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Jewish Search- Genealogy

Jewish Search- Genealogy

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Published by: bgeller4936 on Dec 30, 2009
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RESEARCH OUTLINE
Jewish Genealogy
CONTENTS
Introduction..............................1Jewish Search Strategies....................1Finding Jewish Records in the FamilyHistory Library Catalog..................5Maps of Jews in Europe....................7Archives and Libraries.....................9Biography..............................11Business Records and Commerce............12Cemeteries..............................13Census.................................15Chronology.............................17Church Records..........................18Civil Registration.........................18Concentration Camps.....................21Court Records...........................21Directories..............................22Divorce Records.........................22Emigration and Immigration................23Encyclopedias and Dictionaries.............24Gazetteers..............................25Genealogy..............................29Holocaust, Jewish (19391945).............31Inquisition..............................33Jewish History...........................33Jewish Records..........................35Language and Languages..................37Maps..................................38Military Records.........................39Minorities..............................41 Names, Personal.........................41 Naturalization and Citizenship..............45 Newspapers.............................45 Nobility................................47 Notarial Records.........................47Obituaries..............................48Occupations.............................48Orphans and Orphanages...................49Periodicals..............................49Population..............................50Probate Records..........................51Schools.................................52Social Life and Customs...................52Societies................................52Synagogue Records.......................55Taxation................................55Vital Records............................56Voting Registers.........................57Other Records...........................57For Further Reading.......................58Comments and Suggestions.................58Glossary................................59
INTRODUCTION
This outline introduces records and strategies thatcan help you learn more about your Jewishancestors. It teaches terminology and describes thecontent, use, and availability of major genealogical records.
Using This Outline
This outline will help you evaluate various recordsand decide which records to search as you traceyour Jewish ancestors. Records that are uniquelyJewish are listed, as are other general sources, thatmay contain the information you are searching for.These record sources are often created by thegovernment or other organizations and list detailsabout all people.This outline discusses in alphabetical order manymajor topics used for genealogical research, suchas “Archives and Libraries,” “Civil Registration,”and “Military Records.” “Church Records” arediscussed because many churches, which werestate churches of various countries, recordedinformation for Jews in certain time periods.Furthermore, where there were few Jews, Jewish births, marriages, and deaths were recorded by thelocal churches.At the end of this outline you will find a list of additional subject headings under “Other Records,” a short bibliography of sources under “Further Reading,” and a glossary.
JEWISH SEARCH STRATEGIES
Those doing research on Jewish families shouldfirst follow the genealogy strategies and methodsfor the area where the family was from. Researchoutlines and other research aids can help you learnabout records and formulate strategies. In additionto general sources, which list all of the populationincluding Jews, there are many books, indexes,and other resources that have been created for Jewish research in particular. This is not acomprehensive listing of Jewish records availableat the Family History Library but does listexamples of the major types of records available.
 
