Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
6Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Vilatte Heritage

Vilatte Heritage

Ratings:

4.0

(1)
|Views: 570|Likes:
Joseph René Vilatte was a Catholic of the Latin rite. As the direct or indirect progenitor of many Catholic and Orthodox Churches in America, France (his last years), and all over the world eventually. He is, so to speak, also the « father » of the Apostolic Succession of the Gallican Church of Mgr. Giraud and the Gnostic Church, in its apostolic branch, of Mgr. Bricaud and Mgr. Constant Chevillon only. His life and his work in Europe and in the United States are well-known from many books and articles, but there is a period that the historians seem to neglect: his return to Paris in 1924, his retirement in Versailles and his death.
Joseph René Vilatte was a Catholic of the Latin rite. As the direct or indirect progenitor of many Catholic and Orthodox Churches in America, France (his last years), and all over the world eventually. He is, so to speak, also the « father » of the Apostolic Succession of the Gallican Church of Mgr. Giraud and the Gnostic Church, in its apostolic branch, of Mgr. Bricaud and Mgr. Constant Chevillon only. His life and his work in Europe and in the United States are well-known from many books and articles, but there is a period that the historians seem to neglect: his return to Paris in 1924, his retirement in Versailles and his death.

More info:

Published by: Philippe L. De Coster on Apr 05, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

01/29/2013

pdf

text

original

 
Latin Old Roman Catholic Churchof Flanders
(Independent from Rome and Utrecht)
© 2006-2007 Mgr Philippe Laurent De Coster
Monsignor Joseph René Vilatte,Mar Timotheus,Old Catholic Archbishop of North America,And First Primate of the American CatholicChurchandMonsignor Jean BricaudFounder of Gnostic Catholic Church
(Biographical and Historical Accounts from various sources)
Compilation by Mgr. Philippe L. De Coster, B.Th., DD
Publication Eucharist and Devotion
©
1993-2007 De Coster (Belgium)
 
2
Monsignor Joseph René Vilatte, Mar Timotheus,Old Catholic Archbishop of North America,And First primate of the American Catholic Church(
Biographical and
 
Historical Accounts from various sources
)
Joseph René Vilatte was a Catholic of the Latin rite. As the direct or indirectprogenitor of many Catholic andOrthodox Churches in America, France(his last years), and all over the worldeventually. He is, so to speak, also the «father » of the Apostolic Succession of the Gallican Church of Mgr. Giraud andthe Gnostic Church, in its apostolicbranch, of Mgr. Bricaud and Mgr.Constant Chevillon only. His life and hiswork in Europe and in the United Statesare well-known from many books andarticles, but there is a period that thehistorians seem to neglect: his return toParis in 1924, his retirement inVersailles and his death.He was born in Paris, the son of abutcher, on January 24, 1854. Hisparents belonged to the region of LaMaine in north-west of France, andadhered to “La Petite Eglise”. As the lastpriest of this Church died, he may havebeen baptised by a layman at first. Hismother died soon of his birth, andJoseph’s boyhood and early youth were spent in an orphanage at Paris under the charge of theBrothers of the Christian Schools. The sons of St John the Baptist de la Salle saw to it that hewas baptized conditionally (sub conditione), and that he was confirmed at Notre DameCathedral, Paris, in 1867. During the latter part of the Franco-Prussian War he enlisted in the“Garde National”. After the siege of Paris and the horrors of the Commune, he decided toleave France for Canada, having been attracted by the appeals for settlers in rural districts.Soon after landing on Canadian soil Vilatte found that a teacher was needed for a school nearOttawa at some distance from the nearest Catholic Church. He acted as catechist, and onSundays when there was no chance of getting to Mass conducted services. A certain priestseems to have been impressed by this pious young Frenchman, and taught him Latinprivately, not unusual in those days. After two years, having received his calling papers formilitary service the young Vilatte returned to France. On arriving at Paris, he was told thatseven years in the army would be required. To quote his very own words: “The spirit of liberty which I had imbibed in America, together with the memories of the horrors of theFranco-Prussian War, made me determined to leave my native land rather than re-enter thearmy. I went therefore to Belgium, and after a few months entered the Community of the
 
3Christian Brothers, a lay teaching Order at Namur.” Whether as a conscientious objector or asimple deserter, he was in danger of arrest and imprisonment, just as the future cure d’Ars, StJohn the Baptist Vianney, had been about sixty years before this, when he evaded militaryservice.Vilatte did not find his vocation with this institute, but left Belgium in 1876, feeling that hewas called to the secular priesthood, and sailed for Canada again. His next step was to offerhis services to Monsignor Fabre, Bishop of Montréal, who sent him to the College of Saint-Laurent, conducted by the Holy Cross Fathers, where he studied for three years. Vilatte relatesthat ‘the teaching of the seminary was so rabidly Romanist that all other beliefs werecondemned as heresies, which brought eternal damnation to all that accepted them. He said:“During my second vacation I learned that a famous French priest, Father Chiniquy, who wasdevoting his life to preaching against Roman error, announced in Montreal a series of lectures…I attended with great fear several of them and returned to the seminary with mymind much disturbed”.According to his own story he left the Seminary, and sought the advice of a French Protestantpastor in Montreal, a professor at McGill University (founded in 1821), who helped him tocontinue his studies there for two years. Bishop Grafton of Fond du Lac, who later on musthave gone to infinite trouble to investigate Vilatte’s past history, tells that after he returned toCanada in 1876, in addition to being a student at the College of Saint Laurent at Montréal(1876-1879), he also passed in and out of the Congregation of the Holy Cross, theDominicans, Friars Minor, Brothers of the sacred Heart, Brothers of St. Vincent de Paul, andthe Alexian Brothers. It is more than likely that he was the guest of these religious institutes atone time or another, but one ventures to think that the canonical conditions normally imposedwould have been made invalid, if not impossible, for him to be admitted to their respectivenovitiates all within four years. Bishop Grafton also reports that Vilatte worked withCongregationalists in Brooklyn, with the Presbyterians in Montreal, and that during the sameperiod he was reconciled with the Roman Church more than once, (in the religious way of thinking of those days, led by fear, as at that time he was much troubled by religious doubts).He relates that he ‘saw plainly that while on the other hand Romanism had added much errorand corruption to the primitive faith, Protestantism had not taken away Roman errors, but alsoa part of the primitive deposit of faith. In an effort to tranquil his mind round about 1882, heabandoned his studies at McGill University and, having been reconciled with the RomanChurch, retired to the house of the Clerics of St Viator, at Bourbonnais, Illinois, a communityof teaching priests and brothers, founded in 1835 by the Rev. Louis-Joseph Querbes in theArchdiocese of Lyon, which soon made foundations in Canada, and later in the U.S.A. Afterabout six months, still in a very worried state, he met Pastor Chiniquy again, and discussedhis spiritual problems with him. The advice given was that Vilatte should not return toBourbonnais but should go to Green Bay, Wisconsin, where there awaited him a wonderfulfield of apostolate among Belgian settlers, who, so it appeared, were ripe for conversion toProtestantism, for they were drifting from Romanism into spiritism and infidelity.Chiniquay also advised Vilatte to write to Hyacinthe Loyson (1827-1912), who had been aCarmelite friar and a famous preacher until he was excommunicated in 1869. After he marriedan American widow, and three years later he constituted a Church known as the GallicanCatholic Church.So it was in March 1884, with the blessing of two priests of the Latin rite, that Vilatte, still alayman, went northwards from Illinois to Wisconsin. He regarded himself as a freelance

Activity (6)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
Eques Vagans liked this
Theo Mascoll liked this
Tim Mansfield liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->