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How Unilever palm oil suppliers are Burning up Borneo

How Unilever palm oil suppliers are Burning up Borneo

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Published by effective
GREENPEACE REPORT (APRIL 2008).
NEW EVIDENCE SHOWS EXPANSION BY
PALM OIL SUPPLIERS IS DRIVING
SPECIES EXTINCTION IN CENTRAL KALIMANTAN
AND FUELING CLIMATE CHANGE.
GREENPEACE REPORT (APRIL 2008).
NEW EVIDENCE SHOWS EXPANSION BY
PALM OIL SUPPLIERS IS DRIVING
SPECIES EXTINCTION IN CENTRAL KALIMANTAN
AND FUELING CLIMATE CHANGE.

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Published by: effective on Apr 20, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial No-derivs

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01/06/2013

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BURNING UPBORNEO
HOW PALM OIL SUPPLIERS ARE
www.greenp
eace.org
 
2
In November 2007, Greenpeace released
Cooking the Climate
, an 82-pagereport summarising the findings of a two-year investigation that revealed howthe world’s largest food, cosmetic and biofuel companies were driving the wholesale destruction of Indonesia’s rainforests and peatlands through growingpalm oil consumption. This follow-up report provides further evidence of the expansion of the palm oilsector in Indonesia into remaining rainforests, orang-utan habitat and peatlandsin Kalimantan. It links the majority of the largest producers in Indonesia toUnilever, probably the largest palm oil corporate consumer in the world.Unilever uses 1.3Mt of palm oil or palm oil derivative every year – about 3%of global production.
1
 About half of Unilever’s palm oil supply comes fromIndonesia.
2
 As recently as 2005, Unilever purchased 1 in every 20 tonnesproduced in the country.
3
Unilever has failed to use its power to lead the palm oil sector towardsustainability, either through its own palm oil purchasing – its primary suppliersin Indonesia represent over a third of the country’s palm oil production
4
– or through its role as leader of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), whose members represent 40% of global palm oil production.
5
 Through analysis of maps, satellite data, and on-the-ground investigationsbetween February and April 2008, Greenpeace has mapped out howexpansion of the oil palm plantations in Central Kalimantan is fuellingclimate change and helping drive orang-utans to the brink of extinction. AsGreenpeace investigations show, this expansion into the Indonesian territoryof the island of Borneo has in large part been led by companies who areUnilever suppliers and RSPO members.
 
NEW EVIDENCE SHOWS EXPANSION BYPALM OIL SUPPLIERS IS DRIVINGSPECIES EXTINCTION IN CENTRAL KALIMANTAN AND FUELING CLIMATE CHANGE
 
 This destruction is set to get worse. By 2030, demand for palm oil is predictedto more than double that of 2000.
6
Between 2006 and 2016 alone, palm oilproduction is set to increase by close to 15Mt.
7
 To meet this growth in demand, major producers including Unilever suppliersand RSPO members are expanding their plantation areas into forests andpeatlands in Indonesia.
8
 This expansion – often illegal
9
and in breach of RSPOprinciples and criteria
10
– is not only bad for wildlife, it is also bad for the climateand bad for governance.Unilever itself is implicated in the impacts of this expansion through rapidlygrowing brand platforms that use significant quantities of palm oil and palm oilderivatives from companies operating in Indonesia. Product brands and brandplatforms include
 Dove
,
 Dirt is Good
(
 Persil 
,
Omo
,
Surf Excel 
),
 Knorr 
,
 HeartBrand
(
Walls
) and
 HealthyHeart 
(
 Flora/Becel 
).Greenpeace investigations provide new evidence that it is Unilever’s own palmoil traders and producers (themselves RSPO members) who are leading‘aggressive expansion’ of the sector that results in the devastation of the lastremaining orang-utan rainforest and peatland habitat in Borneo.By failing to apply and enforce RSPO principles and criteria to both traders andproducers at group level, Unilever has failed to bring the rapidly expandingpalm oil sector under control. The growth of global brands and brand platformssuch as
 Dove
and
 Dirt is Good
is creating incentives for Unilever’s suppliers toexpand, ‘leading to the devastation of the last remaining rain forests inBorneo’.
11
 As it stands, Unilever suppliers are driving species extinction, climatechange through the significant greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions linked todeforestation and peatland destruction, and land conflict with forest-dependentcommunities.Given the urgent nature of the crisis, the only solution for the global climate,the regional environment, the wildlife and the forest-dependent communitiesrelying upon Indonesia’s forest resources is a moratorium on oil palmexpansion into rainforest and peatland areas.
3

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