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Election Security in Nepal (CR 07-002)

Election Security in Nepal (CR 07-002)

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Published by INPROL

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Categories:Types, Research, Law
Published by: INPROL on Jan 21, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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02/22/2010

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E
LECTION
S
ECURITY IN
N
EPAL
 
INPROL Consolidated Response (07-002)
With contributions from Stephen Anderton, Zekria Barakzai, Jeff Fischer, Leon Sakamoto andNeil PouliotPrepared by J. O’Neil G. Pouliot andScott Worden
 
 
INPROL is a project of the United States Institute of Peace with facilitation support from the Center of Excellence for StabilityPolice Units, the Pearson Peacekeeping Centre, and the Public International Law & Policy Group.
 
E
LECTION
S
ECURITY IN
N
EPAL
 
INPROL Consolidated Response (07-002)
 January 26, 2007
Submitted by:
Leon Sakamoto, International Criminal Investigative Training AssistanceProgram (ICITAP), United States Department of Justice
Drafted by:
J. O’Neil G. Pouliot, INPROL Police Commanders Forum Facilitator andformer Chief Superintendent in the Royal Canadian Mounted Police andScott Worden,Rule of Law Advisor, U.S. Institute of Peace
With contributions from:
1. Stephen Anderton, Director of Projects, ArmorGroup2.Zekria Barakzai, Deputy Chief Electoral Officer, Independent ElectionCommission Secretariat, Afghanistan3.Jeff Fischer , Team Leader, Elections and Political Process, Creative Associates4.Neil Pouliot, Police Commissioner, UN Mission in Haiti (1995-6)The full text of the responses provided by these INPROL members can be found athttp://www.inprol.org/node/912. INPROL invites further comment by members.
 Note:
All opinions stated in this consolidated response have been made in a personalcapacity and do not necessarily reflect the views of particular organizations. INPROLdoes not explicitly advocate policies.
 
 
January 2007 INPROL Consolidated Response (
07-002 
) Page 1 of 9
E
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Background
:
Nepal is expected to conduct constituent assembly elections in 2007. ICITAP hasbeen approached to provide security training for the Nepalese police.
Query
:
What "election specific" perspectives on police education/training are availablethat would be useful for structuring election security training for local and nationalpolice, focusing in particular on the nuanced aspects of assuring public accessand transparency in the process while, at the same time, maintaining physicalsecurity and accountability of ballots?
Response Summary:
Election security is a specialized field presenting unique policing issues. Trainingprograms should be tailored to conditions in each context, as determined by adetailed threat assessment. The security response plan that is produced toaddress the threat should define police roles and responsibilities. Police trainingshould also take into account the way police and other security forces areperceived by the relevant communities. Instruction should seek to impart valuesof political neutrality, consistency, transparency, cooperation, and foresight.Accordingly, a training program for police tasked with providing election securityshould address the following:1. The elements of a threat assessment,2. The components of a security response plan, and3. Police training considerations.
1. Threat Assessment
A concise description of the electoral threat assessment process is provided byJeff Fischer based, in part, on his February 5, 2002 IFES white paper “ElectoralConflict and Violence: A Strategy for Study and Prevention.”The threat assessment seeks to identify and profile the likely victims,perpetrators and motives behind electoral conflict and violence. The victims canbe candidates, voters, monitors or media; however, electoral victimization can bedefined to include violence against electoral facilities, materials, or information.There are at least four categories of electoral violence that should be consideredin an electoral threat assessment:

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