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Technical Series Vol. 4 No. 1 April

Technical Series Vol. 4 No. 1 April

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Published by Jon

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Categories:Types, Research, Science
Published by: Jon on Jan 26, 2010
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06/02/2012

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Technical SeriesVol. 4 No. 1April 1979GUIDE TO SHALLOW-WATER MYSIDS FROM FLORIDAByDOUGLAS H. FARRELLDEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONTAMPA, FLORIDAState of FloridaDepartment ofEnvironmental Regulation
 
CONTENTSIntroduction.......................................... 1Biological Considerations............................. 3Specimen Preparation.................................. 6Glossary.............................................. 7Key to Adults.........................................10SubfamilySiriellinae.............................18Siriella............................18SubfamilyGastrosaccinae..........................19Anchialina..........................19Bownaniella.........................19SubfamilyMysinae.................................22Amathimysis.........................22Heteromysis.........................23Ta
 
phromysis.........................25Brasilomysis........................26Mysidium............................27Dio
 
ptromysis........................30Metamysido
 
psis......................31Literature Cited......................................38Figures...............................................42Index to Species......................................71i
 
1IntroductionIn almost any gathering of ecologists orenvironmental biologists, the conversation eventuallyturns to problems in systematics, usually the lack ofcomprehensive identification guides to many of the moreimportant groups. With the increasing use of bioticindices, such as species diversity or others utilizinginformation theory, specific identification becomesincreasingly important. This is particularly true whensuch indices become components of the regulationsgoverning pollution of our aquatic resources. In theoryspecific identification is not required for a biologicalindex if the species can be accurately separated. However,in practice such attempts often prove to be somewhat lessthan satisfactory. This problem is best exemplified by thestudies of haustoriid amphipods conducted by Dr. E. L.Bousfield (1965). Before these studies about six speciesof haustoriids were thought to occur along the New Englandcoast. By the time Dr. Bousfield had finished, these sixspecies had been expanded to ten genera and 20 species.During the past few years the taxonomy of many small,

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