Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more ➡
Standard view
Full view
of .
Add note
Save to My Library
Sync to mobile
Look up keyword
Like this
3Activity
×
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Inside Biotech, 2007

Inside Biotech, 2007

Ratings:

5.0

(2)
|Views: 3,690|Likes:
Published by i-people

More info:

Published by: i-people on Mar 31, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
See More
See less

11/20/2012

 
crawl. These creatures proved thatslowing the aging process alsoreduced the formation of toxic betaamyloid aggregates. The findingopens the door for development of drugs preventing build-up of toxicprotein aggregates in the brain. While aging is the greatest riskfactor for Alzheimer’s disease,another study this year by PaulSawchenko, a professor in theNeuronal Structure and FunctionLaboratory, suggests that low levelsof stress, the kind we experienceeach day, can also contribute to theonset of Alzheimer’s disease.The findings showed how the brain-damaging effects of negativeemotions lead to a molecular chainreaction that cause modification of the tau protein, which collapsesinto insoluble fibers inside neurons.This ultimately leads to cell death.Currently, drugs in Stage 2 clinicaltrials for the treatment of depres-sion and other mood disorders tar-get the same receptors involved inSawchenko’s study.“We may have discovered anotherapplication,” Sawchenko said. “Suchdrugs could have a prophylacticeffect or delay the progression of  Alzheimer’s disease.”
Thursday, October 18, 2007
 / Vol. 122, No. 209
sddt.com/biotech07
Photo: J. Kat Woronowicz 
Eri
 
c L
 
o
 
umeau (lef 
 
t) of law firm Min
 
t
 
z, Levin
 
, Co
 
hn, Ferris, Glo
 
 vsky and P
 
o
 
p
 
eo PC, and Chris Burnley of Ph
 
en
 
omi
 
x C
 
or
 
p. w
 
er
 
e am
 
on
 
g th
 
e par
 
ti
 
ci
 
p
 
an
 
ts i
 
n a r
 
ecen
 
t bio
 
t
 
e
 
ch ro
 
un
 
dt
 
able h
 
oste
 
d by 
Th
 
e D 
 
 
 
 
 y Tr 
 
 
n
 
 
cri 
 
 pt 
 
.
Pa
 
g
 
e 6
Local life science industrybreeds ‘serial entrepreneurs’
New companies, ideas,capital investments boonto regional economy
By SY
 
DNIE MO
 
OR
 
E
Special to the Daily Transcript 
Forty years ago, no one couldhave guessed that San Diego wouldone day be a Mecca for a robust biotechnology industry. But with atroika of internationally renownedacademic centers — The SalkInstitute, University of California,San Diego and Scripps ResearchInstitute — San Diego was poisedfor a biotech explosion. According to Joe Panetta, presi-dent of BIOCOM, the SouthernCalifornia life science association,San Diego now boasts more than500 biotech and medical technolo-gy companies — constituting thepharmaceutical, diagnostic andmedical device industries — with a work force of 37,000 and an annu-al economic impact of $8.5 billion.In fact, San Diego is among the topthree regions in the country for biotech, closing in on the SanFrancisco Bay Area and Boston. A bi
 
ot
 
e
 
ch l
 
e
 
g
 
a
 
cy  Along with the city’s academicpowerhouses, also paving the way for San Diego’s burgeoning biotechcluster was Hybritech, a medicaldiagnostic company founded by in1978 by UCSD researchers IvorRoyston and Howard Birndorf.“Hybritech was the first real biotech firm in San Diego,” saysHoward E. “Ted” Greene, whoserved as its CE0 from 1979 until1986, when it was acquired by EliLilly an
 
d C
 
o
 
.(NYSE: ELI).Hybritech indisputably helpedfuel San Diego’s blockbuster lifesciences industry.“More than 100 San Diego com-panies have been related toHybritech in some way,” saysPanetta, and many of today’s CEOs were originally at Hybritech.”In fact, the Hybritech alumni listincludes an impressive list of heavy hitters who have gone on to launcha series of successful ventures,includingLi
 
