Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
4Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Technometria: Spimes

Technometria: Spimes

Ratings:

4.5

(1)
|Views: 124|Likes:
Published by OpenSpime
Bruce Sterling suggests the creation of a new type of technological device called a "spime" that through pervasive RFID communications and GPS navigation can track its history and interact with the world.
On Technometria from IT Conversations, Phil Windley along with Scott Lemon talked with David Orban and Roberto Ostinelli about OpenSpime, an open source project for supporting spime technology.

Transcript of a Technometria podcast episode, of March 18, 2008
Bruce Sterling suggests the creation of a new type of technological device called a "spime" that through pervasive RFID communications and GPS navigation can track its history and interact with the world.
On Technometria from IT Conversations, Phil Windley along with Scott Lemon talked with David Orban and Roberto Ostinelli about OpenSpime, an open source project for supporting spime technology.

Transcript of a Technometria podcast episode, of March 18, 2008

More info:

Published by: OpenSpime on Apr 04, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

09/27/2012

pdf

text

original

 
Technometria: Spimes
The following is a transcript of a Technometria podcast episode , of March 18, 2008 
Bruce Sterling suggests the creation of a new type of technological device called a "spime"that through pervasive RFID communications and GPS navigation can track its history andinteract with the world.OnTechnometriafrom IT Conversations, Phil Windley along with Scott Lemon talked withDavid Orban and Roberto Ostinelli aboutOpenSpime, an open source project forsupporting spime technology.
Phil:
Hi! This is Phil Windley, the executive producer of IT Conversations. Today I am happy to bring youanother edition of my personal podcast "Technometria".
Phil:
Hi David! Hi Rob. How are you guys today?
David:
Hi Phil, I'm fine. This is David Orban here.
Rob:
And hi Phil, this is Rob Ostinelli.
Phil:
Yeah, and you'reboth speaking to me from Italyright?
David:
Yes, that's right - we have just been over in theU.S. and now came back and are very happy to beinvited to be with you on the show.
Phil:
Well that's good. It's great to talk to you, I'm gladwe could get this worked out. And Scott, glad to haveyou back after your vacation in Hawaii.
Scott:
Yeah it's nice to be back.
Phil:
Now Scott, before we start talking to David andRob about why we asked them to be on the show, I didactually want to question you a little bit because lastweek you weren't just on vacation in Hawaii. You weregetting married, and I follow you on Twitter and as far as I know it has to be the first Twittered Wedding!
Scott:
It was actually kind of fun you know, since playing around with Twitter - you know, at the time myfiance is on Twitter also and we've both been having funwith it just doing things. Today as I took off on vacationI realized that a lot of different friends who arefollowing it was a destination wedding in Hawaii, so alot of peoplecouldn't come over so I kind of just took the time to sit there and Twitter on and off. And then of course you get all the people in advance who startsaying, "Are you actually going to Twitter through theceremony?". I thought, "Well obviously I don't think I'mgoing to stand up there with the Minister and Twitter while it's going on"...
Phil:
I just said
"I Do
!"
Yeah! But it was kind of fun, because it did giveAndrea the chance that you know, she would see myTwitters. I would see hers of where we were, what wewere doing - you know, preparing for it and stuff; andwe actually got married at one of the Hotels there, inWaikoloa; and so it was kind of interesting sitting there,waiting until the last minutes. You know, you got to dosomething with your time and sitting out at a little
Technometria: Spimes
www.openspime.com 
1
www.technometria.com
 
gazebo by the ocean I thought, "Well I can always throwout a couple last Twitters of observation".
Phil:
I thought it was fun because you know, I've saidover and over again that I think one of the funnestthings about Twitter is that it gives you that sense of what people you know are doing in a way that's notaboutwork, right. It's that I knew more about your wedding and what you were doing - and I enjoyed it.
Scott:
You know it's interesting because I think it does blend into even this conversation with David and Rob because I agree with you. I think there's this realinteresting aspect, even though it's not over the Internetof sort of this remote awareness that you're gaining of what's going on elsewhere in the world, elsewhere withother people, without a lot of effort. You're just carryingyour cell phone and you keep getting these updates.Actually I was kind of jealous as I saw you were ridingyour bike the other day and I thought the same thing,"It's always cool to see when Phil goes out on his bikeand I gotta connect up with you one day, doing that."
Phil:
Yeah.
Scott:
But it was neat because I had a lot of friends whoTwittered back after the ceremony. We Twittered at thedinner a couple times as we were sitting there andeveryone's talking. It was interesting too, thetechnological dinner after the ceremony because eventhough there weren't a lot of geeks there was family.Everybody is passing around Digital Camera's showingoff, "Oh I took these photos, Did you see this one? Thesun has set and it was really neat and..." It was kind of funny because here it is we were Twittering and peoplewere Twittering back saying, "Dude you just gotmarried. What are you doing?". I was like, "Well I'msitting at a table full of people who are all passingaround digital cameras and cell phones and things of what's going on. It's a real interesting awareness, alinking of community.
Phil:
Let's get to David and Rob - don't want to ignorethem for the whole while although we probably couldtalk about Twittering weddings for a while. So David Iran in to you last week atETechin San Diego.You gave a talk at the Ignite Session right?
David:
Yeah that's right. I was very happy to be ableand speak right after Tim O'Reilly's keynote because Iknew the room would be full. It was just like that, and itwas an exciting session.
Phil:
So your website, we'll have this linked on the pagefor this podcast but your website iswww.openspime.comand that's "S-P-I-M-E". For  people that aren't familiar with that whole concept whydon't you, either Rob or David, either one of you - whydon't you just tell us what a "spime" is and where thatcame from. Just give us some background.
David:
Yes, of course. The spime neologism has beencoined byBruce Sterlingthe science fiction author andWired columnist two or three years ago. It represents anew category of objects that are aware of their surroundings. They know where they are and when theyare through GPS positioning and they have a memoryunit and communication. The memory for storing valueswhen they are not in the cloud, and communicationwhen they enter the cloud and then can transmitwhatever they are sensing, which is this last importantelement of what makes a spime. They have a sensor thatcan recordwhat is thenspace-time stamped andtransmitted somewhere andsomeplace. So this is whatBruce envisioned and we are very honored to havereceived his blessing for our technology. To take on thename that he invented and sent out in the wild, to putout roots and flourish, because we want to implementhis vision of smart objects getting widely available in the world.
Phil:
So if I were to take your description into account.I think that maybe the closest thing I've seen at this point to something like that would be like aSunSpot.Are you familiar with SunSpots and is that a reasonableapproximation to this?
David:
Yes, I mean Bruce actually says—he wrote a book called "Shaping Things"...
Phil:
Yeah, which I've read actually.
David:
Uh huh, it is a very nice book about design andthe environment and about how technology willtransform our perception of the environment and our impact on it. He basically says that from enoughdistance everything is a spime, which is basically true!But your example is very correct, as Sun Microsystemsin their Sun Labs have avery nice hardware unit that people canpurchase and play with to program with allkinds of behaviors; hook up to the web and play aroundwith. Yes, we had the chance to talk at ETechextensively with the people from Sun. They certainlyhave a vision that is very close to ours.
Phil:
So a spime is this computer thing that knowswhere it is and is connected to the network and canmake measurements and maybe transmit that data to
Technometria: Spimes
www.openspime.com 
2
www.technometria.com
 
