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K Med Ethics 06 Q and A

K Med Ethics 06 Q and A

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Published by ssmiles75
Practice Questions
BRAIN DEATH

Conrad Fischer MD (2006) Kaplan USMLE medical ethics:100 cases you are most likely to see in the exam

1. An 80-year-old man is admitted to the hospital with a massive intracranial bleed. He has been placed on a ventilator because of the respiratory failure associated with intracranial herniation. When you try to remove the ventilator, there are no respirations. The patient makes no purposeful movements. There is no pupilary reaction when you shine a light in his
Practice Questions
BRAIN DEATH

Conrad Fischer MD (2006) Kaplan USMLE medical ethics:100 cases you are most likely to see in the exam

1. An 80-year-old man is admitted to the hospital with a massive intracranial bleed. He has been placed on a ventilator because of the respiratory failure associated with intracranial herniation. When you try to remove the ventilator, there are no respirations. The patient makes no purposeful movements. There is no pupilary reaction when you shine a light in his

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01/01/2013

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Conrad Fischer MD (2006)
Kaplan USMLE medical ethics:100 cases you are most likely to
see in the exam

Practice Questions
BRAIN DEATH
1. An 80-year-old man is admitted to the hospital with a massive

intracranial bleed. He has been placed on a ventilator because of the
respiratory failure associated with intracranial herniation. When you try to
remove the ventilator, there are no respirations. The patient makes no
purposeful movements. There is no pupilary reaction when you shine a
light in his eyes. There is no nystagmus on cold caloric question testing.
Oculocephalic and corneal reflexes are absent. He left no specific wishes
for his care. Which of the following is the most appropriate action
regarding this patent?
a. Remove the ventilator.
b. Make the patient DNR.
c. Place a nasogastric tube to prevent aspiration.
d. Get a court order authorizing you to remove the ventilator.
e. Do an EEG (electroencephalogram) three times separated by six hours
each time.

No Need for Further Studies When Brain Dead
1. A - Remove the ventilator.

The patient meets the criteria for brain death. These are: negative corneal
reflex, no
nystagmus in response to caloric stimulation of the tympanic membranes,
negative pupilary and oculocephalic reflexes, and the absence of
spontaneous respiration when the ventilator is held. If there are no
brainstem reflexes and the patient will not spontaneously breathe, then
the patient is brain dead. There is no hope of recovery in this
circumstance. An EEG is not necessary because the clinical presentation is
clearly consistent with brain death. Brain death is the legal definition of
death in the United States. Although the heart has continued to beat, it is
the same as taking the heart out of the chest and seeing it beat in a
specimen pan simply because of the automaticity of the heart's intrinsic
conduction pathway. When a patient is brain dead, you do not need to
seek court or ethics committee approval prior to stopping all therapy.
When a patient is brain dead, do NOT place a nasogastric tube for feeding
or hydrate the patient. The brain-dead patient is dead. This would be as
illogical as placing a nasogastric feeding tube in a cadaver on the autopsy
table. Remember, although you have legal right to turn off the ventilator
immediately on a person who is brain dead, you should talk to the family
first. If there is an answer that says "discuss" "conference," or any other
words indicating that you want to always achieve consensus first, then

that is the answer. The boards would greatly prefer you discuss the
matter with the patient's family first, prior to removing the endotracheal
tube.

CHILD ABUSE
2. You are a resident in the emergency department. An irate parent

comes to you
furious because the social worker has been asking him about striking his
child. The child is a 5-year-old boy who has been in the emergency
department four times this year with several episodes of trauma that did
not seem related. Today, the child is brought in with a child complaint of
"slipping into a hot bathtub" with a burn wound on his legs. The parent
threatens to sue you and says "How dare you think that about me? I' love
my son!" What should you do?
a. Give reassurance to the parents and treat, the patient's injury
appropriately.
b. Ask risk management to evaluate the case.
c. Admit the child to remove him from the possibly dangerous
environment.
d. Call the police.
e. Ask the father yourself if there has been any abuse.
f. Speak to the wife privately about possible episodes of abuse.
g. Explain to the parents that the next time this happens you will have to
call child protective services.
h. Report the family to child protective services.
i. Give the parents a referral to a family therapist they can see with the
child the following week.

Mandatory Reporting
2. H - Report the family to child protective services.

Although, in general, it is better to address issues directly with patients
and their families, this is not the case when you strongly suspect child
abuse. Reporting of child abuse is mandatory even based on suspicion
alone. Although it is frightening to be confrontational with the family, the
caregiver is legally protected even if there turns out to be no abuse as
long as the report was made honestly and without malice. You do not
have the authority to remove the child from the custody of the parents.
Only child protective services or the courts can do that. The police would
be appropriate for an assault happening at that exact moment, but the
police are not appropriate to investigate child abuse. When you have a
suspicion of child abuse, it doesn't matter what the parents say. That is
why talking directly to the mother or father is incorrect. When you suspect
abuse, even if the family denies it, you must still report.

CONFIDENTIALITY
3. You are working at the desk in your hospital when another employee of
the hospital asks for information about a patient who was admitted last

night with a pulmonary embolus secondary to cancer. You know the
details of the case. The person requesting the information states that he
is a close friend and co-worker of your patient. He shows you proper
identification proving he really is a co-worker of your patient who also
works in the hospital.Which of the following is the most appropriate
response to this requesta.
a. Give him the information on the patient.
b. Give him the information only if he is a relative of the patient.
c. Inform him that you are not at liberty to give details regarding the
patient
without the patient's permission.
d. Have him sign a release or consent form before revealing the
information.

Privacy of Health-Care Information in the Workplace
3. C - Inform him that you are not at liberty to give details regarding the
patient without the patient's permission.

Confidentiality is a fundamental right of all patients. As part of
maintaining the patient's autonomy in revealing information only to those
they wish to be informed of their condition you must refuse to release any
specific information of the patient's medical history or current medical
problems without direct permission from the patient. Respect this right
even if theperson asking is, indeed, a co-worker\u2014or even their superior.
You have no idea if medical information may be used to discriminate
against the patient. Separate from this, third parties have no automatic
right to a patient's medical information unless they are directly involved in
the care of the patient. This would hold true even if the person seeking
information is a health-care worker if they are not directly involved in the
care of the patient. Have the patient\u2014 not the person requesting the
information\u2014sign the consent form for release of information confirming
that they are giving you permission to release information.

4. You are seeing patients in clinic when two men in dark suits and dark

glasses come in and show you badges marking them as members of a
federal law enforcement agency. The identification is legitimate. These
"men in black" inform you that they are making a "minor investigation" of
one of your patients. They ask to look at the patient's chart for a few
minutes, saying, "You wouldn't want to interfere with a federal
investigation, would you?" What should you do?
a. Give them the chart.
b. Give them the chart but watch what they do with it.
c. Ask them to sign a release for the chart so you are absolved of
responsibility.
d. Tell them you cannot show them the chart unless there is a signed
release from the patient.
e. Tell them that you can give copies but not the original record.
f. Don't give them the chart but read the relevant information to them.

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