gan
 
d(Nasdaq:LGND), Idec Pharmaceuticals,Dura, Gensia,Neur
 
o
 
cri
 
neBios
 
ci
 
enc
 
e
 
s(Nasdaq: NBIX),Immune Response, Vi
 
a
 
g
 
e
 
ne
 
, G
 
e
 
n-Pr
 
ob
 
e(Nasdaq: GPRO), N
 
an
 
og
 
en(Nasdaq: NGEN), Gen
 
optix,E
 
pimmune, Bi
 
osit
 
e(Nasdaq:BSTE), S
 
omax
 
on(Nasdaq: SOMX)and many others.L
 
ay 
 
in
 
g t
 
he gr
 
ound
 
 w
 
orkIn this spirit, Hybritech also setthe stage for an enduring phenom-enon: “serial entrepreneurship,”another catalyst for San Diego’s white-hot biotech industry. According to Panetta, a serialentrepreneur launches a new busi-ness after having already startedand exited a previous venture, incontrast with someone who starts asingle company and operates it as alifelong career.
 A self-described “serial entrepre-neur,” Greene has participated inthe founding or management of 11medical technology companies.Following his tenure at Hybritech,he co-founded AmylinPh
 
a
 
rma
 
c
 
eut
 
i
 
cal
 
s(Nasdaq: AMLN)— a diabetes drug developer now valued at $6 billion and the largestindependent biotech in San Diego— and ran Biovest Partners, a ven-ture capital fund that provided seedfunding for a half dozen local SanDiego biotech and medical devicecompanies, including Biosite, Amylin, Pyxis, Vi
 
c
 
a
 
l(Nasdaq: VICL) andCyt
 
el
 
.
Like Greene, Cam Garner, alsoonce a key player at Hybritech, is aprototypical serial entrepreneur. After leaving Hybritech, he wasCEO of Dura Pharmaceuticals for10 years, which in 2001 was sold toE
 
la
 
n C
 
orp.(NYSE: ELN) in a stockdeal valued at $1.8 billion.Since Dura, Garner has gone onto launch or invest in a successionof local specialty pharmaceuticalfirms, including XcelPharmaceuticals, SkinMe
 
di
 
c
 
a
 
,Somaxon Ph
 
a
 
rm
 
a
 
c
 
eut
 
i
 
cal
 
s(Nasdaq: SOMX) andCad
 
enc
 
ePh
 
a
 
rma
 
ce
 
ut
 
i
 
c
 
a
 
l
 
s(Nasdaq: CADX).In 2002, Garner and several part-ners launched V 
 
erusPharma
 
c
 
eut
 
i
 
ca
 
l
 
s
 
, a pediatric-ori-ented company with an initial focuson the treatment of asthma, aller-gies and related diseases and con-ditions. The company announcedan unprecedented $98 million infinancing in 2005.N
 
e
 
 w
 
er ge
 
ne
 
ra
 
t
 
i
 
on cont
 
inu
 
e
 
st
 
he t
 
r
 
a
 
diti
 
on A more recent example of a suc-cessful serial entrepreneurship isRandall E. Woods, a former EliLilly executive who in Septembersold NovaCardia Inc., a firmfocused on cardiovascular disease,to pharmaceutical giantMe
 
rck(NYSE: MRK) for a total purchaseprice of $366.4 million.“Not bad for a little company  with 11 employees,” said Panetta.In the true entrepreneurial spirit, Woods has “now moved on,”Panetta said, and just received $20million in financing to launch spin-off Se
 
qu
 
el Pha
 
rma
 
ce
 
uti
 
c
 
a
 
ls
 
.
“Both NovaCardia’s senior man-agement team and investors joinedSequel, a testament to everyone’sconfidence in Randy and his leader-ship,” said Brian Farmer, vice presi-dent of corporate development andoperations for Sequel, and a former business development executive with NovaCardia.
“With a proven track record of licensing and developing drug can-didates for cardiovascular disease, we are pleased to support theSequel management team,” saidEckard Weber, a partner atD
 
omain As
 
so
 
ci
 
a
 
t
 
e
 
s, which helped financeSequel.
 Also recently joining the ranks of San Diego’s biotech legends isSteven J. Mento, a microbiologist who in 2005 sold his company Idun— specializing in the treatment of liver damage — to New York-basedindustry leaderP
 
fi
 
z
 
er(NYSE: PFE)for $300 million in cash. Mento went on to foundC
 
onatu
 
sPharma
 
ceuti
 
cal
 
s— a specialty pharmaceutical company engagedin the development of human ther-apeutics to treat liver disease.
Driv 
 
en by id
 
e
 
a
 
s What drives dynamos likeGarner, Greene, Woods and Mentoto persevere?In addition to some hefty finan-cial incentives, they are certainly motivated by science — and for- ward-thinking ideas.Typically, said Greene, those whostart new biotech ventures aremore interested in the productthan in operating a company. “I liketo figure out the product and don’t want to worry about sales, manu-facturing or facilities,” he said.“Guys like me don’t like living in
Private investors give vote of confidence to stem cell bonds
By ROMAN JIME
 
