Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword or section
Like this
12Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
195603 Desert Magazine 1956 March

195603 Desert Magazine 1956 March

Ratings: (0)|Views: 457 |Likes:
Published by dm1937

More info:

Published by: dm1937 on Mar 30, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

04/13/2013

pdf

text

original

 
Limns
Nell Murbarger Honors
. . .
Whittier, CaliforniaDesert:I
was
very pleased
to see
that West-ern author Nell Murbarger
has
beenhonored
by The
American Associationfor State
and
Local History
(Desert,
Jan.,
'56,
page
28) for her
distin-guished service
in the
cause
of
makingAmericans better aware
of
their localhistory.She
is the
Southwest's
top
travelwriter
and
that
her
tireless enthusiasmand brilliant abilities
are
being recog-nized
is
gratifying.PAUL LINSLEYProspector
Is a
Dude
. . .
Palisade, NevadaDesert:Your magazine
has no
place
for
anything
as
contrived
and
artificial
as
the January cover picture
of the
pros-pector leading
his
burro.In
the
future, please make
the sub-
jects real.
The
title
of the
Januarycover should
be
"Dude" instead
of
"Prospector."JOE RAND
Loves
a
Little Town
. . .
Opal, WyomingDesert:"1 like
to
live
in a
little town wherethe trees meet across
the
street, whereyou wave your hand
and say
"hello"to everyone
you
meet."I like
to
stand
for a
moment
out-
side
the
grocery store,
and
listen
to the
friendly gossip
of the
folks that livenext door."For life
is
interwoven with
the
friends
we
learn
to
know,
and we
heartheir joys
and
sorrows
as we
daily comeand
go.
"So,
I
like
to
live
in a
little town,
1
care
no
more
to
roam,
for
every housein
a
little town
is
more than
a
house,it's home."I found this poem
at the Mt.
Whit-ney Cafe
in
Lone Pine, California,
and
thought
it
worth passing
on to
yourreaders.H.
H.
DeMILNER
r «iaa«
H
AGE-OLD
CJBM<»Y
INDIAN RITUALS
5.8
,»«•
U
|
10,000
Indians,
All
Tribes'|
AUGUST
9-12
,
iv
,
iv Q
. i
Write
for
information
imnSHimcA
Ceremonial Association
i
mim^tmm
\
Box 1029, Gallup, New Mexico
The white streak running
up the
middle
of
this photograph
was in-
visible
to the
naked
eye
when HenryMiller took this picture.
Can an
ordinary
box
camera assist
the
pros-pector
to
find radio-active veins?
Prospecting
by
Camera
. . .
Milwaukee, WisconsinDesert:I
am
sending
you a
photograph
of
what appears
to be a
radio-active
ore
vein
1
discovered accidentally
in cen-
tral Wisconsin last summer.
The
whitestreak running
up the
middle
of the
photograph
was not
visible
to the
nakedeye
but was
recorded
by the
camera.HENRY
F.
MILLER
Editor's Note: Interested
in the
possibilities
of
prospecting
for
radio-active ores with
a box
camera,Desert sought expert advice
on
thisproblem from Robert.
A.
Satten,
as-
sistant professor
of
physics
of the
University
of
California
at Los An-
geles.
Prof.
Satten's reply follows:"Radiation from nuclear disinte-gration does affect photo film
in the
daytime
or in the
dark
as
long
as
these rays
can
strike
the
film
in
sufficient amount
or
intensity.
How-
ever, even
if the
white vein
in the
photograph were radioactive,
its nu-
clear radiation
would,
not
affect
the
photograph
at all, for the
followingreasjns:"The film
is too far
away."Even
if
such radiation couldpenetrate such large distances
(and
it cannot)
in
sufficient intensity,
it
would
not be
focused
by a
lens
in
the
way
that visible light
is,
and
so
would
not
give
an
image,
but
wouldfog
the
entire film."It
is not
possible
to
prospect
for
uranium with
an
ordinary camera.Ordinary wrapped film might
be
used
if
held
for a
very long timeright
up
against
a
very radioactiveore. This
is the way
radio-activitywas first discovered.
But
this meth-od
is
obviously
not
sensitive enoughand that
is why we
have geigercounters,
etc.
"Daylight film does
not
have
the
same sensitivity
to the
various colorsthat
the eye
does,
so it is
conceivablethat there might
be
differences
in the
appearance
of a
landscape
by eye
and
by
camera."
Mansions
of
Mysteries
. . .
Glendale, CaliforniaDesert:Those
who
know
the
desert under-stand much about creation.They alone have seen that
the
tomb-like silence
of the
surrounding dunes,where weird cacti stand sentinel,
are a
place
of
life. They have found that
the
dead-looking, soundless spaces stockedby shrub
and
sage, shelter
the
lizardand snake. They know that
the
birdegg
and the
mouse
are
there, blendedinto
the
delicate grays, greens, browns,yellows
and
pinks characteristic
of
thisland
of
color.Those
who
dwell
in
this realm knowthere
is no
place
on
earth where
you
come closer
to
grasping
a
star
in
yourown hand than
out on
those vast sandson
any
given night.The people
who
know
the
deserthave unlocked
the
doors
to
mansionsof many mysteries
and
found there
a
large portion
of
happiness: release
and
freedom rare
to
experience.J.
H.
ERHARDTHalf-breed Wildcats
. . .
Twin Falls, IdahoDesert:I
was
very much interested
in Ed-
mund Jaeger's wildcat story
in the No-
vember,
1955,
Desert.
He
points
out
that wildcats will kill domestic cats,but
he
failed
to
mention that some-times male wildcats mate with femalehouse cats.We know
of two
offspring from sucha union. These kittens
are
tame enoughto
lay
around
on the
porch
in the sun,
but when
a
human appears they
run
for cover.They
are
larger than domestic kittensand have
an
interesting appearance.
MRS.
C. H.
MITCHELL
DESERT MAGAZINE
 
