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Financial Cost of REDD

Financial Cost of REDD

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Published by yeangdonal
The Financial Costs of REDD:
Evidence from Brazil and Indonesia
Nathalie Olsen and Joshua Bishop
December 2009

About IUCN IUCN, International Union for Conservation of Nature, helps the world find pragmatic solutions to our most pressing environment and development challenges. IUCN works on biodiversity, climate change, energy, human livelihoods and greening the world economy by supporting scientific research, managing field projects all over the world, and bringing governments, NGOs, the UN a
The Financial Costs of REDD:
Evidence from Brazil and Indonesia
Nathalie Olsen and Joshua Bishop
December 2009

About IUCN IUCN, International Union for Conservation of Nature, helps the world find pragmatic solutions to our most pressing environment and development challenges. IUCN works on biodiversity, climate change, energy, human livelihoods and greening the world economy by supporting scientific research, managing field projects all over the world, and bringing governments, NGOs, the UN a

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Published by: yeangdonal on Dec 15, 2009
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The Financial Costs of REDD:
Evidence from Brazil and Indonesia
 
Nathalie Olsen and Joshua Bishop
December 2009
 
 
About IUCN
IUCN, International Union for Conservation of Nature, helps the world find pragmatic solutions to our mostpressing environment and development challenges.IUCN works on biodiversity, climate change, energy, human livelihoods and greening the world economy bysupporting scientific research, managing field projects all over the world, and bringing governments, NGOs, theUN and companies together to develop policy, laws and best practice.IUCN is the world’s oldest and largest global environmental organization, with more than 1,000 government andNGO members and almost 11,000 volunteer experts in some 160 countries. IUCN’s work is supported by over1,000 staff in 60 offices and hundreds of partners in public, NGO and private sectors around the world.www.iucn.org 
Rio Tinto
Rio Tinto has supported the research and development of this paper as part of its collaboration with IUCN and togain a better understanding of ecosystem markets as a business issue. Rio Tinto and IUCN are exploring how towork together on improving conservation outcomes for Rio Tinto and the mining sector in general as well asbuilding the capacity of both organizations to implement market-based approaches to biodiversity conservation.Rio Tinto is one of the world’s leading mining and exploration companies. Collaboration with IUCN will help RioTinto move closer to its goal of achieving a ‘net positive impact’ – which means minimising its impacts on theenvironment and ensuring that biodiversity conservation ultimately benefits from Rio Tinto’s presence in a region.The collaboration with IUCN also aims to help both organizations address emerging issues such as themanagement of protected areas and ecosystem service provision.
 
i
The designation of geographical entities in this book, and the presentation of the material, donot imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of IUCN, IIED and UNDPconcerning the legal status of any country, territory, or area, or of its authorities, or concerningthe delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of IUCN or Rio Tinto.This publication has been made possible by funding from Rio TintoPublished by: IUCN, Gland, SwitzerlandCopyright:
©
2009 International Union for Conservation of Nature and NaturalResourcesReproduction of this publication for educational or other non-commercialpurposes is authorized without prior written permission from thecopyright holder provided the source is fully acknowledged.Reproduction of this publication for resale or other commercial purposesis prohibited without prior written permission of the copyright holder.Citation: Olsen, N. and J. Bishop (2009).
The Financial Costs of REDD: Evidence from Brazil and Indonesia 
. Gland, Switzerland: IUCN. 65pp.
 
ISBN: 978-2-8317-1206-2 Acknowledgements: Special thanks go to Stuart Anstee, Rio Tinto, and David Huberman,IUCN for their constructive and insightful comments at various stages.Cover design by: Nathalie OlsenCover photo: IUCN Photo Library © Johannes Förster Layout by: Nathalie Olsen Available from: IUCN (International Unionfor Conservation of Nature)Publications ServicesRue Mauverney 281196 GlandSwitzerlandTel +41 22 999 0000Fax +41 22 999 0020books@iucn.orgwww.iucn.org/publications A catalogue of IUCN publications is also available.Please send any comments to Nathalie.olsen@iucn.org

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