2The following basic steps for genealogical researchwill help get you started:
Step 1. Identify What You Know about YourFamily
Begin your research at home. Look for names,dates, and places in certificates, letters, obituaries,diaries, and similar sources. Ask relatives for anyinformation they may have. Record the informationyou find on pedigree charts and family grouprecord forms.
Step 2. Decide What You Want to Learn
Choose an ancestor to research for whom you knowat least a name, the town where he or she lived, andan approximate date of birth. The more you knowabout your ancestor, the more successful you will be with further research.It is best to begin by verifying the information youalready have. Then you can decide what else youwant to learn about that ancestor. You may want toask an experienced researcher or a librarian to helpyou choose a goal.
Step 3. Select a Record to Search
Effective researchers first find backgroundinformation. Then they survey compiled sourcesand finally they search original records. “For Further Reading” in this outline has a list of genealogy how-to books, both general andgeographically specific, that give information abouttracing Jewish ancestors.
Background Information Sources.
You musthave some geographical and historical information.This will help you focus your research in thecorrect place and time period.Find the place of residence. Use maps,gazetteers, histories, and other place-finding aidsto learn about each place where your ancestor lived. Identify governmental and ecclesiastical jurisdictions, local Jewish congregations, cities,counties, and other geographical features.Review local history. Jewish history and thehistory of the area your ancestor lived inaffected the records about the Jews. See“Gazetteers” and “Jewish History” in thisoutline for more information. If there is aresearch outline for the country or state whereyour ancestor lived, see “Gazetteers” and“History” in that outline.Learn about the jurisdictions of the placeswhere your ancestors lived. You will need toknow about civil and often church boundaries.See “Gazetteers” in this outline for moreinformation.Use language helps. Jewish records may be inYiddish, Hebrew, or in the language of thecountry of residence. Some church records for Jews may be in Latin. See “Language andLanguages” in this outline.
Compiled Records.
Surveying research alreadydone by others can save time and reveal valuableinformation. Check compiled sources such as:Private collections of family histories andgenealogies deposited in historical andgenealogical societies and other librariesPrinted family histories and genealogiesFamily histories, genealogies, and abstracts or transcripts of records on the InternetCompiled records of the Family History LibraryFamilySearch International Genealogical Index(IGI)FamilySearch Personal Ancestral File
Vital Records Index British Isles
and
Vital  Records Index North America
. See“Genealogy” in this outline for details aboutthese sources. Similar indexes for other countries are in production.
 Pedigree Resource File
These records are described in “Biography,”“Genealogy,” and “Societies” in this outline.Remember, information in compiled records mayhave some inaccuracies, and the information inthem should be verified.
Original Records.
After surveying previousresearch, you can begin searching originaldocuments, which are often handwritten andcopied on microfilm or microfiche. Originaldocuments provide first-hand informationrecorded at or near the time of an event by areliable witness. To do thorough research, youshould search:Jurisdictions that may have kept records aboutyour ancestor.Records of Jewish communities.
 
3Most researchers begin with civil registration,census records, church records, or probate records.
Step 4. Use the Internet
Many individuals and organizations have madefamily history information available on theInternet. This is particularly true of records pertaining to the Jews. Internet sites often refer toinformation others have placed on the Internet.These sites, also called home pages or web sites,are connected with other sites to create the WorldWide Web (www). Each site on the Internet has anaddress that enables you to go directly to that site.The most popular starting sites for genealogistsinclude:http://www.familysearch.org/http://www.cyndislist.com/http://www.usgenweb.org/http://worldgenweb.org/http://homepages.rootsweb.com/For Jewish research, the most helpful sites are:http://www.jewishgen.org/http://www.feefhs.org/You can use search engines to search a broad rangeof Internet sites that contain certain keywords. For example, if you want to find Jewish cemeteryrecords for a certain place, type in “Jewish” and“cemetery” and “Berlin” in a search engine, whichwill present a list of sites that contain these words.Different search engines search in different ways,so you may want to try more than one.Many books about using the Internet are availableat libraries and bookstores. Some list Internet sitesof interest to genealogists. Guides listed in thisoutline can be purchased from:Distribution Center 1999 West 1700 SouthSalt Lake City, UT 84104-4233LDS Distribution Centre399 Garretts Green LaneBirmingham B33 0UHEnglandYou can also order Family and Church HistoryDepartment resources through the Internet at:http://www.familysearch.org/
Step 5. Find and Search the RecordSuggestions for Obtaining Records.
You may beable to get the records you need in the followingways:Family History Library. The Library is open tothe public and charges no fees for using therecords. For more information, write to:Family History Library35 North West Temple StreetSalt Lake City, UT 84150-3400Family History Centers. The Family HistoryLibrary can loan copies of most records onmicrofilm to thousands of family historycenters worldwide. There is a small duplicationand postage fee for this service.Local Archives and Libraries. Although theFamily History Library has many records onmicrofilm or microfiche, others are availableonly at local or national archives and libraries.See the “Archives and Libraries” section of thisoutline for more information.Libraries and Interlibrary Loan. Public,academic, and other research libraries may havesome published sources for Jewish research.Many provide interlibrary loan services thatallow you to borrow records from other libraries.Look-Up Exchange. There are lists of people onthe Internet who will search various types of records for certain areas free of charge. Youcan locate these lists through Internet sites suchas:http://www.genuki.org/(for the BritishIsles)Jewish Genealogical Societies. JewishGenealogical Societies around the world haveinformation about their respective Jewishcommunities. Such information includes thehistory of, and relevant resources for, thatlocality. Some societies will do limited localresearch for you. A list of these societies can befound at:http://www.iajgs.org

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