Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword or section
Like this
35Activity

Table Of Contents

0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
150 Chess Endings Part. 1

150 Chess Endings Part. 1

Ratings:

4.0

(1)
|Views: 5,941|Likes:
Published by elvuelodelcondor
Fifty-two endgame experts were selected from the over-the-board players. Their 150 best over-the-board, theoretical and composed endings got new annotations.
Great innovators are Philidor, Lasker, Botvinnik and Kramnik. Philidor played the first recorded endgame of acceptable quality. Lasker used endgame technique as a weapon. He approached perfection in some games. Botvinnik scored wins and saved games by superior analyses of adjourned games. Kramnik applies all aspects of struggle and prophylaxis with great talent.

Other experts from the list of fifty are Tarrasch, Rubinstein, Capablanca, Euwe, Reshevsky, Keres, Smyslov, Petrosian, Korchnoi, Fischer, Karpov and Kasparov.
The endings are a small selection from a series of thirty books on chess players as endgame artists.

The games diverts from the usual order in two ways:
A. Players are rank ordered by year of birth.
B. The round number has been used for the follow-up of the endings by the expert.
Fifty-two endgame experts were selected from the over-the-board players. Their 150 best over-the-board, theoretical and composed endings got new annotations.
Great innovators are Philidor, Lasker, Botvinnik and Kramnik. Philidor played the first recorded endgame of acceptable quality. Lasker used endgame technique as a weapon. He approached perfection in some games. Botvinnik scored wins and saved games by superior analyses of adjourned games. Kramnik applies all aspects of struggle and prophylaxis with great talent.

Other experts from the list of fifty are Tarrasch, Rubinstein, Capablanca, Euwe, Reshevsky, Keres, Smyslov, Petrosian, Korchnoi, Fischer, Karpov and Kasparov.
The endings are a small selection from a series of thirty books on chess players as endgame artists.

The games diverts from the usual order in two ways:
A. Players are rank ordered by year of birth.
B. The round number has been used for the follow-up of the endings by the expert.

More info:

Published by: elvuelodelcondor on Dec 19, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/31/2013

pdf

text

original

 
 1
150 chess endingsBy Jan van Reek 
Fifty-two endgame experts were selected from the over-the-board players. Their 150 best over-the-board, theoretical and composed endings got new annotations.Great innovators are Philidor, Lasker, Botvinnik and Kramnik. Philidor played thefirst recorded endgame of acceptable quality. Lasker used endgame technique as a weapon. He approached perfection in some games. Botvinnik scored wins andsaved games by superior analyses of adjourned games. Kramnik applies all aspectsof struggle and prophylaxis with great talent.Other experts from the list of fifty are Tarrasch, Rubinstein, Capablanca, Euwe,Reshevsky, Keres, Smyslov, Petrosian, Korchnoi, Fischer, Karpov and Kasparov.The endings are a small selection from a series of thirty books on chess players asendgame artists.The games diverts from the usual order in two ways: A. Players are rank ordered by year of birth.B. The round number has been used for the follow-up of the endings by theexpert.
(1) Bruehl,Count John - Philidor,Francois [C23]
Philidor London 1783 (1), 1726
[JvR] 
Modern positional play begins with the musician Philidor (1726–1795). He likes tosupport pawns by pieces from behind. His eyes are blindfolded in this game.
1.e4
Philidor has the better pawn structure in the endgame. He can attack on bothflanks.
1...e5 2.¥c4 c6 3.£e2 d6 4.c3 f5 5.d3 ¤f6 6.exf5 ¥xf5 7.d4 e4 8.¥g5d5 9.¥b3 ¥d6 10.¤d2 ¤bd7 11.h3 h6 12.¥e3 £e7 13.f4 h5 14.c4 a615.cxd5 cxd5 16.£f2 0–0 17.¤e2 b5 18.0–0 ¤b6 19.¤g3 g6 20.¦ac1 ¤c421.¤xf5 gxf5 22.£g3+ £g7 23.£xg7+ ¢xg7 24.¥xc4 bxc4 25.g3 ¦ab826.b3
 