DESERT CflLEIlDflR
Feb.
15-March 5—John Hilton
Art
Exhibition
in the
Desert MagazinePueblo, Palm Desert, California.March
1—Museum
of
Northern
Ari-
zona opens
for
season,
Flagstaff,
Arizona.March
1-18 —
Southern CaliforniaArtists Exhibition
in new
Twenty-nine Palms, California, Artists GuildGallery.March
3-4 —
World's ChampionshipTennis Matches, Palm Springs, Cali-fornia.March 3-4—Sierra Club Hike
to Cot-
tonwood Mountains from Cotton-wood Springs
in
Joshua Tree
Na-
tional Monument, California.March
4
Dons
Club trek
to
Super-stition Mountain, from Phoenix,Arizona.March 4—
Out
Wickenburg
Way
StyleShow, Wickenburg, Arizona.March 6—Dog Show, Phoenix AreaSpecialty Show, State Fairgrounds,Phoenix, Arizona.March
7-8 — Dog
Show,
All
BreedShow, State Fairgrounds, Phoenix,Arizona.March 10—Palm Springs, California,Desert Museum field trip
to Mag-
nesia Canyon near Rancho Mirage.March
10 All
State High SchoolBand, Orchestra
and
Chorus
Fes-
tival, Tempe, Arizona.March 10-11—Junior
Ski
Races,
Ari-
zona Snow Bowl,
Flagstaff,
Ariz.March 11—Maricopa County Sheriff'sPosse Rodeo, Phoenix, Arizona.March 14-28—Agnes Pelton
Art Ex-
hibition
in the
Desert MagazinePueblo, Palm Desert, California.March
15-18 —
Phoenix World'sChampionship Rodeo, State Fair-grounds, Phoenix, Arizona.March 16-18—Dons Club travelcadeto Hopi Villages, from Phoenix,Arizona.March 17—Palm Springs, California,Desert Museum field trip
to Fan
Hill Canyon
in the
Little
San Ber-
nardinos.March 17-18—Desert Arabian HorseShow, Polo Grounds, Palm Springs,California.March 17-18—Sierra Club Hike
to
Split Mountain
and
Fish CreekWash from Ocotillo Wells,
Calif.
March
17-18 —
Jeep Cavalcade,Hemet, California.March
19
Ceremonial Dance,
La-
guna Pueblo,
New
Mexico.March 21-25—Maricopa County Fair,Mesa, Arizona. Miniature Paradeon
21st;
Rawhide Parade
on
22nd.March 23-25
Eagle Convention,Yuma, Arizona.March 24—Palm Springs, California,Desert Museum field trip
to
FallsCreek Canyon.March 24-25
Dons Club trek
to
Grand Canyon, from Phoenix, Ariz.March 24-30—Sierra Club Easter
Va-
cation Trip
to
Organ Pipe CactusNational Monument, Arizona
and
Cholly
Bay,
Punta Penasco, Mexico.First camp
at
Salton
Sea
State Parkon March
24.
March 27-30—Palm Springs, Califor-nia, Pageant.March 30—Passion Play
in the
Peni-tente Chapel, Taos,
New
Mexico.
L
Volume
19
COVERLETTERSCALENDARLOST MINEWILDFLOWERSEXPERIENCENATUREINDIANSTRUE
OR
FALSEPERSONALITYPERSONALITYFORECASTCLOSE-UPSGARDENINGCONTESTPHOTOGRAPHYINDIAN POLICYINDIAN POLICYAPPARELNEWSFICTIONMININGURANIUMHOBBYLAPIDARYCOMMENTBOOKSPOETRYMARCH,
1966
Number
3