NE
 
Z
Special to the Daily Transcript 
 When California voters over- whelmingly passed Proposition 71in 2004, a $3 billion bond initiativeto fund the state’s emerging embry-onic stem cell research program,some wondered how enthusiasticindividual investors would be to buy those bonds.The answer came on Oct. 3 whenState Treasurer Bill Lockyerannounced the first round of bondsales, some $250 million, had con-cluded. According to Lockyer, indi- vidual investors accounted for 41.1percent of the total, or $102.8 mil-lion. According to the Treasurer’soffice, individual investors wereonly expected to account for around13 percent of the bond commit-ment.“The investment by individualsfar exceeded our expectations andshows how strongly Californians believe in the promise of stem cellresearch to cure diseases andrelieve suffering,” Lockyer said in a
 Latest discoveries at Salk Institute fuel new scientific questions
Source: Salk Institute 
Situated high above the bluffs inTorrey Pines and overlooking thePacific Ocean, the Salk Institute was founded in 1960 as a place where some of the world’s brightestminds would come together for thecommon goal of scientific discovery.Its 59 faculty members, includingthree resident Nobel Laureates,have kept founder Dr. Jonas Salk’s vision alive by contributing seminal breakthroughs in basic biologicalresearch in three general areas of science: Molecular Biology andGenetics; Neurosciences; and PlantBiology. Their discoveries have con-tinued to provide clues toward bet-ter understanding the molecularorigins behind some of today’s mostdevastating diseases including can-cer, AIDS/HIV, Alzheimer’s andother neurodegenerative diseases.Some of the most recent discov-eries have provided insight into theunderpinnings of Alzheimer’s dis-ease, a condition that riddles the brain with debilitating beta amyloidplaques and neurofibrillary tangles. A study by Andrew Dillin, an asso-ciate professor in the Molecular andCell Biology Laboratory, showedhow aging impedes the brain’s abil-ity to clear away toxic proteinaggregates.Dillin and his team employed thehelp of tiny Methuselah wormsthat, despite their advanced age,still have a youthful spring in their
Photo courtesy of Salk Institute 
The Salk In
 
st
 
itut
 
e
 
, ov 
 
erl
 
o
 
okin
 
g t
 
he oc
 
ea
 
n in L
 
a J
 
oll
 
a
 
, support
 
s 59 f 
 
a
 
cult
 
 y me
 
mb
 
er
 
s a
 
nd a s
 
ci
 
e
 
ntifi
 
c st
 
af 
 
f of mor
 
e t
 
ha
 
n 850 conduct
 
ing bi
 
ol
 
ogi
 
cal r
 
e
 
s
 
ear
 
ch
 
.
See
Salk Institute
on 8
Roundtable discussion
See
Entrepreneurs
on 8
Source: San Diego Workforce Partnership 
San Diego is home to the world’s third-largest biotechnology industry. With the success of this segment has come work force sup-ply demands that pose a two-fold challenge to the region: How do we motivate and prepare our youth to fill jobs that require an edu-cational competitive edge in the fields of math, technology, life sci-ences and others demanded by the industry? How do we arm teach-ers with real-world curriculum that brings the classroom in line with the occupational requirements of an ever-evolving industry?One solution to creating a biotech work force talent pool has beenunderway since the summer of 2005: the Life Sciences SummerInstitute. LSSI connects upper-level high school, university andcommunity college students, as well as high school teachers, withleading companies within San Diego’s life sciences community.“The LSSI programs are working,” said Ashley Wildrick, specialinitiatives program manager of the San Diego WorkforcePartnership, “and we have results to prove it. High school students who lacked direction now see the life sciences as a potential careerpath; college students are being placed into internships that lead topart-time and full-time positions; and research performed in par-ticipant companies, as a result of the mentorship process, has yield-ed patents that may influence additional job creation.”Students gained exposure to career options, hands-on laboratory experience, work readiness skills and mentoring by a company orresearch scientist. But first, they went through Biotech “Boot Camp,”an introduction to biotechnology laboratory work held at theSouthern California Biotechnology Center at Miramar College, sup-plemented by materials and supplies fromInvit
 
