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Table Of Contents

PREFACE
1.0WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT PROBABILITY
1.3 When Events are Not Independent
1.4 In Summary
2.0 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS
2.1 Many Ways to be "Average"
2.2 Ways to Measure Spread
2.3 Introduction to Distributions
2.4 Testing Hypotheses
2.5 For Further Study
3.0SOME DISTRIBUTIONS AND THEIR USES
3.1 Discrete Distributions
3.1.1 The Binomial Distribution
3.1.2 The Poisson Distribution
3.1.3 The Hypergeometric Distribution
3.2 Continuous Distributions
3.2.1 The Normal Distribution
3.2.1.1 The Standard Normal Distribution
Table 3-2: Standard Normal Distribution Data
3.2.1.2 The Normal Distribution’s Role in Sampling
3.2.2 Various Other Useful Distributions, In Brief
3.2.2.1 The Lognormal
3.2.2.2 The Exponential
3.2.2.3 The Weibull
3.2.2.4 The Student t
3.2.2.5 The F Distribution
3.2.2.6 The Chi-Square Distribution
3.3 In Summary
4.0MEASURING RELIABILITY
4.1 General Principles
4.2 The Versatile Weibull Distribution
Table 4-1: Life Data
4.2.1 Caveats
4.3 Measuring Reliability of Repairable Systems
4.3.1 Testing for Trends
4.3.2 Confidence Limits when the Failure Rate is Constant
4.4 Measuring Reliability of "One-Shot" Products
5.0 DEMONSTRATING RELIABILITY
5.1 Zero Failure Tests
5.2 Tests Allowing Failures
5.2.1 Controlling the Producer’s Risks
5.3 Testing Under the Exponential Distribution
5.3.1 Sequential Tests: A Short Cut
5.4 Other Test Considerations
6.0 RELIABILITY GROWTH TESTING
6.1 Duane Growth Analysis
6.1.1 Least Square Regression
6.2 AMSAA Growth Analysis
7.0 SAMPLING (POLLING) AND STATISTICAL QUALITY CONTROL
7.1 Measuring Quality from Samples
7.2 Demonstrating Acceptability Through Sampling
7.3 Statistical Quality Control
7.3.1 Control Charts
7.3.2 Control Charts for Variables
7.3.3 Range Charts
7.3.4 Interpreting Control Charts
7.3.5 Controlling Attributes
7.3.5.1 Proportions
7.3.5.2 Rates
7.3.6 Caveat: "In Control" May Not Be "In-Spec"
7.3.6.1 Measuring Process Capability
7.3.6.2 Measuring Process Performance
8.0 USING STATISTICS TO IMPROVE PROCESSES
8.1 Designing Experiments
Table 8-2: Expanded Test Matrix
Table 8-3: Orthogonal Array
8.1.1 Saturated Arrays: Economical, but Risky
8.1.2 Testing for Robustness
8.2 Is There Really a Difference?
8.3 How Strong is the Correlation?
9.0 CLOSING COMMENTS
Critical Values of the F Distribution for Tests of Significance
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Practical Statistical Tools for the Reliability Engineer

Practical Statistical Tools for the Reliability Engineer

Ratings: (0)|Views: 2,767 |Likes:
Published by Tom1944
This book presents some basic material on probability and statistics and provides examples
of how they are used in reliability engineering. To keep the book short and uncomplicated, not
all subjects will be treated in detail and many more topics were ignored. Nevertheless, this text
should help the novice reliability engineer understand the utility of probability and statistics, and
can serve as a quick reference and refresher for the experienced engineer.
It is important to remember that reliability engineering is not just the application of
probability and statistics, and probability and statistics are not exclusively dedicated to reliability
engineering. Reliability engineering is the science of designing products and processes to be
reliable. Probability and statistics are simply tools that can help evaluate, predict, and measure
reliability, among other uses. However, it is important for every reliability engineer to be able to
use these tools effectively.
This book presents some basic material on probability and statistics and provides examples
of how they are used in reliability engineering. To keep the book short and uncomplicated, not
all subjects will be treated in detail and many more topics were ignored. Nevertheless, this text
should help the novice reliability engineer understand the utility of probability and statistics, and
can serve as a quick reference and refresher for the experienced engineer.
It is important to remember that reliability engineering is not just the application of
probability and statistics, and probability and statistics are not exclusively dedicated to reliability
engineering. Reliability engineering is the science of designing products and processes to be
reliable. Probability and statistics are simply tools that can help evaluate, predict, and measure
reliability, among other uses. However, it is important for every reliability engineer to be able to
use these tools effectively.

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Published by: Tom1944 on Jan 10, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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