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195606 Desert Magazine 1956 June

195606 Desert Magazine 1956 June

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DESERT NIGHT
By
ELIZABETH
LEE
SARGENT
Ontario, CaliforniaFar removed from throbbing highways.From
the
mad roar
of
rushing cars.The desert offers solitude,And quiet peace beneath
the
stars.No man-made traps
for
weary feel,Nor lurid scenes
for
tired eyes,Only
the
silent solitude,And peace beneath
the
tranquil sides.
TRYST
By IDA F.
COMBESI
Denver, ColoradoI know cool nights
on
desert landWith emerald stars
and
rising moon;A bro.id expanse
of
sun-bleached sandWhere flowers pale
in
early June.The burnish lustred sand
I saw
And Joshua trees now bent with
age:
I drank
the
brimming cup
of
aweAnd caught
the
myrrh-sweet breath
of
sage.A silent land
on any
night.Wearing
a
robe
of
soft blue mistWith gleaming stars like candle light;Within
my
heart
I
hold
a
tryst.
DESERT
FUN
By
MARIE NYEHOLT
Pico, CaliforniaIt's
fun to
explore
in the
desert;To prowl through
the
soft golden sand.It's
fun to
examine
the
flowersThat rear their bright heads from
the
landIt's exciting
to
hunt
for the
driftwoodAnd minerals
and
gemstones that hideIn
the
cascading shade
of the
canyons.Or that lurk
in the
shifting sand tide.It's
a
glory
to
drink
at the
chaliceOf
the
life giving amber gold
sun.
And
to
feel
the
swift wingOf
the air as it
singsIt's
a
wonderful place
to
have
fun!
SONG
OF THE
SPURS
By
NINA
O.
LANSING
St. David, ArizonaA ranch woman knowsThe song
of the
spursBuckled
to
booted feet;The jingly, jangly, breadwinning spursWith music
in
their beat.She hears them whenThey accompanyA bawling calf
at
hand,Bewailing
the
searing branding ironBurning
the
owner's hrand.She hears them,
too.
They sing, they
say
As horse
and
rider take
off,
"Pound
the
leather
and
uncoil
the
twine,Pile
on the
loop—and
he's
caught!"But
the
brashest tuneIs
the
tune they playWith raking rowels that ring,"Ride that bronc
if
you're able,High—wide
an'
han'some—Zing, Zing!"Oh jingly, janglyRollickin' spurs,Ranch woman would have
you
retreat;The
day is so
long when you're bucked
too
longTo
her
cow-man's booted feet.
By
TANYA SOUTH
Unstable
is our
lot—unsure.From day
to day
some new allureHaunts us.
And our
endeavors fritter.Change brings
so
many things
to
litterThe Pathway
to the
free
and
wide.We lack
a
concentrated stride.We lack
a
fullness
in our
soul.All dedicated
to
some goal—Some purpose,
to
unswerving press.Therein lies Greatness—and Success.
By
HELEN
K.
BURBANK
San Bernardino, CaliforniaYour home
is
just
a
desert shackFar beyond
the
dripping
fog
But your friends
all
think
you
envyThem their villas
in the
smog.They shake their heads
in
wonderAnd they cannot understandWhat
it is
that keeps
you
happyIn
the
land
of
endless sand.So just
ask
them
for a
visitGet them
up at
break
of
dayAnd then wait
for
their reactionsTo
the
desert's reveille.Will their criticisms vanish?Well,
at
least they'll
be
less vocalAnd perhaps some
day
they will admilYou're
not
just
a
stupid yokel.They've been touched
by
desert magicAnd some
day
they'll understandThat
the
desert
has a
meaningFar beyond
the
shifting sand.
THE WHIRLWIND
By
MERLE
A.
BROWN
Piedmont, CaliforniaSuch
a
lonesome little whirlwindOn
the
desert's vast expanse.Pirouetting prettilyIn
her
lovely lissome dance.
