Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Seth Johnson Comments on Preserving the Open Internet

Seth Johnson Comments on Preserving the Open Internet

Ratings: (0)|Views: 256|Likes:
Published by Differance
Assure the Principle of an Open Internet in Broadband by Designating a General Purpose Platform as a Category of Advanced Telecommunications Capability

Even if it were found that the FCC lacks regulatory authority to impose requirements for network neutrality, it can still establish correct principles by simply defining and tracking broadband offerings that fall into a category of a general purpose platform that serves the purpose of supporting application innovation, based on a number of principles expressed in protocols, distinguishing these offerings from more specialized types of service that may optimize particular applications at the expense of the general purpose platform. Such a categorization would allow the performance of such a platform to be identified and compared against other types of offerings. The manner in which the Internet protocols provide an optimally flexible platform produces network neutrality as an emergent phenomenon.
Assure the Principle of an Open Internet in Broadband by Designating a General Purpose Platform as a Category of Advanced Telecommunications Capability

Even if it were found that the FCC lacks regulatory authority to impose requirements for network neutrality, it can still establish correct principles by simply defining and tracking broadband offerings that fall into a category of a general purpose platform that serves the purpose of supporting application innovation, based on a number of principles expressed in protocols, distinguishing these offerings from more specialized types of service that may optimize particular applications at the expense of the general purpose platform. Such a categorization would allow the performance of such a platform to be identified and compared against other types of offerings. The manner in which the Internet protocols provide an optimally flexible platform produces network neutrality as an emergent phenomenon.

More info:

Published by: Differance on Jan 15, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

01/15/2010

pdf

text

original

 
Before theFEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSIONWashington, D.C. 20554In the Matter of))Preserving the Open Internet)GN Docket No. 09-191)Broadband Industry Practices)WC Docket No. 07-52
also:
International Comparison and Consumer)GN Docket No. 09-47Survey Requirements))National Broadband Plan)GN Docket No. 09-51)Deployment of Advanced)GN Docket No. 09-137Telecommunications Capability)COMMENTS OF SETH JOHNSONJanuary 14, 2010
Assure the Principle of an Open Internet in Broadbandby Designating a General Purpose Platformas a Category of Advanced Telecommunications Capability
 
Assure the Principle of an Open Internet in Broadbandby Designating a General Purpose Platformas a Category of Advanced Telecommunications CapabilityBy Seth JohnsonJanuary 14, 2010
I submitted substantially the same comments under NBP Public Notice #1, on defining the term “broadband.”The same points relate to preserving the open Internet and broadband industry practices.
Two Categories of “Advanced Telecommunications Service”
The National Broadband Plan must define "broadband" according to a proper and full concept of whatcapabilities constitute "advanced telecommunications service." Broadband in this conception is constituted of two things:1.a general purpose platform (in this document generally associated with the term "Internet" and itsconsensus protocols) which is optimized for maximum flexibility and application innovation, and2.certain other functions that may optimize particular applications but that may compromise theflexibility of the general purpose platform.
These Categories are Efficacious Even Without FCC Authority to Mandate Network Neutrality
Even if it were found that the FCC lacks regulatory authority to impose requirements for network neutrality,it can still establish correct principles by simply defining and tracking broadband offerings that fall into acategory of a general purpose platform that serves the purpose of supporting application innovation, basedon a number of principles expressed in protocols, distinguishing these offerings from more specialized typesof service that may optimize particular applications at the expense of the general purpose platform. Such acategorization would allow the performance of such a platform to be identified and compared against other types of offerings. The manner in which the Internet protocols provide an optimally flexible platformproduces network neutrality as an emergent phenomenon.
Delineating the General Purpose Platform
RFCs 1958, 2775, 3724, 4084, and 4924 illustrate how to distinguish protocols that provide for a generalpurpose platform from other types of protocols that may undermine principles that provide for a maximallyflexible platform for end-user innovation, such as the end-to-end principle, permissionlessness, best effortsdelivery of packets, and the transmission of Internet datagrams regardless of the application they aresupporting.The principle of transmitting Internet datagrams without regard for the applications they support alsoprovides for "network neutrality" as an emergent phenomenon.RFC 4924, "Reflections on Internet Transparency" (http://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc4924.txt) describes thematter as follows:A network that does not filter or transform the data that it carries may be said to be "transparent" or "oblivious" to the content of packets. Networks that provide oblivious transport enable the deployment of new services without requiring changes to the core. It is this flexibility that is perhaps both the Internet's
 
most essential characteristic as well as one of the most important contributors to its success."Architectural Principles of the Internet" [RFC1958], Section 2 describes the core tenets of the Internetarchitecture:However, in very general terms, the community believes that the goal is connectivity, the tool is theInternet Protocol, and the intelligence is end to end rather than hidden in the network.The current exponential growth of the network seems to show that connectivity is its own reward,and is more valuable than any individual application such as mail or the World-Wide Web. Thisconnectivity requires technical cooperation between service providers, and flourishes in theincreasingly liberal and competitive commercial telecommunications environment."The Rise of the Middle and the Future of End-to-End: Reflections on the Evolution of the InternetArchitecture" [RFC3724], Section 4.1.1 describes some of the desirable consequences of this approach:One desirable consequence of the end-to-end principle is protection of innovation. Requiringmodification in the network in order to deploy new services is still typically more difficult thanmodifying end nodes. The counterargument - that many end nodes are now essentially closed boxeswhich are not updatable and that most users don't want to update them anyway - does not apply toall nodes and all users. Many end nodes are still user configurable and a sizable percentage of usersare "early adopters," who are willing to put up with a certain amount of technological grief in order totry out a new idea. And, even for the closed boxes and uninvolved users, downloadable code thatabides by the end-to-end principle can provide fast service innovation. Requiring someone with anew idea for a service to convince a bunch of ISPs or corporate network administrators to modifytheir networks is much more difficult than simply putting up a Web page with some downloadablesoftware implementing the service.RFC 4924 then proceeds to list developments that may affect the advantages of the Internet's generalpurpose design based the end-to-end principle and the transmitting of packets without regard for theapplication they are supporting, including:
Application Restrictions
Quality of Service (QoS)
Application Layer Gateways (ALGs)
IPv6 Address Restrictions
DNS Issues
Load Balancing and Redirection
Security considerationsIn addition, RFC 4084, "Terminology for Describing Internet Connectivity" (http://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc4084.txt)provides a useful description of what constitutes "full Internet connectivity,"considering this question with regard to its design for flexibility, including stipulations about functions thatshould be disclosed to the purchaser if they are deployed. RFCs 1958, 2775, and 3724 more fully describethese issues that arise as various functions are proposed that may affect the Internet's design for greatestflexibility.
A Similar Approach: the Dynamic Platform Standards Project Proposal
A similar schema is presented by The Dynamic Platform Standards Project's legislative proposal for an"Internet Platform for Innovation Act" (http://www.dpsproject.com/legislation.html), which is designed todelineate the technical principles that provide for the special advantages of the design of the InternetProtocol. The DPS proposal provides a technical characterization of the general purpose platform as it isprovided by the Internet Protocol, including its provision of uniform treatment of packet flow, and similarlyallows the advantages of this kind of platform to be distinguished from other types of offerings.

Activity (2)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->