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Sugar and the Origins of Modern Philippine Society

Sugar and the Origins of Modern Philippine Society

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Published by Bert M Drona
Recently, the Philippine people have endured a series of harsh blows—from nature in the form of earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, killer typhoons, and floods and from the government through its mismanagement, abuse, neglect, and corruption. Such events have saddened me considerably, for during my many years of study in and about this country I have developed a great affection and admiration for its citizens. They have been open and hospitable to me, and I can only offer this book as a token of my appreciation. Here I try to explain in what I think is a sympathetic fashion how colonialism and the international export economy shaped their lives. Hopefully, with the ebbing of neocolonialism, Filipinos can put the larger control of their own destiny more to the service of the many. They deserve a better fate. - author JOHN A. LARKIN
Recently, the Philippine people have endured a series of harsh blows—from nature in the form of earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, killer typhoons, and floods and from the government through its mismanagement, abuse, neglect, and corruption. Such events have saddened me considerably, for during my many years of study in and about this country I have developed a great affection and admiration for its citizens. They have been open and hospitable to me, and I can only offer this book as a token of my appreciation. Here I try to explain in what I think is a sympathetic fashion how colonialism and the international export economy shaped their lives. Hopefully, with the ebbing of neocolonialism, Filipinos can put the larger control of their own destiny more to the service of the many. They deserve a better fate. - author JOHN A. LARKIN

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Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: Bert M Drona on Dec 13, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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08/18/2014

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Sugar and the Origins of Modern Philippine Society
C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z 
Source:
Sugar and the Origins of Modern Philippine Society - John A. Larkin (1992)
http://www.escholarship.org/editions/view?docId=ft4580066d;brand=ucpress 
 
Sugar and the Origins of Modern Philippine SocietyPreface
Recently, the Philippine people have endured a series of harsh blows—from nature inthe form of earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, killer typhoons, and floods and from thegovernment through its mismanagement, abuse, neglect, and corruption. Such eventshave saddened me considerably, for during my many years of study in and about thiscountry
I have developed a great affection and admiration for its citizens. Theyhave been open and hospitable to me, and I can only offer this book as a token of my appreciation
. Here I try to explain in what I think is a sympathetic fashion howcolonialism and the international export economy shaped their lives.
Hopefully, with theebbing of neocolonialism, Filipinos can put the larger control of their own destinymore to the service of the many. They deserve a better fate.
A book of this dimension could not exist but for the assistance of many friends andorganizations. As always, the late Adelina Ventura and her children, now scattered to thewinds, supplied a roof, encouragement, or a quick translation whenever I appealed tothem. Norman Owen, Ben Kerkvliet, Yoshiko Nagano, and Ronald R. Edgerton readportions of the manuscript and gave me the benefit of their valuable comments. SheilaLevine eased the process of moving the manuscript along to publication, and DougPerrelli patiently created meaningful maps from my imperfect directions. Dore Brown andJoanne Sandstrom did an excellent job preparing the manuscript for publication. SerafinQuiason, my
kabalen
, offered me special access to Pampanga and loaned me theservices of the able Roland Bayhon to lighten the burden of archival work. LinaConcepcion not only opened the Philippine National Archives to me, she also listenedsympathetically to the problems of a struggling researcher. And Janet Baglier, my wife,did the major handholding that saw this book to completion. It is customary to absolvethe above for any errors in the text, and I do so; as well, there are certainly fewer mistakes because of them.Others who supplied either materials, expertise, or moral support include the lateDomingo Abella, John and Myrna Adkins, Marysol Aizpuro, Dorothy Baglier, CharlesBryant, Nita and Jim Burris, Linda Casper, Amado Castro, Rosendo Coruña (of SPCMA), Nicholas Cushner, Marina Dayrit, Noel de Paula, Eden Divinagracia, EvelynDizon, the late Fred Eggan, Oscar and Susan Evangelista, Doreen Fernandez, the lateFrank Golay, Mitchell Harwitz, Namnama Hidalgo, Karl Hutterer, Natividad Jardiel, theresidents of Jesuit House in Chicago, Carl Landé, Emma Larkin, Judith Larkin, SarahLarkin, Sean Larkin, La Salle Brothers of Bacolod, Violeta Lopez Gonzaga, StephenMoscov, Barbara Nowak, Mario Nuñez, Akil Pawaki, Kathleen Revelle, the J. B. L.Reyes family, Norman Schul, the Smith, Bell & Co. staff, Wilhelm Solheim, the late TonyTan, and Pedro Tison.Grants for time away from teaching came from the American Council of LearnedSocieties, the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies at the University of Hawaii, the U.S.Department of Education (Fulbright Office), and the State University of New York atBuffalo. The School of Economics at the University of the Philippines, Diliman, loanedme an office for a year and facilitated my interaction with its knowledgeable staff.Unfailingly the staffs at the following repositories assisted me in my search for obscurematerials: Newberry Library, Lilly Library, Lockwood Library (SUNY/Buffalo), Colgate-
Source:
Sugar and the Origins of Modern Philippine Society - John A. Larkin (1992)
http://www.escholarship.org/editions/view?docId=ft4580066d;brand=ucpress 

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