ro
 
ge
 
n Corp.(Nasdaq: IVGN). For each student, a paid internship within the lifesciences industry followed.One such student, Aditi Sharma, completed the program thissummer and carried out an internship atPf 
 
i
 
z
 
e
 
r(NYSE: PFE). Thecompany then hired her part-time, while she completes bio-medicalengineering studies at UCSD.“My internship has given me the chance to apply the knowledgelearned at school and gain a deeper appreciation and hands-onunderstanding of cancer biology and its implications for scientificprogress of the future,” Sharma said. “I have developed confidence inmy skills as a scientist and researcher, developed fundamental labo-ratory skills and the soft skills essential in the working world, and
Growing thebiotech work force
See
Work force
on 7 
statement. A total of 18 institutionalinvestors (such as mutual funds, banks or insurance companies) bought the balance of the $250 mil-lion. Bonds were sold Oct. 3 and 4.Samuel H. Wood, M.D., CEO of St
 
ema
 
g
 
en
 
, a privately held embry-onic stem cell research company, was also pleased with the level of individual investor participation,calling it a “smart and progressiveinvestment.”“The public funding of humanembryonic stem cell researchmakes good fiscal sense. Paying tofind a cure or treatment to a diseasetoday is far less costly than trying tomanage any disease long term,” Wood added. “It’s easier on the pub-lic purse, but most importantly, itholds the promise of easing patientsuffering.”Stemagen has established itself as a leader in the field of stem cellresearch, already creating eightlines of embryonic stem cells fromembryos that were excess of repro-ductive need. The company has alsocreated multiple lines of embryonicstem cells from unfertilizedembryos incapable of reproduction.These “uniparental embryos” arecreated by artificially activating an
See
Stem cell
on 8
Supplement to:
Inside Biotech
 
3
T
HURSDAY
, O
CTOBER
18, 2007 
Inside Biotech
T
HE
D
 AILY
T
RANSCRIPT
Close-up: Stanley Crooke
Isis uses antisense technology to target more effective drugs
B
 
y M
 
IC
 
H
 
AE
 
L KL
 
A
 
M
Special to the Daily Transcript 
Drug development is risky busi-ness. In the biotech industry, 999out of 1,000 drugs targeted fordevelopment will fail, according toDr. Stanley Crooke, CEO of Isi
 
sPh
 
a
 
rma
 
c
 
eut
 
i
 
cal
 
s
 
.The Carlsbad-based company’ssuccesses, including its develop-ment of antisense technology andits progress in infectious diseasediagnosis, represent a boon for thecompany and the entire industry.For the rest of us, these advance-ments could result in easier, longerand healthier lives.Here’s the general idea: Cancerand many cardiovascular, meta- bolic and inflammatory diseasesoccur due to overproduction orabnormal production of proteins.Isis developed antisense technolo-gy to target specific areas and todisrupt the body’s process in creat-ing these undesired proteins.“Drug discovery and develop-ment is about making patients better, effecting cures and alteringthe course of chronic diseases,”said Crooke, who co-founded Isis(Nasdaq: ISIS) in 1989. “That’s what I’ve done with my life, and(antisense technology) is simply atotally novel approach.” After 18 years and about $2 bil-lion spent, Crooke and his col-leagues have revolutionized theindustry.“The key difference is that youcreate a new class of drugs, design-ing them to bind to a class of tar-gets that have never been targeted by drugs before: messenger RNA,”said Crooke. “And you use geneticinformation to make a precise ZIPcode to specifically attack one, andonly one, messenger RNA.”This specificity means rapiddiagnosis, faster healing and lessside effects. Essentially, the tech-nology goes straight to the sourceof the problem, tackles it and pre- vents growth of the disease whilepromoting healing.“Drugs are just tools that we putin the body to do a particular job,”said Crooke. “As a general rule, themore specific a drug is, the betterit is, the safer it is, and the moreeffective it is.”Crooke’s interest in antisensetechnology sparked while helpingto establish Bri
 
