Your publisher promisesthat those
who
receive
Desert Maga-zine
as a
gift this coming year will12 times bless
the
giver,
for
Desert
will continue
to
bring into focus
the
beauty
and the
wonder
and the his-
toric past
of our
Southwest—in morethan
400
pages
of
enjoyable, authenticand wholesome reading between
now
and
a
year hence.CHARLES
E.
SHELTONPublisherABOUT
THE
COVER
. . .
White
S;inds
National Monument
a
140,000-acre playground
of
gleaming whitesand located
15
miles southwest
of
Alamo-gordo
in
south-cent rat
New
Mexico.
The
Monument's slowly shifting dunes representthe largest deposit
of
surface gypsum
in the
world. Chuck Abbott
of
Tucson
is the
cover photographer.
Volume 21NOVEMBER, 1958Number 11COVERPOETRYGHOST TOWNCALENDARART OF LIVINGTRAVELFICTIONINDIANSINDIANSFIELD TRIPLETTERSCLOSE-UPSHISTORYNATUREEXPERIENCEASTRONOMYDESERT QUIZNEWSMININGHOBBYLAPIDARYCOMMENTBOOKSPHOTOGRAPHY
White Sands National MonumentBy CHUCK ABBOTTPrayer of a Navajo Mother and other poems . 2Chinese Ghost Town in the Humboldt RangeBy NELL MURBARGER 4November events on the desert 6Silence—the Desert's Most Precious GiftBy ELEANOR N. FOWLER 8Trail to the Canyon of Turquoise WaterBy RANDALL HENDERSON 9Hard Rock Shorty of Death Valley 12From Pueblo to Classroom, by LaVON TEETER 14Pueblo Portraits, by JOHN L. BLACKFORD . . 17Mojave Desert Opal DiggingsBy HAROLD O. WEIGHT 18Comment from Desert's readers 22About those who write for Desert 22Jerome, by JOSEF and JOYCE MUENCH . . 23In the Land of SagebrushBy EDMUND C. JAEGER 24Emily of the Desert TrailsBy DOROTHY ROBERTSON 27Hobbyists Who Scan the Desert Night SkyBy GASTON BURRIDGE 29A test of your desert knowledge 30From here and there on the desert 32Current news of desert mines 36Gems and Minerals 38Amateur Gem Cutter, by DR. H. C. DAKE ... 41Just Between You and Me, by the Editor ... 42Reviews of Southwestern literature 43Pictures of the Month back cover
The Desert Magazine
la
published monthly
by
Desert Magazine,
Inc.,
Taliri Desert,California. Re-entered
as
second class matter July
17, 1948, at the
Postofftce
at
Palm Desert,California, under
the Act of
March
3, 1879.
Title registered
No.
353865
In U. S.
Patent Office,and contents copyrighted
1958 by
Desert Magazine,
Inc.
Permission
to
reproduce contentsmust
be
secured from
the
editor
in
writing,CHARLES
E.
SHELTON, PublisherRANDALL HENDERSON, Editor EUGENE
L.
CONHOTTO, Associate EditorBESS STACY, Business Manager EVONNE HIDDELL, Circulation ManagerUnsolicited manuscripts
and
photographs submitted cannot
be
returned
or
acknowledgedunless full return postage
is
enclosed. Desert Magazine assumes
no
responsibility
for
damage
or
loss
of
manuscripts
or
photographs although
due
care will
be
exercised.
Sub-
scribers should send notice
of
change
of
address
by the
first
of the
month preceding issue.SUBSCRIPTION RATESOne Year SI.00
Two
Years »7.00Canadian Subscriptions
B5c
Extra. Foreign
50c
ExtraSubscriptions
to
Army Personnel Outside
U. S. A.
Must
Be
Mailed
in
Conformity With
P.
O. D.
Order
No.
19687Address Correspondence
to
Desert Magazine, Palm Desert, California
NOVEMBER, 1958

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