Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
4Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Pilot Study of Charter Schools' Compliance with the Modified Consent Decree and the LAUSD Special Education Policies and Procedures

Pilot Study of Charter Schools' Compliance with the Modified Consent Decree and the LAUSD Special Education Policies and Procedures

Ratings: (0)|Views: 246 |Likes:
Published by Robert D. Skeels
Recent documents from the court appointed Office of the Independent Monitor for the Modified Consent Decree for LAUSD expose corporate CMO charter-voucher school discrimination and exclusivity. Very telling is the statement that children with disabilities are "significantly underrepresented" at CMO run corporate charter schools. Excerpt "During the 2008-2009 school year, the Office of the Independent Monitor (OIM) initiated a pilot study to examine the roles and impact of the District's charter schools on its performance toward achieving the requirements of the Modified Consent Decree (MCD) and compliance with federal and state special education laws and regulations."
Recent documents from the court appointed Office of the Independent Monitor for the Modified Consent Decree for LAUSD expose corporate CMO charter-voucher school discrimination and exclusivity. Very telling is the statement that children with disabilities are "significantly underrepresented" at CMO run corporate charter schools. Excerpt "During the 2008-2009 school year, the Office of the Independent Monitor (OIM) initiated a pilot study to examine the roles and impact of the District's charter schools on its performance toward achieving the requirements of the Modified Consent Decree (MCD) and compliance with federal and state special education laws and regulations."

More info:

Published by: Robert D. Skeels on Jan 01, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

06/30/2013

pdf

text

original

 
6/5/2009i
Pilot Study of Charter Schools’ Compliance with the Modified Consent Decreeand the LAUSD Special Education Policies and ProceduresOffice of the Independent Monitor
 Modified Consent Decree
June 5, 2009Executive Summary
During the 2008-2009 school year, the Office of the Independent Monitor (OIM) initiated a pilotstudy to examine the roles and impact of the District’s charter schools on its performance towardachieving the requirements of the Modified Consent Decree (MCD) and compliance with federaland state special education laws and regulations. The pilot was not intended to provide acomprehensive review of the special education programs at charter schools, but rather to providea description of select indicators and features based on readily available information. To examinethese issues, the pilot was guided by the following research questions:1.
 
Do the District’s policies and procedures pertaining to charters promote compliance withthe Modified Consent Decree, and federal and state special education law?2.
 
Do the District’s policies and procedures promote equitable access and opportunity forstudents with disabilities (SWD) for a free and appropriate education at a District schoolof choice, such as charter schools?3.
 
Does the District demonstrate the organizational capacity to ensure the implementationand oversight of its charter schools associated with the mandated activities of theModified Consent Decree and special education law?4.
 
Do charter schools present potential barriers or concerns related to the substantialsystemic compliance of the District’s special education programs and with the programaccessibility requirements under federal and state law?To address these questions, the OIM conducted the following:
 
A review of documents related to charter school policy and compliance with specialeducation law.
 
An external review of such documents by Sue Gamm, Esq.
 
Informal conversations/interviews with staff from the Charter School Division andDivision of Special Education.
 
Walk through of four selected charter schools.Highlights from the pilot are presented below:
 
6/5/2009ii
Charter School Policies and Compliance with the MCD, Special Education Law, andDistrict Special Education Policies and Procedures
To determine if the policies require compliance with specific elements of federal and specialeducation law and the MCD, a document review examined specific elements included within therelevant policies. The review found:
 
The documents contained direct language that articulates a charter school’s obligationsfor complying with the MCD, special education law, and District’s special educationpolicies and procedures.
 
The review noted several areas that contained thorough descriptions of the charters’responsibilities related to compliance with special education law, such as: thedocumentation of special education services, complaint response and due process.
 
Some areas identified as requiring additional information and/or clarification to ensurecompliance include: Child Find and Assessment; Discipline and Expulsion; Governance;and, Access Compliance.
 
Despite the clarity within the documentation that charters must adhere and comply withthe District’s special education policies and procedures, several challenges appear topresent barriers to achieve such compliance.
Enrollment of Students with Disabilities at Charter Schools
The LAUSD has 148 charter schools which serve approximately 58,000 students. This representsapproximately 15% of the District’s schools and 8% of its student population. Enrollment data isimportant when identifying whether a charter school’s policies promote equitable access forSWD. If the population of SWD attending charters is proportionate to that attending the DistrictOperated (DO) schools, it could be indicative of equitable access. Conversely, if differencesexist, it could be concluded that potential biases exist.During the 2008-2009 school year:
 
SWD attending charter schools made up 7.6% of the overall charter student population,while SWD consisted of 11.3% of the overall student population attending DO schoolswhich indicates that SWD are disproportionately under-enrolled at charter schools.
 
Students with low incidence disabilities attended charters representing 1.11% of the totalcharter enrollment, while students with low incidence disabilities made up 3.09% of theDO school population of SWD. Based on this, the relative risk ratio for students with lowincidence disabilities to be enrolled in charter schools is 0.36, which means that studentswith low incidence disabilities enrolled at LAUSD charters are significantly under-represented.
 
Differences in the enrollment of SWD were noted between affiliated, independentconversions and independent start-ups. These differences may be attributed to theaffiliated and conversion schools previous standing as a DO school.
 
6/5/2009iii
 
Policies and Procedures for the Recruitment, Enrollment and Retention of SWD at CharterSchools
Some of the areas within these policies that may be contributing to the disproportionateenrollment of SWD at charters may be related to the following processes: preference forpetitioners that provide a comprehensive learning experience for students that are academicallylow-achieving; identification of the demographic target population intended to serve; recruitmentplan for SWD; lottery/selection process for SWD; and, enrollment procedures of SWD. Thereview found:
 
A lack of clarity or absence of preferences for schools that provide a comprehensivelearning experience for a traditionally academically low-achieving group of students(students with disabilities), during the review process for the establishment of charters.
 
Both the new charter application and the initial screening matrix (checklist) sections didnot include nor require any reference to SWD in the identification of the schoolsdemographic subgroups.
 
Neither the application description, supplemental education program description, nor theChecklist addressed the petitioner’s anticipated recruitment of SWD.
 
Several areas of concern within the lottery/selection process such as: the absence of auniform application for the enrollment applications utilized by schools, and a lack of specificity of the role and oversight assumed by the District within the lottery selection.
 
The absence of guidance of the LAUSD’s authority to require charter schools to expandits provision of special education services when the District believes that doing so wouldenable a student to be appropriately educated in that school.
Availability of Programming and Services
 
During the 2008-2009 school year, 12 of 148 (8.1%) charter schools offered a special dayprogram as an option for serving SWD. In contrast, 87% of DO schools provided thissame program option. Collectively, the lack of such programs indicates adisproportionate availability of special education services offered at charters.
 
The disproportionate availability of such programs may indicate a lack of oversight andresponsibility by the District to ensure the equitable access to attend charter schools forSWD.
 
The charter application lacks clarity for independent start-up charters on its obligations toprovide transportation as a related service to SWD. This may be in violation of IDEAregulations particularly considering that the majority of charter schools do not offer anytype of transportation service.

Activity (4)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
Robert D. Skeels liked this
Sierra Jenkins liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->