other things. What's the point? Why does anybody care?Why do you care, why did this excite you when youheard about it?
David:
The way technology goes, accelerating itsimpact through Moore's Law and other similar quantities like processing power or number of transistors which Moore's Law covers - becomes moreand more accessible, smaller and smaller, more andmore powerful and there are a lot of applications thatwere not really practical before that become very practical, very reasonable, and universally available ascertain thresholds are crossed. Global positioningthrough the GPS system, the Global Positioning Systemis one of these technologies and now you can put GPSeverywhere, anywhere. So why would you, and whywould you want to measure the environment valuesabout the environment? There are a lot of reasons andthe widest possible impact that I can formulate is thatreally the way we are structuring society, hasdisconnected from the rest of the world. Not only theenvironment of the natural world as we see it but alsoour urban life. Our buildings, our cities can not talk tous at a high frequency. Can not talk to us in a languagethat we can easily understand. And we must! Whether itis the natural environment that we lose contact with, or it is very simply a bridge that is straining under the loadof trucks and cars going through it, and it is about tocollapse. But we don't know until it's too late. Someasuring the environment is fundamentally importantin ways that we have just now started to understand.Our technology which we call the OpenSpimetechnology is going to make it so that people can applytheir creativity, their fantasy and come up withapplications forming a community of solutions that arecompatible and interoperable.
Rob:
Well I'll just add this, basically that it is importantto understand which are the scopes of OpenSpime -which is not only about providing connections. There isa lot of that which is related to social networking andwhen you really do understand what OpenSpime is allabout, and I hope that I will be able to, together withDavid to give you as much insight as possible. Basicallyit becomes instantly clear that the applications areendless since at OpenSpime we are providing aninfrastructure which allows any kind of application thatis needed, by any kind of person that needs to connectmultiple objects. I'm staying generic here, because thisis really what it's all about. We provide an infrastructure based on open source software which allows for peopleto communicate and to make spimes communicate,which means it can be both about governing data andalso about things which are much closer to instantmessaging between spimes and things like this. Thekind of applications that can have this is really endless.The CO2 example we are providing is just the prototype. We have started to make clear to everybodyhow easy it is to start from an Open hardware like, theexample you gave was a Sun Spot, but there's also inItaly for example a great company calledArduinowhichis providing very similar devices. To use these kinds of devices in a way that then, they become really, totallysocial.
Scott:
I'm really interested in hearing a few of thedetails of what will be provided in OpenSpime. Whatare the services or the API's, what is it that you're providing with that?
Rob:
Ok, let me start just by saying a very simple thing.When you think about OpenSpime, the thing that you better start with is actually considering two aspects of OpenSpime. You can consider us somewhere in betweenthings like Google developers applications, the API'sthat are delivered by using developer keys andidentifications like this. The other side, somethingwhich is close to let's say, DNS services like the one provided by Internic where the information is actually public on how to connect the various servers in theworld. On top of that we just need to consider the factthat we are adding a layer of security and certification ina way that objects can communicate. It sounds always pretty complicated to discuss architecture, especially ina podcast where I can't give you any images. I think the best way anyways is to go by example, becauseexamples are a great thing and basically allow us tounderstand why an architecture has been setup in acertain way and this will lead to answering your question, "What is going to be provided?" Does thatwork for you?
Scott:
Yes perfect.
Rob:
Let me start with the simplest example ever.You just have a spime, as David has already explained is just a device which is aware of where it is situated andhas a series of abilities to communicate. Let's see thatyou have a piece of open hardware like the Arduino or aSun Spot that you first started the conversation with.You can also imagine that the spime may be almostanything because an iPhone can become a spime if it isconnecting, providing data and wanting to communicatewith other iPhones. Really a spime is a very genericterm. Let's start with a very simple example that you arelike me a little bit, a computer geek, you like to haveyour open hardware and sometimes move componentsaround see what's happening and override the blinks.
Technometria: Spimes
www.openspime.com 
3
www.technometria.com

Activity (4)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
Stefano Salati liked this
Stefano Salati liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->