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195602 Desert Magazine 1956 February

195602 Desert Magazine 1956 February

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Published by dm1937

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Published by: dm1937 on Mar 30, 2008
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Mariposa Lily. Photograph taken by Josef Muench in the Petrified ForestNational Monument of A rizona.
DESERT WARMTH
By SAXON WHITE TAYLOR
Grangeville, IdahoToday my mind is free from care.For 1 am desert bound.I'll inhale the soft warm air,Absorb warmth from the ground.No more ice to gnaw awayThe marrow from my bones;The desert sands I find todayWill case my frozen moans.I'd rather live en desert sandsAlone until I
die,
Than live in far more settled landsWhere drifted snowbanks lie.In drifted sands I'm at my easeIn minimum attire.Give me cactus for my garden, please.And desert sun for fire.
o
RANDOM PATTERN
By ANONA MCCONAGHY
Downey, CaliforniaCrisscrossed tracks in morningBefore wind plies her broom.Reveal nocturnal frolicsIn sand dune rumpus room.
DESERT PEACE
By MARIE L. WEAVER
Ventura, CaliforniaThe desert night hurled down a thousandstarsAnd bathed my soul in quiet ecstasy.From din of bruising city strife I cameTo calmly look, and lo, it rested me.
T>
By TANYA SOUTH
Give me a Dream. And I shall riseAnd struggle upward, daring, doing,Searching with boundless Faith the
skies,
And endlessly my Dream pursuing.Dreams are the core of mortal Fate.They are the root, the source ofMan.No height can be attained, no state,Save one can weave some Dreamto span.
By EVA L. ROBINSON
Los Angeles, CaliforniaIt's true that winter's on the wane,For daylight hours are showing gain.If drab and dry the desert liesBeneath the cold and cloudless skies.I do not moan, for this I know—The desert will awake and glowAs wave on wave of colors flow—If there is rain.I love the desert's calm reposeIn garb of gray and mauve and rose—Its tinted dawn—its sunset skies—Its silent mountain peaks that riseLike sentinels to guard the plain.From all that hunger to obtainPossession of the vast domain—If there is rain.We lift our eyes and pray there willFall blessings from the skies untilThe dormant life without a sound,Springs up in legions from the ground.Buds will appear mysteriously,To bloom in grace and purity,Where there is none but God to see—If there is rain.
UNTOUCHABLE
By GRACE BARKER WILSON
Kirtland, New MexicoThe tawny, untamed desert stretches onIn sandy dryness of unnumbered years.No civilizing thing yet interferesAs endless time is marked from dawn todawn.No point of conquering plow yet penetratesThe wastes that lie around the stony peaksIn desolation. There the redman ekesA meager living as he concentratesHis energy upon a flock of sheepThat draw scant strength from scatteredwisps of grass.Unchanged, unchanging as the decades pass.The frontier stops, and progress is asleep.
BRIGAND
By VADA F. CARLSON
Winslow, ArizonaThe chaparral cock—droll desert cuckoo!—Is an arrogant, feathered brigand,
Who,
having adapted himself to his home.Grows fat on the lean of the land.His diet may shock some folks, but it's trueThat his daily delight is to munchOn lizards and centipedes, spiders and bugs.With a scorpion thrown in for lunch.The shade of a rock, or a cholla, will doFor this bird of the sun and the sand,
Who,
like Robin Hood, does his quota ofgood—Let's give the brave fellow a hand!o
DESERT FLOWERS
By R. C. HYDER
Montebello, CaliforniaWhen atmosphere is crystal clearAnd skies are deepest blue,And desert flowers like clustered bowersWith tints of vivid huelimbrace the earth with fresh new birthAs far as eye can seeWith fragrance sweet, and seem to greetWith gladness, you and me,In splendor fair, I stand and stareWith deep humility,Proud of this land from God's own handHe gave to you and me.
DESERT MAGAZINE
 