st
 
ol-M
 
eye
 
r’s anti-cancer drug discovery and devel-opment program. Prior to found-ing Isis, he also served as presidentof research and development forSmithK 
 
l
 
in
 
e B
 
e
 
ckman C
 
orp., wherehe coordinated the company’sR&D activities in instruments,diagnostics, animal health andclinical labs. With the backing of a number of  venture capitalists, Crooke createdIsis to pursue the dream of “creat-ing a new platform for drug dis-covery that will enhance produc-tivity and make better drugs,” hesaid.The platform has since support-ed 17 drugs in development andone drug on the market to treat a wide range of diseases. Isis, on aper-capita basis, is the most prolif-ic innovator of any company indrug-development history, accord-ing to Crooke. The Isis team hasissued 1,600 patents and has 3,500patent applications in process.“Every year, when patentroundups are considered, we rankalong with the IBMs, the Xeroxesand the like,” Crooke said. “Whatthat reflects is the level of innova-tion in the company and our com-mitment to tackling big ideas andstaying the course.”Through its wholly owned sub-sidiary Ibi
 
s Bi
 
os
 
cie
 
n
 
ce
 
s Inc
 
., Isiscreated a second technology calledthe Ibis T5000 that the company  believes will radically changeinfectious disease diagnosis, mak-ing it more efficient.“It’s estimated that if the T5000had been up and running at time of SARS,” Crooke said, “it would havetaken us two patients and two daysto learn that it was a viral disease,that it was different than anythingthat had been seen, and that thelast time something like it was seen was in China two years earlier.”The biosensor system enablesrapid identification of bacterial, viral, fungal and other infectiousorganisms, as well as analysis of human DNA. Isis plans to eventu-ally spin off the technology, andIbis Biosciences is a candidate formerger or acquisition, Crooke said.The company also announced inSeptember that it had been award-ed $4.2 million in governmentcontracts to Ibis for biodefenseapplications.“We are pleased with the ongo-ing government support and theopportunity to continue toadvance our technology and appli-cations in the biodefense arena,”said Michael Treble, president of Ibis and vice president of Isis, in apress release. “These contractssupport the Ibis business model tocommercialize the Ibis T5000 inmultiple business sectors, includ-ing government biodefense andinfectious disease surveillance,health care-associated infectioncontrol, infectious diseaseresearch and, in the future, in vitrodiagnostics.”Isis’ products and technology have made it one of the mostsought-out biotech companies inits field. In July, Isis announced it would receive $26.5 million fromCambridge, Mass.-based Alnyl
 
a
 
mPh
 
arm
 
a
 
ceuti
 
cal
 
sunder a patentlicensing agreement. The compa-ny most recently received $5 mil-lion to begin phase 1 of a study  with Johns
 
on & John
 
son(NYSE:JNJ) on ISIS 325568, a diabetesdrug candidate.“We’re being sought out actively  because we have products that areunique and technology that is pro-foundly revolutionary,” Crookesaid. “And the evidence for that isthe deals that we’ve done this year.Isis acquired Symphony Genesisfor $120 million in late Septemberand received part of a $1.2 millionNational Institutes of Health(NIH) grant to use the Ibis T5000in influenza surveillance research.“There are companies that havealigned with us that we’ve provid-ed selective access to our patents, but our goal has been — and we’vesucceeded in this — to be in con-trol of the platforms,” Crooke said.“We’ve created quite a number of partnerships with larger compa-nies.”Isis has also granted technology to smaller companies to focus onspecific elements, therapeuticareas or technology that would becomplementary to Isis projects.
Photo: J. Kat Woronowicz 
“Dru
 
g di
 
sc
 
ov 
 
e
 
ry an
 
d devel
 
opment i
 
s ab
 
out m
 
a
 
kin
 
g pa
 
t
 
i
 
ent
 
s bet
 
t
 
er, ef 
 
fe
 
ct
 
i
 
n
 
g cur
 
es and alt
 
e
 
rin
 
g t
 
he cour
 
s
 
e of chr
 
onic dise
 
a
 
s
 
e
 
s
 
,” s
 
ai
 
d St
 
a
 
nl
 
ey Cr
 
o
 
ok
 
e, CE
 
O of I
 
si
 
s Ph
 
a
 
rma
 
ce
 
ut
 
i
 
ca
 
l
 
s.
“This brings the greatest value toour shareholders and the greatest value to the widest range of patients,” Crooke said.The company has received posi-tive results from its phase 2 clini-cal trial of its cholesterol-loweringdrug candidate ISIS 301012,recently given the generic name of mipomersen sodium. Drugs thatlower cholesterol — such asPfiz
 
