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Responses to a Questionnaire Regarding Stress And

Responses to a Questionnaire Regarding Stress And

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Published by: teacherden on Jan 07, 2010
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Responses to a questionnaire regarding stress and coping skills were collected from 185 regulareducators and 225 special educators--teaching emotionally disturbed (ED), learning disabled (LD),mentally retarded (MR) or other types of handicapped children. Results demonstrated little differencebetween the regular and special educators' responses to both stress and coping. Both groups of teachers reported administrative variables, student behaviors, pressure, and paperwork as producingthe greatest amount of stress. More teachers of ED and LD children than teachers of MR or otherhandicapped children reported the administration as their most common source of stress. ED teachersreported conflicts between themselves and other staff members, as well as no student progress, to bemore stressful than other special educators. MR teachers reported inappropriate student behaviorsless frequently (15%) than either ED or LD teachers as a source of stress; and only 2% of the otherspecial educators saw inappropriate student behaviors as a source of stress. LD teachers and otherspecial educators reported internalizing stress as a coping mechanism more frequently than either MRor ED teachers. All groups of teachers reported internalizing stress, talking to a safe person, andengaging in alternative activities as the most common methods of coping with stress. (DB
Stress and Coping: A Comparison of Regular and SpecialEducators.
Education resource info centerwww.eric.gov 
School climate, sense of efficacy and Israeli teachers¶ attitudestoward inclusion of students with special needs
Amatzia Weisel
Tel Aviv University
Orit Dror 
Tel Aviv University
This article examines the effects of school organizational and
 
educational climate, and a teacher¶s sense
 
of efficacy, on general education teachers¶
 
attitudestoward inclusion of students with special needs. The
 
sample included 139 teachers from 17 elementary
 
schools in the Northern District of Israel.
 
The results of Pearson correlation and multiple regression analyses
 
indicated that school climate and teachers¶
 
sense of efficacy as well as participation in
 
special educationtraining were positively associated with teachers¶ attitudes toward inclusion. Self-efficacy
 
was the single most important factor affecting
 
attitudes. School climateincluded six factors: supportive leadership; teachers¶ autonomy; prestige
 
of the teaching profession; renovations; teachers¶
 
collaboration; and workload.Examination of 
 
the intercorrelations among these factors and with attitudes
 
revealed that those teachers who perceived their 
 
school as having supportiveleadership, encouraged
 
renovations and collaboration but did not threaten teachers¶
 
autonomy, tended to express more positive attitudes
 
towards inclusion.
 
 A
ttitudes of Principals and Special Education Teachers Toward theInclusion of Students with Mild Disabilities
 
C
ritical Differences of Opinion
Bryan G.
C
ook
Department of Educational Foundations and Special Services at Kent State University,bcook@educ.kent.edu 
 
M
elvyn I. Semmel
University of California, Santa Barbara
M
ichael
M
. Gerber 
University of California, Santa Barbara
A
ttitudes of 49 principals and 64 special education teachers
 
regarding the inclusion of students with mild disabilities were
 
investigated. Results of a discriminantanalysis indicated that
 
principals and special educators were separated into groups
 
with 76% accuracy according to their responses to items drawn
 
from theRegular Education Initiative Teacher Survey (Semmel,
 
 Abernathy, Butera, & Lesar, 1991). items measuring attitudes
 
toward the efficacy of included placementswith consultative
 
services, the academic outcomes associated with included placements,
 
and the protection of resources devoted to students with mild
 
disabilitiescorrelated most highly with the discriminant function.
 
Findings are discussed in relation to their implications for 
 
the implementation of inclusion reforms and theeducational
 
opportunities of students with mild disabilities.
 
 
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