DESERT CALENDAR
Feb.
2—Candlemas
Day
CeremonialDances
at San
Felipe, Cochiti
and
Santo Domingo Indian Pueblos,New Mexico.
Feb.
2-5 —
Imperial Valley CarrotFestival, Holtville, California.
Feb.
2-5—$15,000 Open Golf Tour-nament, Phoenix, Arizona.
Feb.
3-5—Parada
del Sol,
Scottsdale,Arizona.
Feb.
4-5 —
Rodeo, sponsored
by
Mounted Police, Palm Springs,California.
Feb.
5—Desert
Sun
Ranchers Rodeo,Wickenburg, Arizona.
Feb.
5—Dons Travelcade
to
Jeromeand Montezuma Castle NationalMonument, from Phoenix, Arizona.
Feb.
6-12 —
Southwestern LivestockShow
and
Rodeo,
El
Paso, Texas.
Feb.
7—Pancake Race, Clayton,
New
Mexico.
Feb.
8-12 —
Open Golf Tournament,Tucson, Arizona.
Feb.
10-11—Square Dance Festivaland Fiddlers Jamboree, Phoenix,Arizona.
Feb.
10-12 —
University
of
NevadaWinter Carnival, Reno
Ski
Bowl.
Feb.
10-12—19th Annual InvitationalTennis Tournament, Racquet Club,Palm Springs, California.
Feb.
10-13 —
Outdoor
Art
Show,Phoenix, Arizona.
Feb.
11-12—Jaycee Silver Spur Rodeo,
Yuma,
Arizona.
Feb.
11-12 —
Western Saddle ClubStampede, Squaw Peak Mountain,Phoenix, Arizona.
Feb.
13—Audubon Screen Tour series,Ogden, Utah.
Feb.
15—Major League Spring Train-ing begins, Giants
at
Phoenix, Cubsat Mesa, Orioles
at
Scottsdale,
In-
dians
at
Tucson.
Feb.
16-19—Western
Air
Force
Con-
ference Four-Way
Ski
Meet, Reno,Nevada,
Ski
Bowl.
Feb.
16-22 —
Riverside County Fairand National Date Festival, Indio,California.
Feb.
17-18—Square Dance Jamboree,St. George, Utah.
Feb.
18-19 —
Indian Dance Show,sponsored
by
Dons Club, Phoenix,Arizona.
Feb.
19-26 —
Ninth Annual CactusShow, Desert Botanical Gardens,Phoenix, Arizona.
Feb.
21-25—Maricopa County Fair,Mesa, Arizona.
Feb.
22-26—Better Homes Exposition,El Paso, Texas.
Feb.
23-26
— La
Fiesta
de los Va-
queros, Annual Rodeo, Tucson,Arizona.
Feb.
25-March
4
California
Mid-
winter Fair, Imperial, California.Mid-February—Mid-Winter
Ski Car-
nival, Aqua Piedra
Ski Run,
Tres
Ritos,
New
Mexico.February—Arts
of the
Navajo, South-west Museum, Highland Park,
Calif.
Volume
19
FEBRUARY,
1956
Number
2
COVERPOETRYCALENDARHISTORYFICTIONEXPERIENCEWILDFLOWERSMININGNATUREBOTANYFIELD TRIPCLOSE-UPSGARDENINGCONTESTPHOTOGRAPHYLOST TREASURELETTERSDESERT QUIZNEWSMININGURANIUMHOBBYLAPIDARYCOMMENTBOOKS
Prickly Pear BlossomsPhotograph by HUBERT LOWMANFebruary and other poems 2February events on the desert 3Bradshaw's Road to the La Paz Diggin'sBy FRANKLIN HOYT 4Hard Rock Shorty of Death Valley 8Before the Law Came to BorregoBy H. E. W. WILSON 9Flowering predictions for February 10They Mine "Living Silver" from the Hills ofNevada, by NELL MURBARGER 11Termites on the DesertBy EDMUND C. JAEGER 16The Vallecitos' Strange TreeBy PHILIP CURTI 17Red Rock Canyon Gem TrailsBy HAROLD O. WEIGHT 18About those who write for Desert 22Potted Plants in a Desert PatioBy RUTH REYNOLDS 23Picture-of-the-month Contest announcement . . 24Pictures of the Month 25Treasure Canyon of the Coso AncientsBy RUSS LEADABRAND 26Comment from Desert's readers 29A test of your desert knowledge 30From here and there on the Desert 31Current News of desert mines 36Progress of the mining boom 37Gems and Minerals 40Amateur Gem Cutter 45Just Between You and Me, by the Editor ... 46Reviews of Southwestern Literature 47
The Desert Magazine
is
published monthly
by the
Desert Press,
Inc.,
Palm Desert,California. Re-entered
as
second class matter July
17. 1948, at the
postoffice
at
Palm Desert,California, under
the Act of
March
3, 1870.
Title registered
No.
358865
in U. S.
Patent Office,and contents copyrighted
1956 by the
Desert Press,
Inc.
Permission
to
reproduce contentsmust
be
secured from
the
editor
in
writing.RANDALL HENDERSON, EditorBESS STACY, Business ManagerEUGENE
L.
CONROTTO, Associate EditorBVONNE RIDDELL, Circulation ManagerUnsolicited manuscripts
and
photographs submitted cannot
be
returned
or
acknowledgedunless full return postage
is
enclosed. Desert Magazine assumes
no
responsibility
for
damage
or
loss
of
manuscripts
or
photographs although
due
care will
be
exercised.
Sub-
scribers should send notice
of
change
of
address
by the
first
of the
month preceding issue.
SUBSCRIPTION KATESOne Year S4.00
Two
Years $7.00Canadian Subscriptions
25c
Extra, Foreign
50c
Extra
Subscriptions
to
Army Personnel Outside
U. S. A.
Must
Be
Mailed
in
Conformity With
P.
O. D.
Order
No.
19687
Address Correspondence
to
Desert
Magazine, Palm Desert, California
FEBRUARY, 1956

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