e
 
r’s (NYSE: PFE) Lipitor, which reaped $13 billion in salesin 2006 — tend to be the mostprofitable for pharmaceuticalcompanies. If successful, mipom-ersen sodium could lead Isis intoprofitability. The company report-ed a loss of $68.1 million in 2006.
Still, Isis’ stock performance inrecent years seems to reflectinvestors’ confidence in its drugpipeline and recognition of whatthe company has accomplished.
Success in dynamic VCbiotech environment
By LA
 
UR
 
A SH
 
AW
 
V
 
E
 
Ran
 
d C
 
H
 
RIS B
 
UR
 
NLEY
Phenomix Corp.
 Venture-capital funding is nec-essary to drive biotechnology. Without this support, the devel-opment of protein-based thera-pies from recombinant DNA tech-nology and repurposing mono-clonal antibodies from basicresearch may never have beenapplied to the wide range of human diseases. In the hopes of high rewards, venture capital is willing to fund novel, high-riskideas, which are also at high riskof failure.San Diego biotechnology com-panies have been in a mix of goodand bad news. According toErnstand Young, San Diego finished2006 in second place for biotech venture-capital funding, ahead of the Boston-Cambridge area and behind the four sub-regions of theSan Francisco Bay Area.Biotechnology also secured thelead over other sectors in venturecapital raised in the first quarterof this year, but this amount was a40 percent drop compared to last year. So how does a company attract venture capitalists andcontinue to build its business when times are tough?B
 
e a
 
d
 
apt
 
a
 
 bl
 
e
 
,m
 
axi
 
mi
 
z
 
e str
 
en
 
gt
 
h
 
s While it may take 10 to 12 yearsto bring a drug to market, the venture capital funding environ-ment in biotechnology is very dynamic. New discoveries, tech-nologies and business models areconstantly creating an evolutionof ideas and excitement. A com-pany must maintain a vision for building value, but flexibility andadaptability are key elements forsuccess.Ph
 
enomix Corp., a San Diego biotechnology company, providesa good example. The company  was founded in 2002 based onforward genetics, a technique that was the basis of three Nobel Prize Awards. At that time, venturecapital was highly attracted tousing genetic technologies tounderstand human diseases. Theforward genetics platform could be partnered with other drug dis-covery companies, and in turnthis could fund Phenomix’ owndrug discovery and developmentprograms.
Shortly after Phenomix wasfounded, private-equity fundsshifted their focus from platformtechnologies to drug develop-ment. In-licensing became a pop-ular strategy for biotechnology companies to enter into drugdevelopment. This business model became known as NRDO (noresearch, development only). While new companies could startup as NRDOs, Phenomix wasestablished based on a specifictechnology and had to find anoth-er way to adapt to survive in thisfunding environment.
Instead of rebuilding the com-pany, Phenomix figured out howto apply its technology and exper-tise to leap into drug develop-ment. The company took animportant aspect of the technolo-gy — the early use of animal mod-els to assess how a drug works ormight work — and crossed it witha medicinal chemistry approachto quickly discover better drugsfor human diseases.Today, Phenomix has two leadprograms for treatment of dia- betes and hepatitis C virus infec-tion, which combined affect morethan 25 million people in theUnited States. Phenomix hassecured one of the highest levelsof venture-capital support in SanDiego and thrived in the dynamicfunding environment by analyz-ing the company’s strengths andadapting accordingly. The compa-ny has focused on high-valuetherapeutic targets with largecommercial opportunities andthen worked rapidly to secureintellectual property and inventimproved compounds.Buil
 
d r
 
el
 
a
 
ti
 
on
 
ship
 
s,communi
 
cat
 
e re
 
gularl
 
 y There are many different waysto obtain venture-funding.Knowing the investing principlesfor each venture capital firm is anobvious step, but understanding
See
VC biotech
on 8See
Crooke
on 8

Activity (3)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
Sheila Ann liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->