Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
6Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Power And Roads For Africa

Power And Roads For Africa

Ratings:

4.5

(4)
|Views: 560|Likes:
CGD senior fellow Vijaya Ramachandran argues in this essay that the next U.S. president can play a valuable role in helping Africa to overcome two crucial barriers to poverty reduction: lack of power and lack of roads. Ramachandran urges the next president to create a $1 billion Clean Energy Fund for Africa to facilitate the transfer of U.S. infrastructure technology, including renewable energy; and to encourage the World Bank and the African Development Bank to focus on cross-country regional infrastructure projects, also with a strong emphasis on clean technology. The essay is included in a forthcoming CGD volume: The White House and the World: A Global Development Agenda for the Next U.S. President.
CGD senior fellow Vijaya Ramachandran argues in this essay that the next U.S. president can play a valuable role in helping Africa to overcome two crucial barriers to poverty reduction: lack of power and lack of roads. Ramachandran urges the next president to create a $1 billion Clean Energy Fund for Africa to facilitate the transfer of U.S. infrastructure technology, including renewable energy; and to encourage the World Bank and the African Development Bank to focus on cross-country regional infrastructure projects, also with a strong emphasis on clean technology. The essay is included in a forthcoming CGD volume: The White House and the World: A Global Development Agenda for the Next U.S. President.

More info:

Published by: Center for Global Development on Mar 31, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

03/29/2013

pdf

text

original

 
CENTER
 
FOR
 
GLOBAL
 
DEVELOPMENT
ESSAY 
Central to the issue of growth is the development of the private sector. Without the creation of jobsand businesses, there is no real chance for Africans to raise their standard of living. Extensivesurveys of private sector businesses carried out over the past decade show that the poorperformance of the private sector can be largely attributed to the high costs of the businessenvironment. This essay looks at how the United States can help address two key constraintsidentified by these surveys: the lack of power and roads. The United States can help solve theinfrastructure crisis in Africa by creating a $1 billion Clean Energy Fund for Africa to facilitate thetransfer of clean technology, including renewable energy, from the United States to Africa.It should encourage the African Development Bank to focus solely on regional infrastructureprojects, in return for which the United States should increase its capital contribution to theorganization by 25 percent per year for each of the next four years. And it must ensure that theWorld Bank increases its allocation toward
regional 
infrastructure projects in Africa, with a strongemphasis on clean technology, making this a central mission of its soft loan window.
Power and Roads for Africa
www.cgdev.org
The Center for Global Development is an independent think tank that works to reduce global poverty andinequality through rigorous research and active engagement with the policy community. Use and disseminationof this Essay is encouraged, however reproduced copies may not be used for commercial purposes. Furtherusage is permitted under the terms of the Creative Commons License. The views expressed in this paper arethose of the author and should not be attributed to the directors or funders of the Center for Global Development.
By Vijaya RamachandranMarch 2008
 ABSTRACT
www.cgdev
 
.org
 
 POWER AND ROADS FOR AFRICA*Vijaya Ramachandran
*Parts of this chapter are excerpted from a forthcoming CGD publication on Africa’s private sector. I amgrateful to Manju Kedia Shah, Robin Kraft, and Sarah Rose for their contributions, and to Nancy Birdsall,Lawrence MacDonald, Dennis de Tray, Kim Elliott, Michael Clemens, David Wheeler, and Joshua Lozmanfor helpful comments and suggestions.
 
 2
 Introduction
The past decade has witnessed a rapid increase in aid to sub-Saharan Africa. In the firstfour years of the Bush administration, aid levels reached over $4 billion a year,representing almost 20 percent of the total aid budget and a fourfold increase from theyear 2000. Two ambitious new initiatives—the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDSRelief (PEPFAR) and the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC)—were launched toaddress the continent’s health and development needs. In 2001, the Africa Growth andOpportunity Act (AGOA) was implemented to provide African businesses with betteraccess to the U.S. market. Along with other such initiatives, media interest in Africa hasalso grown, and the public has expressed its support for Africa’s economic and socialdevelopment through consumer campaigns such as Product Red and public events.Why does economic growth in Africa matter to the United States? For two simplereasons—it’s the right thing to do AND the smart thing to do. There is increasing publicinterest in the U.S. as well as bipartisan support for helping Africa, as recently witnessedby renewed funding for PEPFAR. Furthermore, there are several new opportunities forU.S. firms to compete, particularly in the area of renewable energy.A perceptible increase in GDP per capita growth in sub-Saharan Africa (hereafterreferred to as Africa) since 2003 has relieved some of the Afro-pessimism so prevalent indebates about Africa’s prospects. Some countries that are not resource-rich are doingvery well: Benin, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Ghana, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique,Rwanda, Senegal, Tanzania, and Uganda are growing at over 5 percent a year (Gelb andTurner 2007). Another group of countries is growing at even higher rates, albeit with thehelp of oil and other resource commodities. (Figure 1 shows that most of the increase inexports of AGOA-eligible countries comes from oil-related products.) But not allcountries have done well, and there is uncertainty about whether even the successfuleconomies will be able to sustain their gains, given their possible dependence on specialfactors, such as aid or temporary terms-of-trade windfalls. Meanwhile, the larger issue of 2

Activity (6)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
miten.dutia liked this
ehkereiakes liked this
Uzebu Ekuase liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->