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Literary Terms #12

Literary Terms #12

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Published by: lmwummel on Jan 05, 2010
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Literary Terms #12
Palindrome:
a word, phrase, paragraph, etc. that reads the same backward or forward, likeracecar.
Panegyric:
a formal composition praising a person’s life, particular achievement, etc. Unlike aeulogy, usually about a dead person, a panegyric usually honors the living.
Parable:
like a fable, proverb, etc., a parable is a story illustrating a lesion. Unlike the others,the parable contains exact parallels to the situation it illustrates, and often uses “real” people inits narrative.
Paradigm:
a person, thing, idea, etc., which represents a very clear or typical example, orarchetype, of the entire group or set.
Parallelism:
a sentence, paragraph, line of verse, etc. which expresses a comparison givingequal stress and weight to ideas, concepts, phrases, etc.
Paraphrase:
a restating of an idea in different words or forms that retain the same meaning asthe original. Sometimes the paraphrase may be shorter than the original, sometimes it may belonger, but it is meant to put the idea into clearer perspective.
Parody:
is a work that imitates the style and/or tone of another work, often with the intent of ridicule.
Pastiche:
is an imitation of a work that may be used to parody another, or may simply be anattempt to duplicate the original in style and content.
Pastoral:
any work that seeks to celebrate the simple, “country” life
Pathetic fallacy:
originally attributed to Victorian art critic John Ruskin to denote theattribution of human feelings to natural phenomena, such as “The sea is a cruel mistress…” Ithad broadened to attribute such emotions to any inanimate object.
Pathos:
the stimulation, by a work of art, of deep feelings of pity, tenderness, etc.
Periphrasis (a.k.a. circumlocution):
to refer to something in a “roundabout” way. Often usedto obscure an idea that may be unpleasant when stated directly.
Peroration:
the conclusion and summing up of an oration.
Persona:
an assumed identity, taken from the Greek for “mask”, often applied to an author whois writing as another character. Persona may also refer to an assumed identity that is differentfrom one’s true nature.
Personification:
giving animals, objects, or even ideas, “human” qualities
Petrarchan:
a “conceit”, created by the poet Petrarch, which makes exaggerated comparisons.For example, a loved one, or an emotional state, or other person/object could be compared withsome hyperbolic other.
Phoneme:
the smallest possible unit of meaningful sound within a language.

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