DESERT LOVE
By
EVA
L.
BROWNE
Las Vegas, NevadaI found
my
ove
in a
lovely placeA meadow
the
flowers
had
left;The trees
and
rivers
had
passed
it by.
Deserted—forlorn—bereft.There
the
wind came down from
the
Walapi,A sword
in
each hand
he
came,But
he
glanced away from love's glowingcheek,And melted
his icy
flame.The dagger plant tipped
his
weapons withlight,The cactus
his
barb
had
forsworn,Mesquite
and
Joshua, spine bedightFor love, they
had
hidden their thorn.Men called
it a
desert whose charms werefew,Desolate, barren
of
grace;Men called
it a
desert,
but
oh.
I
knewLove dwelt
in a
lovely place!
SILENT GUARDS
By
FERN GREENWALD DAVIS
Long Beach, CaliforniaAs shades
of
blue
and
purpleBathe distant rugged peaks.Twilight falls
in
silence—Only nature speaks.As sleep
on
wings
of
blacknessSmothers
the
sunset's glow,Those hills—like knights
in
armor—Stand guarding
the
desert below.
BRIGHT SENTINEL
By
NELL GRIFFITH WILSON
Kenwood, CaliforniaSo rich
its
flame against
the
desert sky,So clothed
in
glory like
a
throne
on
high.It
is as if
A thousand sunsetsForever stamped their beautyOn
the
cliff.
DESERT MAGAZINE
 
DESERT CRLEIlDflR
May 30-June 17—Southwest Archi-tecture Exhibition, Museum
of
Northern Arizona,
Flagstaff.
June
1—Lowell
Observatory,
Flagstaff,
Arizona, opens evening sessions
for
public
on
alternate Fridays.
Ad-
mission
by
tickets obtainable freeof charge
at
Chamber
of
Commerceor
at
Observatory Library.June
1-3—Kids'
Rodeo, Otero CountyFairgrounds, Alamogordo,
N. M.
June
1-15—Second
Annual
Art
Show,sponsored
by
Rodeo
de
Santa
Fe,
Museum
of New
Mexico
Art Gal-
lery, Santa
Fe.
June 2—Park Lake
Day and
FishingDerby, Santa Rosa,
New
Mexico.June 2-3—Morongo Valley, Califor-nia, Annual Spanish Fiesta
at the
Morongo Lodge.June 3—Corpus Christi Sunday,
Out-
door Religious Processions fromSt. Francis Cathedral
and
CristoRey Church, Santa
Fe, New Mex-
ico;
and
Ouadalupe Church
and
Old Mission, Taos
and
Ranchos
de
Taos.June 7-9—Murray, Utah, Rodeo.June 9-10—Carson Valley Days,
Min-
den, Nevada.June 10—Tour
to
Grave
of
EugeneManlove Rhodes, Alamogordo,
New
Mexico.June 10—Procession
of La
Conquis-tadora from
St.
Francis Cathedralto Rosario Chapel, Santa
Fe, New
Mexico.June 10-17—New Mexico Girls' State,Albuquerque.June
11-16 —
Nevada Boys' State,Reno.June 12—St. Anthony's Processionafter Vespers,
La
Loma, Taos,
New
Mexico.June 13—San Antonio Corn Dance,Taos Pueblo,
New
Mexico.
Cor-
doba
and
various other northernNew Mexico rural communitieswill celebrate Feast
of San
Antoniode Padua. Fiesta
at
Sandia; Danceat
San
lldefonso.June 15—Junior Rodeo, Globe, Ariz.June 15-17—9th Annual
New
MexicoState Championship High SchoolRodeo, Santa Rosa,
New
Mexico.June 16—Desert Catalpa Club
Hos-
pitality
Day,
Lenwood, Barstow,California.June 16-17—Navajo Roundup,
Win-
dow Rock, Arizona.June 16-17—Kearny Entrada, Raton,New Mexico.June
18-22 —
Nevada Girls' State,Reno.June 20-23—Annual Strawberry Days,Pleasant Grove, Utah.June 23-24—Lions Club
All
IndianRodeo, Gallup,
New
Mexico.June 24—Annual Fiesta
and
Cere-monial Dances,
San
Juan Pueblo,New Mexico. Corn Dances
at
Taosand Acoma Pueblos.June 25-July
6 —
Southwest Writers'Workshop, Arizona State College,
Flagstaff.
