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Step-By-Step Install Guide Windows 7 v1.3

Step-By-Step Install Guide Windows 7 v1.3

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Published by Kefa Rabah
Windows 7 is stable, smooth, and highly polished, introducing new graphical features, a new taskbar that can compete handily with the Mac OS X dock, and device management and security enhancements that make it both easier to use and safer. Importantly, it won't require the hardware upgrades that Vista demanded, partially because the hardware has caught up, and partially because Microsoft has gone to great lengths to make Windows 7 accessible to as many people as possible.

It's important to note that the public testing process for Windows 7 involved one limited-availability beta and one release candidate, and constituted what some have called the largest shareware trial period ever. As buggy and irritating as Vista was, Windows 7 isn't. Windows 7 is a beast of an operating system. It can run on old hardware wonderfully well, unlike its predecessor Windows Vista which required major hardware upgrades for several organizations which were till then using relatively old hardware to give them optimum performance. In this respect, you can look at Windows 7, as the successor to Windows XP that Microsoft wishes Vista had been, and finally places it on competitive footing with other major operating systems like Mac OS X and Linux.

Microsoft is offering six versions of Windows 7: Starter, Home Premium, Professional, Ultimate, OEM, and Enterprise. The three versions that Redmond will be promoting most heavily are Home Premium, Professional, and Ultimate, although Starter will also be available to consumers.

Windows 7 will support both 32-bit and 64-bit systems. The bare minimum requirements for the 32-bit include a 1GHz processor, 1GB RAM, 16GB available hard-disk space, and a DirectX 9 graphics device with WDDM 1.0 or higher driver. 64-bit systems will require at least a 1 GHz processor, 2GB RAM, 20GB of free space on your hard drive, and a DirectX 9 graphics device with WDDM 1.0 or higher driver. A touch-screen monitor is required to take advantage of the native touch features. Do note that some users have claimed to have limited success running the Windows 7 beta with less than 1GB of RAM, but that's not recommended.

Windows 7 deployment is currently the biggest concern for many IT professionals worldwide, and as is with every new OS, especially MS Windows solutions, it doesn’t get much easier, due to the fact that most enterprises from small to large, use Windows OS, mostly Win XP/Vista and now Win 7. In this respect, there are many tools out there you can use to deploy Win 7. Some of the Windows 7 deployment and client management products are e.g., from Linux-based open source Fog, to proprietary tools like Acronis, Avocent, Kace and Microsoft Deployment Tool to choose from.

In this Hands-on Systems Integration Training Labs, we’re going to undertake a step-by-step installation, and configuration of Win 7. This project was demonstrated entirely using VMware (you may also use any other virtual machines like MS VirtualPC, Linux Xen, or VirtualBox from Sun); however, once you have perfected the setup and configuration steps, you can migrate to physical servers to take advantage of the power of Win 7. Next, you’ll learn how to join Win 7 as domain member to Win 2k3 Active Directory DC, which has also Exchange Server 2003 installed on it. You’ll also learn how to access your email messages from Win 7 machine using web browser via OWA. Finally, you’ll have the opportunity to do some Hands-on Labs Assignment at the end of this lab session. You’ll be asked to install Windows Server 2008, which you then promote to Active Directory DC and then join Win 7 to it as a domain member. You’ll also be asked to install Exchange Server 2007 on the domain server and then use OWA to access your emails from Win 7 machine.
Windows 7 is stable, smooth, and highly polished, introducing new graphical features, a new taskbar that can compete handily with the Mac OS X dock, and device management and security enhancements that make it both easier to use and safer. Importantly, it won't require the hardware upgrades that Vista demanded, partially because the hardware has caught up, and partially because Microsoft has gone to great lengths to make Windows 7 accessible to as many people as possible.

It's important to note that the public testing process for Windows 7 involved one limited-availability beta and one release candidate, and constituted what some have called the largest shareware trial period ever. As buggy and irritating as Vista was, Windows 7 isn't. Windows 7 is a beast of an operating system. It can run on old hardware wonderfully well, unlike its predecessor Windows Vista which required major hardware upgrades for several organizations which were till then using relatively old hardware to give them optimum performance. In this respect, you can look at Windows 7, as the successor to Windows XP that Microsoft wishes Vista had been, and finally places it on competitive footing with other major operating systems like Mac OS X and Linux.

Microsoft is offering six versions of Windows 7: Starter, Home Premium, Professional, Ultimate, OEM, and Enterprise. The three versions that Redmond will be promoting most heavily are Home Premium, Professional, and Ultimate, although Starter will also be available to consumers.

Windows 7 will support both 32-bit and 64-bit systems. The bare minimum requirements for the 32-bit include a 1GHz processor, 1GB RAM, 16GB available hard-disk space, and a DirectX 9 graphics device with WDDM 1.0 or higher driver. 64-bit systems will require at least a 1 GHz processor, 2GB RAM, 20GB of free space on your hard drive, and a DirectX 9 graphics device with WDDM 1.0 or higher driver. A touch-screen monitor is required to take advantage of the native touch features. Do note that some users have claimed to have limited success running the Windows 7 beta with less than 1GB of RAM, but that's not recommended.

Windows 7 deployment is currently the biggest concern for many IT professionals worldwide, and as is with every new OS, especially MS Windows solutions, it doesn’t get much easier, due to the fact that most enterprises from small to large, use Windows OS, mostly Win XP/Vista and now Win 7. In this respect, there are many tools out there you can use to deploy Win 7. Some of the Windows 7 deployment and client management products are e.g., from Linux-based open source Fog, to proprietary tools like Acronis, Avocent, Kace and Microsoft Deployment Tool to choose from.

