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Raqueeb Hassan: Africa Connects, Plethora of Submarine Cables!

Raqueeb Hassan: Africa Connects, Plethora of Submarine Cables!

Ratings: (0)|Views: 54|Likes:
Best weather on planet earth?

Having lived there for over a year, Bunia (DRC) stays on top of my list. I do have a soft spot for Africa, and best part, it has opened up its entire bureaucratic authoritarianism to connect the world. Well, I know there have been loads of improvements in parts like health care, education and food security, but then I have to cling on to the things when it comes to communication.

Don’t fall flat when you hear a total of seven (Cable Systems) undersea fibre optic cables, with an aggregate capacity of 10.94 terabytes (10,940 gigabytes), have landing stations along the entire coast line around Africa. As referred in last September in Allafrica.com , submarine fibre optic cables landing in Africa include SAT-3, 120 gigabytes, Main-one, another cable system - 1.92 terabytes, Glo-one, 640 gigabytes, East African Submarine Cable System (EASSY), 1.3 terabytes, South Asia Telecom Cable (SEACOM), 1.2 terabytes, The Eastern African Marine Systems (TEAMS), 640 gigabytes, and the largest of them all, West Africa Cable System (WACS), 5.12 terabytes. This WACS, according to another report, the capacity will rise to around 10 Tb/s by the end of 2011, or 120 times the 2008 capacity.

TEAMS, according to the said source, is being constructed at $82 million; EASSY, $235 million; Main One, $240 million, SEACOM, $600 million, whiles WACS, SAT-3 and GLO1 are equally multi-million dollar projects. It feels great when Africans are reaching out for endless possibilities, cutting the bureaucratic channels, common sense regulation, sometimes others tend to miss.

And, here on the West Coast of Africa, some other cable systems including SAT-3 (14,000km), WACS (14,000km) and Main one (14,000 km) connect Europe to South Africa, stretching from Portugal, with several landing stations along the western coast of Africa down to the south; Glo1 (9,500km) connects United Kingdom to Nigeria, landing in Spain, Portugal, Morocco, Mauritania, Senegal and Ghana. Can you believe that?

And then, to the East of Africa there is EASSY, which connects South Africa to Sudan, with several landing stations along the eastern coast; SEACOM (15,000km) connects France to India, with at least seven landing stations in Africa, from South Africa through the eastern coast to Egypt in the north.

According to TEAMS, which is 4,500km long cable system and links Kenya with the United Arab Emirates, with possible (some have come up already) landing stations in Rwanda, Southern Sudan, Ethiopia, Uganda, Tanzania and Burundi.

Let me go back to Stanford’s brilliant work on Internet end-to-end performance monitoring solution at IEPM. This group at Stanford monitors network connectivity and end-to-end performance for sites involved in Internet2, the U.S. D.o.E funded laboratories, laboratories throughout the world, and Institutes and Universities throughout the world involved in data intensive science. What else do you see there?

Guess what, just yesterday, Tunisie Telecom has brought digital independence (similar concept like Digital Bangladesh) to Tunisia by landing the country’s first 100% African-owned subsea cable in Europe connects North Africa to Interoute’s pan European next-generation network, via Interoute’s landing station in Sicily.

The cable system provides Tunisia with an additional route to the Sea-Me-We-4 and Keltra submarine cables, providing a redundant and reliable international network for its incumbent, (like BTCL here in Bangladesh) Tunisie Telecom. The cable’s total capacity of 3.2 Terabytes/s is more than seven times greater than that of SEA-ME-WE-4 cable that had been serving Tunisia previously. Bangladesh has a lone route to SEA-ME-WE-4.

Too much regulation sometimes kills things. My understanding, light handed approach has been a success case in emerging countries. As per regulation body of knowledge,

Light-handed regulation allows the firm discretion in how it meets regulatory targets. Regulation that is not intrusive, in co
Best weather on planet earth?

Having lived there for over a year, Bunia (DRC) stays on top of my list. I do have a soft spot for Africa, and best part, it has opened up its entire bureaucratic authoritarianism to connect the world. Well, I know there have been loads of improvements in parts like health care, education and food security, but then I have to cling on to the things when it comes to communication.

Don’t fall flat when you hear a total of seven (Cable Systems) undersea fibre optic cables, with an aggregate capacity of 10.94 terabytes (10,940 gigabytes), have landing stations along the entire coast line around Africa. As referred in last September in Allafrica.com , submarine fibre optic cables landing in Africa include SAT-3, 120 gigabytes, Main-one, another cable system - 1.92 terabytes, Glo-one, 640 gigabytes, East African Submarine Cable System (EASSY), 1.3 terabytes, South Asia Telecom Cable (SEACOM), 1.2 terabytes, The Eastern African Marine Systems (TEAMS), 640 gigabytes, and the largest of them all, West Africa Cable System (WACS), 5.12 terabytes. This WACS, according to another report, the capacity will rise to around 10 Tb/s by the end of 2011, or 120 times the 2008 capacity.

TEAMS, according to the said source, is being constructed at $82 million; EASSY, $235 million; Main One, $240 million, SEACOM, $600 million, whiles WACS, SAT-3 and GLO1 are equally multi-million dollar projects. It feels great when Africans are reaching out for endless possibilities, cutting the bureaucratic channels, common sense regulation, sometimes others tend to miss.