 2
Philidor has the better pawn structure in the endgame. He can attack on bothflanks.
26...¥a3 27.¦c2 cxb3 28.axb3?
[A weakness is avoided by 28.¤xb3 ]
28...¦fc8 29.¦xc8 ¦xc8 30.¦a1 ¥b4 31.¦xa6 ¦c3 32.¢f2 ¦d3 33.¦a2¥xd2 34.¦xd2 ¦xb3
Black pressures on the queenside.
35.¦c2 h4!
The attackswitches to the kingside.
36.¦c7+ ¢g6 37.gxh4 ¤h5 38.¦d7
[38.¦c6+ ¢f739.¦c7+ ¢e6 40.¦c6+!; 38.¢e2 ¤g3+ 39.¢f2 ¤f1 leads to the game. 40.¢xf1 ¦xe341.¦d7 ¦f3+ 42.¢g2]
38...¤xf4!
Philidor sees a combination despite of theblindfold. [When Black plays 38...¤f6 or; 38...¦b5 he will make no progress.]
39.¥xf4 ¦f3+ 40.¢g2 ¦xf4 41.¦xd5 ¦f3
Philidor has his favorite connectedpassed pawns.
42.¦d8 ¦d3 43.d5 f4 44.d6 ¦d2+ 45.¢f1 ¢f7 46.h5 e3 47.h6??
[47.¦d7+! ¢e6 48.¦d8! leads to an escape.]
47...f3
This is the first acceptablepractical endgame that I could find.
0–1
 
(2) Philidor,Francois
Philidor L'analyse des echecs 1749 (2), 1726
[JvR] 
Endgame theory started with Polerio, Greco and Stamma. Philidor also made valuable contributions. He formulated the basics for the endgame of rook andbishop versus rook.
1.¦f8+ ¦e8 2.¦f7 ¦e2!
[2...¦h8 3.¦a7 ¦h6+ 4.¥e6 leads tomate.]
3.¦g7!
The black rook is forced to a less favorable square.
3...¦e1
[Weak is3...¦e3 4.¦b7]
4.¦b7 ¦c1
[Another interesting variation is 4...¢c8 5.¦a7! ¦b16.¦h7! ¢b8
(6...¦b6+ 7.¥c6) 
7.¦h8+ ¢a7 8.¦a8+ ¢b6 9.¦b8+]
5.¥b3!!
This move would make no sense if the black rook should be on c2.
5...¦c3!
The rook movesto a bad rank. [White also wins in 5...¢c8 6.¦b4 ¢d8 7.¦f4 ¦e1
(7...¢c8 8.¥d5 ¢b8 9.¦a4) 
8.¥a4 ¢c8 9.¥c6 ¦d1+ 10.¥d5 ¢b8 11.¦a4]
6.¥e6 ¦d3+ 7.¥d5 ¦c3
[7...¢c8 8.¦a7 loses at once.]
8.¦d7+! ¢c8
[Or 8...¢e8 9.¦g7]
9.¦f7 ¢b810.¦b7+ ¢c8 11.¦b4! ¢d8
[The first point of the last white move is 11...¦d312.¦a4]
12.¥c4!!
The second point:
12...¢c8 13.¥e6+ ¢d8 14.¦b8+ ¦c815.¦xc8# 1–0
 
 
 3
(3) De la Bourdonnais,Louis
Bourdonnais La Palamede 1837, 1797
[JvR] 
De la Bourdonnais (1797–1840) played a series of six matches with MacDonnell inLondon 1834. It was the first long international chess event. The tactical talent of theFrenchman prevailed. He composed a simple endgame study.
1.c8¤+!
Calvi andDe la Bourdonnais supported the idea of minor promotion as a law of chess.[1.£h7+? ¢f6! leads to a repetition of moves.]
1...¢e8
[1...¢d8 2.£xd3+ ¢xc83.¢xe2 f1£+ 4.¢xf1 ¢c7 5.£g6]
2.£g6+ ¢f8 3.£f6+ ¢g8 4.¤e7+ ¢h7 5.£g6+¢h8 6.£g8# 1–0
 
(4) Kling & Horwitz
Horwitz Chess Studies 1851, 1807
[JvR] 
Bernhard Horwitz (1807–1885) moved from Germany to London in 1846. Stauntondefeated him in a match. He cooperated with the chess composer Josef Kling.

Activity (35)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
rishaanjeffri liked this
Nenad Popovic liked this
buenaventura_f_a liked this
danelo liked this
Nilton Rosao liked this
arpielerma liked this
tato_robi liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->