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Interview With Chuck Wilson, Deputy General Manager, Hitachi Security Solutions Group, Hitachi America, Ltd.

Interview With Chuck Wilson, Deputy General Manager, Hitachi Security Solutions Group, Hitachi America, Ltd.

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Published by findbiometrics
It assists organizations in integrating new technologies such as smart cards, radio frequency identification (RFID) and vein pattern biometrics into their business processes as customized solutions. In North America, Hitachi supports three key finger vein products: The VeinGuard physical access and the H1 logical access reader. Hitachi continues to improve and refine its vein pattern technology.
It assists organizations in integrating new technologies such as smart cards, radio frequency identification (RFID) and vein pattern biometrics into their business processes as customized solutions. In North America, Hitachi supports three key finger vein products: The VeinGuard physical access and the H1 logical access reader. Hitachi continues to improve and refine its vein pattern technology.

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Published by: findbiometrics on Dec 22, 2009
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12/21/2009

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Interview with Chuck Wilson, DeputyGeneral Manager, Hitachi Security SolutionsGroup, Hitachi America, Ltd.
Aug-15-08
FB
 Can you please provide our readers with a brief background ofthe company?
Hitachi
 Hitachi America, Ltd. (HAL) markets and manufactures a broadrange of electronics, computer systems and products,semiconductors, consumer electronics, and provides industrialequipment and services throughout North America. HAL is awholly-owned subsidiary of Hitachi, Ltd., an $85 billion dollarcompany with more than three hundred forty thousandemployees around the world.Established in 1959, Hitachi has been a presence in the U.S. foralmost five decades. Today, HAL has four thousand four hundredemployees in nine divisions and twelve subsidiaries across theAmericas. The Hitachi Security Solutions Group (HSS) is part ofHitachi America, Ltd.
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Information Division. It serves as a separateinitiative within Hitachi America Ltd., to provide a broad portfolio ofsecurity technology solutions in selected market sectors.It assists organizations in integrating new technologies such as smart cards, radio frequencyidentification (RFID) and vein pattern biometrics into their business processes as customizedsolutions. As a systems integrator HSS provides project management / quality assurance,system design, software development, consulting and professional support services.
FB
 Can you review your biometric product line?
Hitachi
 In North America, Hitachi supports three key finger vein products:
(1) the VeinGuard physical access terminal shown to the reader’s
right, (2) the H1 logical access reader shown on the left, and (3) an embedded module, shown below, for support of ATMs, kiosks,turnstiles and other devices requiring an embedded biometricsolution.
 
FB
 What would you say are the key advantages of vein pattern recognition overother biometric techniques?
Hitachi
 Vein pattern recognition offers an array of advantages over other biometricmodalities, especially in the area of people considerations, including the following:
Ease of feature extraction
 
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Veins provide large, robust, relatively stable and hidden(to the naked eye) biometric features.
Spoof resistance
 
 –
Vein patterns are not easily observed, damaged, obscured orchanged. They do not exhibit latency properties, and they are quite difficult to replicate.This makes them highly resistant to spoofing.
High accuracy
 
 –
Vein patterns have very low false acceptance levels (< .0001%) andlow false reject levels (< .01%). Further, less than 0.1% of most populations areincapable of enrolling. Vein pattern biometrics can differentiate between identical twins;that claim is shared only by iris and retina recognition and fingerprint modalities.
Environmental freedom
 
 –
Vein patterns are much less susceptible to many externalfactors in the way that fingerprinting, facial recognition, or iris scanning can be.
User friendliness
 
 –
Vein pattern technology can be privacy enhancing; it is fast (< 2
seconds), user intuitive regarding the placement of one’s finger or hand, hygienic, and is
generally bereft of cultural bias and criminal stigmas.
Small footprint
 
 –
VPR sensors are quite compact and are now approaching the size ofthe smallest fingerprint readers, and they are continuing to rapidly downsize, increasingportability for use with mobile devices.
FB
 Hitachi dominates the Japanese market with its finger vein products. How are thesedeployments going?
Hitachi
 The deployments throughout Japan have gone very well. As of April 2007, 75% of Japanese
bank branches have successfully implemented Hitachi’s fin
ger vein technology, representingover 26,548 ATMs nationwide. In addition, Hitachi has deployed over 60,000 logical accessfinger vein systems and over 20,000 physical access systems in Japan. The Hitachi finger veintechnology is now taking root globally.
FB
 What are the key applications that vein pattern technology can address?
Hitachi
 Most people associate biometrics with security applications such as physical and logical access.Indeed, physical access to buildings, laboratories, data centers, and other secure facilities is a
 
highly visible, traditional application for biometric technology, and it remains so for Hitachi’s
finger vein systems. Moreover, logical access to commercial and corporate networks, personalcomputers, financial accounts (e.g., ATMs) and other virtual systems is a strong and rapidlygrowing application. Hitachi continues to exhibit success in this promising sector. However,there are a growing number of other applications including workforce management, such astime and attendance
 –
a significant headache for many businesses, and one which biometricscan solve with efficiency and convenience. Another key application is membership, whereby amember of a given organization needs to verify his identity to access the benefits ofmembership. Finger vein technology can determine if an individual is already part of a database,
such as someone seeking a social service benefit, driver’s license, or national ID. Finally, finger 
vein pattern recognition can be extremely useful in accountability applications whereby oneneeds to authenticate an identity, such things as boarding a commercial aircraft, ship, bus ortrain; maintaining a chain of evidence; or signing for a classified document. While these broadcategories are by no means the only appropriate applications for vein pattern recognitiontechnology, they are the primary ones in use today.
FB
 What are some of the challenges you face with vein pattern technology?
Hitachi
 Like all biometric technologies, vein pattern recognition has its challenges. The most prominentchallenge is that relatively few people are aware of the technology and its capabilities. Fingervein technology is often confused with the fingerprint modality. Although they both focus on thesame body part, the two technologies could not be more different. Finger vein patterntechnology is closed view, spoofing resistant, hygienic, and privacy-enhancing.
FB
 In terms of new product development, what can we expect to see from Hitachi in the nearfuture?
Hitachi
 
Hitachi’s first comm
ercial systems were deployed in 2004. In 2005, a grip-type finger veinauthentication technology was developed, enabling a door to be opened simply by gripping thehandle. In 2006, Hitachi announced its logical access product; and in 2008, the VeinGuardphysical access product was launched in North America. Since then, Hitachi has been workingto develop an even more compact system to extend market applications.Another implementation was demonstrated at the 2007 Tokyo Motor Show, where the driverpresents
his finger to the reader embedded on a steering wheel to start the car’s engine.
 

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