In this Hands-on Systems Integration Training Labs, we’re going to undertake a step-by-step installation, and configuration of Win 7. This project was demonstrated entirely using VMware (you may also use any other virtual machines like MS VirtualPC, Linux Xen, or VirtualBox from Sun); however, once you have perfected the setup and configuration steps, you can migrate to physical servers to take advantage of the power of Win 7. Next, you’ll learn how to join Win 7 as domain member to Win 2k3 Active Directory DC, which has also Exchange Server 2003 installed on it. You’ll also learn how to access your email messages from Win 7 machine using web browser via OWA. Finally, you’ll have the opportunity to do some Hands-on Labs Assignment at the end of this lab session. You’ll be asked to install Windows Server 2008, which you then promote to Active Directory DC and then join Win 7 to it as a domain member. You’ll also be asked to install Exchange Server 2007 on the domain server and then use OWA to access your emails from Win 7 machine.

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Published by: Kefa Rabah on Dec 20, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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Global Open Versity ICT Labs Step-by-Step Install Guide Windows 7 v1.3
© September 2008, Kefa Rabah, Global Open Versity, Vancouver Canada
www.globalopenversity.com
 
A GOV Open Knowledge Access License Technical Publication
2
Global Open VersitySystems Integration Hands-on Labs Training Manual
Step-by-Step Install Guide Windows 7
Kefa RabahGlobal Open Versity, Vancouver Canada
krabah@globalopenversity.org
 
www.globalopenversity.org
 
Table of Contents Page No.STEP-BY-STEP INSTALL GUIDE WINDOWS 7 3
 
Introduction
3
 
Part 1: Install & Configure Windows 7
4
 
Step 1: Install Windows 7
4
 
Part 2: Join Windows 7 to Windows 2003 Active Directory DC
17
 
Step 1: Install & Configure Windows 2003 Active Directory Domain Controller 
17
 
Step 2: Access your e-mail from messaging server on domain server03
23
 
Part 3: Deploy Windows 7 on LAN Infrastructure
24
 
Step 1: Microsoft Deployment Toolkit
25
 
Step 2: Deploy Win 7 using Open Source Linux Fog
25
 
Part 4: Hands-on Labs Assignment
25
 
© A GOV Open Knowledge Access Technical Academic Publications License
Enhancing education & empowering people worldwide through eLearning in the 21st Century
 
 
Global Open Versity ICT Labs Step-by-Step Install Guide Windows 7 v1.3
© September 2008, Kefa Rabah, Global Open Versity, Vancouver Canada
www.globalopenversity.com
 
A GOV Open Knowledge Access License Technical Publication
3
Global Open VersitySystems Integration Hands-on Labs Training ManualStep-by-Step Install Guide Windows 7
By Kefa Rabah,krabah@globalopenversity.orgDec 18, 2009GTS Institute 
Introduction
Windows 7 is stable, smooth, and highly polished, introducing new graphical features, a new taskbar thatcan compete handily with the Mac OS X dock, and device management and security enhancements thatmake it both easier to use and safer. Importantly, it won't require the hardware upgrades that Vistademanded, partially because the hardware has caught up, and partially because Microsoft has gone togreat lengths to make Windows 7 accessible to as many people as possible.It's important to note that the public testing process for Windows 7 involved one limited-availability betaand one release candidate, and constituted what some have called the largest shareware trial period ever.As buggy and irritating as Vista was, Windows 7 isn't. Instead, it's the successor to Windows XP thatMicrosoft wishes Vista had been, and finally places it on competitive footing with other major operatingsystems like Mac OS X and Linux.Windows 7 is a beast of an operating system. It can run on old hardware wonderfully well, unlike itspredecessor Windows Vista which required major hardware upgrades for several organizations whichwere till then using relatively old hardware to give them optimum performance. Microsoft is offering sixversions of Windows 7: Starter, Home Premium, Professional, Ultimate, OEM, and Enterprise. The threeversions that Redmond will be promoting most heavily are Home Premium, Professional, and Ultimate,although Starter will also be available to consumers.Windows 7 will support both 32-bit and 64-bit systems. The bare minimum requirements for the 32-bitinclude a 1GHz processor, 1GB RAM, 16GB available hard-disk space, and a DirectX 9 graphics devicewith WDDM 1.0 or higher driver. 64-bit systems will require at least a 1 GHz processor, 2GB RAM, 20GBof free space on your hard drive, and a DirectX 9 graphics device with WDDM 1.0 or higher driver. Atouch-screen monitor is required to take advantage of the native touch features. Do note that some usershave claimed to have limited success running the Windows 7 beta with less than 1GB of RAM, but that'snot recommended.Windows 7 deployment is currently the biggest concern for many IT professionals worldwide, and as iswith every new OS, especially MS Windows solutions, it doesn’t get much easier, due to the fact that mostenterprises from small to large, use Windows OS, mostly Win XP/Vista and now Win 7. In this respect,there are many tools out there you can use to deploy Win 7. Some of the Windows 7 deployment andclient management products are e.g., from Linux-based open sourceFog, to proprietary tools likeAcronis, Avocent,KaceandMicrosoft Deployment Toolto choose from. In this Hands-on Systems Integration Training Labs, we’re going to undertake a step-by-step installation,and configuration of Win 7. This project was demonstrated entirely using VMware (you may also use any

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