Puma—Western Ways Photo by TOMMY LARKComment from Desert's readers 2March events on the desert 3The Ledge of Gold John Nummel LostBy HAROLD O. WEIGHT 4Flowering predictions for March 9Bill Williams on the RampageBy REV. NORMAN M. SORENSEN .... 10Rogue of the Rim CountryBy GASTON BURRIDGE 11Land of the GoshutesBy NELL MURBARGER 13A test of your desert knowledge . . . . . . 18Saga of Frying Pan EbbensBy EDMUND C. JAEGER 19Says Harry Oliver 21Southwest river runoff predictions 22About those who write for Desert 22Olive Trees for Shade and BeautyBy RUTH REYNOLDS 23Picture-of-the-month Contest announcement . . 24Pictures of the Month 25The Indian Bureau Is WrongBy HENRY F. DOBYNS 26The Indian Bureau Is RightBy RANDALL HENDERSON 28Desert Original: The Squaw DressBy PHYLLIS W. HEALD . . 29From here and there on the Desert 30Hard Rock Shorty of Death Valley 30Current news of desert mines 36Progress of the mining boom 37Gems and Minerals 40Amateur Gem Cutter 45Just Between You and Me, by the Editor ... 46Reviews of Southwestern Literature 47Out of the Dust, by Lois Elder Roy . . back cover
The Desert Magazine
is
published monthly
by the
Desert Press,
Inc.,
Palm Desert,California. Re-entered
as
second class matter July
17, 1948, at the
postoffice
at
Palm Desert,California, under
the Act of
March
3, 1879.
Title registered
No.
358865
in U. S.
Patent Office,and contents copyrighted
1956 by the
Desert Press,
Inc.
Permission
to
reproduce contentsmust
be
secured from
the
editor
in
writing.RANDALL HENDERSON, EditorBESS STACY, Business ManagerEUGENE
L.
CONROTTO, Associate EditorEVONNE RIDDELL, Circulation ManagerUnsolicited manuscripts
and
photographs submitted cannot
be
returned
or
acknowledgedunless full return postage
is
enclosed. Desert Magazine assumes
no
responsibility
for
damage
or
loss
of
manuscripts
or
photographs although
due
care will
be
exercised.
Sub-
scribers should send notice
of
change
of
address
by the
first
of the
month preceding issue.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One
Year $4.00
Two
Years $7.00
Canadian
Subscriptions
25c
Extra,
Foreign
50c
Extra
Subscriptions
to
Army Personnel Outside
U. S. A.
Must
Be
Mailed
in
Conformity WithP.
O. D.
Order
No.
19687Address Correspondence
to
Desert Magazine,
Palm Desert, California
MARCH,
1956

Activity (12)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
claude783 liked this
claude783 liked this
1970lucy liked this
noone8657 liked this
k7sn liked this
Dennis Legge liked this
Greg Mulac liked this
quickone liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->