Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword or section
Like this
17Activity
P. 1
Great Fortunes

Great Fortunes

Ratings: (0)|Views: 349 |Likes:
Published by jarmatt

More info:

Published by: jarmatt on Dec 26, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

06/16/2012

pdf

text

original

 
 
GREAT FORTUNES, AND HOW THEY WERE MADE
Or, The Struggles and Triumphs of Our Self-Made Menby JAMES D. MCCABE, JR.,Author of Planting the Wilderness, etc., etc.“MAN, it is not thy works, which are mortal, infinitely little, and thegreatest no greater than the least, but only the spirit thou workestin_, that can have worth or continuance.”—CARLYLE.George Maclean,Philadelphia, New York and BostonElectrotyped at the Franklin Type Foundry, Cincinnati1871“The physical industries of this world have two relations in them: one to theactor, and one to the public. Honest business is more really a contribution tothe public than it is to the manager of the business himself. Although itseems to the man, and generally to the community, that the active businessman is a self-seeker, and although his motive may be self-aggrandizement,yet, in point of fact, no man ever manages a legitimate business in this life,that he is not doing a thousand-fold more for other men than he is trying todo even for himself. For, in the economy of God’s providence, every right and well organized business is a beneficence and not a selfishness. And not lessis it so because the merchant, the mechanic, the publisher, the artist, thinkmerely of their profit. They are in fact working more for others than they arefor themselves.”HENRY WARD BEECHER.
 
 PREFACE.The chief glory of America is, that it is the country in which genius and industry find their speediest and surest reward. Fame and fortune are hereopen to all who are willing to work for them. Neither class distinctions norsocial prejudices, neither differences of birth, religion, nor ideas, can preventthe man of true merit from winning the just reward of his labors in thisfavored land. We are emphatically a nation of self-made men, and it is to thelabors of this worthy class that our marvelous national prosperity is due.This being the case, it is but natural that there should be manifested by ourpeople a very decided desire to know the history of those who have risen tothe front rank of their respective callings. Men are naturally cheered and encouraged by the success of others, and those who are worthy of a similarreward will not fail to learn valuable lessons from the examples of the menwho have preceded them.With the hope of gratifying this laudable desire for information, and encouraging those who are still struggling in the lists of fame and fortune, Ioffer this book to the reader. I have sought to tell simply and truthfully thestory of the trials and triumphs of our self-made men, to show how theyovercame where others failed, and to offer the record of their lives as modelsworthy of the imitation of the young men of our country. No one can hopeto succeed in life merely by the force of his own genius, any more than hecan hope to live without exerting some degree of influence for good or evilupon the community in which his lot is cast. Success in life is not the effectof accident or of chance: it is the result of the intelligent application of certain fixed principles to the affairs of every day. Each man must make thisapplication according to the circumstances by which he is surrounded, and he can derive no greater assistance or encouragement in this undertakingthan by informing himself how other men of acknowledged merit havesucceeded in the same departments of the world’s industry. That this is trueis shown by the fact that many of the most eminent men attribute theirgreat achievements to the encouragement with which the perusal of thebiographies of others inspired them at critical periods of their careers. It isbelieved that the narrations embraced in these pages afford ampleinstruction and entertainment to the young, as well as food for earnestreflection on the part of those who are safely advanced upon their pathway
 
to success, and that they will prove interesting to all classes of intelligentreaders.Some explanation is due to the reader respecting the title that has beenchosen for the work. The term “Great Fortunes” is not used here todesignate pecuniary success exclusively. A few of the men whose lives areherein recorded never amassed great wealth. Yet they achieved the highestsuccess in their vocations, and their lives are so full of interest and instruction that this work must have been incomplete and unsatisfactoryhad they been passed over in silence. The aim of the writer has been topresent the histories of those who have won the highest fame and achieved the greatest good in their respective callings, whether that success hasbrought them riches or not, and above all, of those whose labors have notonly opened the way to fortune for themselves, but also for others, and havethus conferred lasting benefits upon their country.In short, I have sought to make this work the story of the _Genius of America_, believing as I do that he whose achievements have contributed tothe increase of the national wealth, the development of the nationalresources, and the elevation of the national character, though he himself bepoor in purse, has indeed won a great fortune, of which no reverse can everdeprive him. J.D. McC., JR.NEW YORK, 24
th
October, 1870.LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.CONSTERNATION AT SIGHT OF FULTON’S MONSTER (Frontispiece)GIRARD COLLEGEGIRARD’S HEROISMASTOR’S FIRST TRIP FOR FURS“MY MEN SHALL NOT SUFFER”PORTRAIT OF GEORGE PEABODYPEABODY PAYING FOR A NIGHT’S LODGINGPORTRAIT OF CORNELIUS VANDERBILTVANDERBILT EARNING HIS FIRST HUNDRED DOLLARSVANDERBILT CARRYING OFF THE SHERIFFFOUNDING A GREAT FORTUNEPORTRAIT OF ROBERT FULTONAN AMAZING REVELATION“THE MADHOUSE IS THE PROPER PLACE FOR HIM” WHITNEYWATCHING THE FIRST COTTON-GIN PORTRAIT OF ELIAS HOWE, JR.

Activity (17)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads
Manoj Verma liked this
fm_golani liked this
resumefwd8424 liked this
ubacus9653 liked this
johandupreez liked this
ziapsychoology liked this
bankcash liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->