And, here on the West Coast of Africa, some other cable systems including SAT-3 (14,000km), WACS (14,000km) and Main one (14,000 km) connect Europe to South Africa, stretching from Portugal, with several landing stations along the western coast of Africa down to the south; Glo1 (9,500km) connects United Kingdom to Nigeria, landing in Spain, Portugal, Morocco, Mauritania, Senegal and Ghana. Can you believe that?

And then, to the East of Africa there is EASSY, which connects South Africa to Sudan, with several landing stations along the eastern coast; SEACOM (15,000km) connects France to India, with at least seven landing stations in Africa, from South Africa through the eastern coast to Egypt in the north.

According to TEAMS, which is 4,500km long cable system and links Kenya with the United Arab Emirates, with possible (some have come up already) landing stations in Rwanda, Southern Sudan, Ethiopia, Uganda, Tanzania and Burundi.

Let me go back to Stanford’s brilliant work on Internet end-to-end performance monitoring solution at IEPM. This group at Stanford monitors network connectivity and end-to-end performance for sites involved in Internet2, the U.S. D.o.E funded laboratories, laboratories throughout the world, and Institutes and Universities throughout the world involved in data intensive science. What else do you see there?

Guess what, just yesterday, Tunisie Telecom has brought digital independence (similar concept like Digital Bangladesh) to Tunisia by landing the country’s first 100% African-owned subsea cable in Europe connects North Africa to Interoute’s pan European next-generation network, via Interoute’s landing station in Sicily.

The cable system provides Tunisia with an additional route to the Sea-Me-We-4 and Keltra submarine cables, providing a redundant and reliable international network for its incumbent, (like BTCL here in Bangladesh) Tunisie Telecom. The cable’s total capacity of 3.2 Terabytes/s is more than seven times greater than that of SEA-ME-WE-4 cable that had been serving Tunisia previously. Bangladesh has a lone route to SEA-ME-WE-4.

Too much regulation sometimes kills things. My understanding, light handed approach has been a success case in emerging countries. As per regulation body of knowledge,

Light-handed regulation allows the firm discretion in how it meets regulatory targets. Regulation that is not intrusive, in co

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Published by: Raqueeb Hassan, Lt Col Md Rakibul Hassan on Dec 16, 2009
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Submarine CablesDecember 16, 2009
Page 1
 
Africa Connects, Plethora of Submarine Cables!
Wednesday, December 16, 2009 by Raqueeb Hassan 
B
est weather on planet earth?Having lived there for over a year,Bunia (DRC)stays on top of my list. I do have a soft spot for Africa, and best part, it has opened up its entire bureaucratic authoritarianism to connectthe world. Well, I know there have been loads of improvements in parts like health care,education and food security, but then I have to cling on to the things when it comes tocommunication.
Don’t fall flat when you hear a total of seven (Cable Systems) undersea fibre optic ca
bles,with an aggregate capacity of 10.94 terabytes (10,940 gigabytes), have landing stations alongthe entire coast line around Africa. As referred in last September in Allafrica.com , submarine fibre optic cables landing in Africa include SAT-3, 120 gigabytes, Main-one, another cablesystem
1.92 terabytes, Glo-one, 640 gigabytes, East African Submarine Cable System(EASSY), 1.3 terabytes, South Asia Telecom Cable (SEACOM), 1.2 terabytes, The EasternAfrican Marine Systems (TEAMS), 640 gigabytes, and the largest of them all, West Africa CableSystem(WACS), 5.12 terabytes. This WACS, according to another report, the capacity will rise to around 10 Tb/s by the end of 2011, or 120 times the 2008 capacity.TEAMS, according to the said source, is being constructed at $82 million; EASSY, $235 million;Main One, $240 million, SEACOM, $600 million, whiles WACS, SAT-3 and GLO1 are equallymulti-million dollar projects. It feels great when Africans are reaching out for endlesspossibilities, cutting the bureaucratic channels, common sense regulation, sometimes otherstend to miss.And, here on the West Coast of Africa, some other cable systems including SAT-3 (14,000km),WACS (14,000km) and Main one (14,000 km) connect Europe to South Africa, stretching fromPortugal, with several landing stations along the western coast of Africa down to the south;Glo1 (9,500km) connects United Kingdom to Nigeria, landing in Spain, Portugal, Morocco,Mauritania, Senegal and Ghana. Can you believe that?And then, to the East of Africa there is EASSY, which connects South Africa to Sudan, withseveral landing stations along the eastern coast; SEACOM (15,000km) connects France toIndia, with at least seven landing stations in Africa, from South Africa through the easterncoast to Egypt in the north.According to TEAMS, which is 4,500km long cable system and links Kenya with the United ArabEmirates, with possible (some have come up already) landing stations in Rwanda, SouthernSudan, Ethiopia, Uganda, Tanzania and Burundi.
 
Submarine CablesDecember 16, 2009
Page 2
 
How about a pictorial? At least, you might say, seeing is believing!
It is for real! Africa is connecting! What is it happening there? Click for more.
Let me go back to Stanford’s brilliant work on Internet end
-to-end performance monitoringsolution atIEPM.This group at Stanford monitors network connectivity and end-to-end performance for sites involved in Internet2, the U.S. D.o.E funded laboratories, laboratoriesthroughout the world, and Institutes and Universities throughout the world involved in dataintensive science. What else do you see there? 

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