Phyllis
and
WeldonHeald, directors.June 27-30—Rodeo, Miniature
Par-
ade
and
Stock Parade, Lehi, Utah.June 29-30—Vernal, Utah, AmateurRodeo.June 29-July
1—Rodeo,
Elko,
Nev.
Volume
19
JUNE, 1956
Number
6
COVERPOETRYCALENDARHISTORYDESERT QUIZCONTROVERSYWATERFIELD TRIPEXPERIENCEFORECASTNATURECLOSE-UPSGARDENINGPRE-HISTORYDESERT LIVINGLETTERSCONTESTFICTIONNEWSMININGURANIUMHOBBYLAPIDARYCOMMENTBOOKSPHOTOGRAPHY
Lurt Knee, Guide and Uranium Prospector. (Seestory page 15.) By JOSEF MUENCHPrescription and other poems 2June events on the desert 3Charcoal—The West's Forgotten IndustryBy NELL MURBARGER 4A test of your desert knowledge 8Long-Eared Problem Child of the DesertBy RUSS LEADABRAND 10Seventeen Palms, by WALTER FORD .... 13Petrified Forests in Utah's Circle CliffsBy RANDALL HENDERSON 15One-Eyed Snake of BetatakinBy LOLITA ALICE OLAINE 19Southwest river runoff predictions 20Poisonous Desert PlantsBy EDMUND C. JAEGER 21About those who write for Desert 22Summer Garden Zinnias, MarigoldsBy RUTH REYNOLDS 23Inscription House, by JOHN L. BLACKFORD . . 25We Use the Sun to Heat Our WaterBy JENNELLA ROBERTSON 26Comment from Desert's readers 28Picture-of-the-Month Contest announcement . . 28Hard Rock Shorty of Death Valley 29From here and there on the desert 30Current news of desert mines 35Progress of the mining boom 36Gems and Minerals 39Amateur Gem Cutter, by DR. H. C. DAKE . . 45Just Between You and Me, by the Editor ... 46Reviews of Southwestern Literature .... 47Pictures of the Month Back cover
The Desert Magazine
is
published monthly
by the
Desert Press,
Inc.,
Palm Desert,California. Re-entered
as
second class matter July
17, 1948, at the
postoffice
at
Palm Desert,California, under
the Act of
March
3, 1879.
Title registered
No.
358865
in U. S.
Patent Office,and contents copyrighted
1956 by the
Desert Press,
Inc.
Permission
to
reproduce contentsmust
be
secured from
the
editor
in
writing.RANDALL HENDERSON, EditorBESS STACY, Business ManagerEUGENE
L.
CONROTTO, Associate EditorEVONNE RIDDELL, Circulation ManagerUnsolicited manuscripts
and
photographs submitted cannot
be
returned
or
acknowledgedunless full return postage
is
enclosed. Desert Magazine assumes
no
responsibility
for
damage
or
loss
of
manuscripts
or
photographs although
due
care will
be
exercised.
Sub-
scribers should send notice
of
change
of
address
by the
first
of the
month preceding issue.SUBSCRIPTION RAXESOne Year $4.00
Two
Years $7.00Canadian Subscriptions
25c
Extra, Foreign
50c
ExtraSubscriptions
to
Army Personnel Outside
U. S. A.
Must
Be
Mailed
in
Conformity With
P.
0. D.
Order
No.
19687Address Correspondence
to
Desert Magazine, Palm Desert, California
JUNE, 1956

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