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Farmer Toasts Victory in Raw Milk Trial With Glass of the Contentious Drink

Farmer Toasts Victory in Raw Milk Trial With Glass of the Contentious Drink

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Published by reanthal
Your right to choose what to EAT, DRINK, and SMOKE should by known by all that it is an absolute MUST if you want to actually be 'FREE'. FREEDOM as a human does not mean another human, somewhere is profiting by limiting your choices. Our actions against another, or another's 'property' should be the law... NOT how we live our lives in regards to nature, one another and, well, having OUR experiences, not the experiences determined by another.
Your right to choose what to EAT, DRINK, and SMOKE should by known by all that it is an absolute MUST if you want to actually be 'FREE'. FREEDOM as a human does not mean another human, somewhere is profiting by limiting your choices. Our actions against another, or another's 'property' should be the law... NOT how we live our lives in regards to nature, one another and, well, having OUR experiences, not the experiences determined by another.

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Published by: reanthal on Jan 26, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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01/26/2010

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Ont.
 
 farmer 
 
toasts
 
victory 
 
in
 
raw 
 
milk 
 
trial 
 
with
 
 glass
 
of 
 
the
 
contentious
 
drink 
 
Thu
 
 Jan
 
21,
 
6:55
 
PM
 
By 
 
Ciara
 
Byrne,
 
The
 
Canadian
 
Press
 
http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/capress/100121/national/raw_milk_trial 
 
NEWMARKET,
 
Ont.
Clutching
 
a
 
glass
 
of 
 
raw 
 
milk,
 
an
 
emotional 
 
Michael 
 
Schmidt 
 
toasted 
 
what 
 
he
 
called 
 
a
 
victory 
 
 for 
 
the
 
local 
 
 food 
 
movement 
 
Thursday 
 
after 
 
the
 
Ontario
 
dairy 
 
 farmer 
 
was
 
 found 
 
not 
 
guilty 
 
of 
 
19
 
charges
 
related 
 
to
 
selling
 
unpasteurized 
 
milk.
 
"People
 
need 
 
to
 
learn
 
how 
 
to
 
stand 
 
up
 
even
 
when
 
it 
 
seems
 
it's
 
impossible
 
to
 
achieve
 
change
 
in
 
our 
 
interpretation
 
of 
 
the
 
law," 
 
said 
 
Schmidt,
 
who
 
was
 
often
 
depicted 
 
by 
 
supporters
 
as
 
the
 
small 
 
 farmer 
 
 fighting
 
 for 
 
consumer 
 
 food 
 
rights
 
against 
 
an
 
established 
 
milk 
 
industry.
 
In
 
a
 
legal 
 
battle
 
that 
 
 played 
 
out 
 
over 
 
three
 
years,
 
Schmidt 
 
 fought 
 
to
 
continue
 
the
 
operation
 
of 
 
his
 
150
member 
 
raw 
 
milk 
 
co
operative
 
in
 
Durham,
 
Ont.,
 
and 
 
defended 
 
himself 
 
against 
 
the
 
charges
 
 for 
 
dispensing
 
milk 
 
straight 
 
 from
 
the
 
cow.
 
Schmidt 
 
was
 
charged 
 
under 
 
the
 
Health
 
Protection
 
and 
 
Promotion
 
 Act 
 
and 
 
the
 
Milk 
 
 Act 
 
after 
 
an
 
armed 
 
raid 
 
by 
 
about 
 
two
 
dozen
 
officers
 
and 
 
government 
 
officials
 
at 
 
his
 
 farm
 
in
 
2006.
 
While
 
raw 
 
milk 
 
is
 
legal 
 
to
 
drink,
 
it's
 
illegal 
 
to
 
sell 
 
in
 
Canada.
 
Officials
 
consider 
 
it 
 
a
 
health
 
hazard.
 
Under 
 
Schmidt's
 
cow 
share
 
 program
 
each
 
member 
 
of 
 
his
 
co
operative
 
owns
 
a
 
 part 
 
of 
 
the
 
cow.
 
By 
 
owning
 
the
 
cow 
 
members
 
were
 
drinking
 
milk 
 
 from
 
their 
 
own
 
animal,
 
he
 
says.
 
On
 
Thursday,
 
 justice
 
of 
 
the
 
 peace
 
Paul 
 
Kowarsky 
 
ruled 
 
that 
 
Schmidt's
 
method 
 
of 
 
distribution
 
made
 
the
 
group
 
exempt 
 
 from
 
the
 
legislation.
 
He
 
also
 
 found 
 
the
 
operation
 
did 
 
not 
 
violate
 
the
 
 province's
 
milk 
marketing
 
or 
 
 public
health
 
regulations.
 
Kowarsky 
 
said 
 
the
 
Crown
 
could 
 
not 
 
 prove
 
that 
 
Schmidt 
 
had 
 
tried 
 
to
 
market 
 
the
 
milk.
 
It 
 
was
 
made
 
clear 
 
on
 
signs
 
at 
 
the
 
 farm
 
and 
 
at 
 
the
 
blue
 
bus
 
where
 
Schmidt 
 
set 
 
up
 
shop
 
at 
 
a
 
Vaughan,
 
Ont.,
 
market 
 
that 
 
only 
 
members
 
could 
 
 purchase
 
 products
 
made
 
 from
 
raw 
 
milk,
 
he
 
added.
 
"The
 
undisputed 
 
evidence
 
of 
 
the
 
defendant 
 
is
 
that 
 
there
 
is
 
no
 
advertising
 
or 
 
selling," 
 
said 
 
Kowarsky.
 
The
 
legislation
 
was
 
originally 
 
created 
 
to
 
 protect 
 
the
 
vulnerable,
 
but 
 
the
 
cow 
share
 
members
 
were
 
not 
 
vulnerable
 
and 
 
were
 
cognizant 
 
of 
 
all 
 
concerns
 
associated 
 
with
 
drinking
 
unpasteurized 
 
milk,
 
he
 
added.
 
"They 
 
consume
 
the
 
milk 
 
at 
 
their 
 
own
 
risk," 
 
said 
 
Kowarsky,
 
adding
 
the
 
 product 
 
had 
 
been
 
thoroughly 
 
tested 
 
and 
 
was
 
shown
 
not 
 
to
 
be
 
contaminated.
 
 At 
 
trial,
 
 food 
 
scientists
 
and 
 
health
 
experts
 
testified 
 
that 
 
mandatory 
 
 pasteurization
 
laws
 
are
 
needed 
 
to
 
 protect 
 
 public
 
health.
 
Schmidt 
 
argued 
 
that 
 
government 
 
officials
 
and 
 
 food 
 
scientists
 
could 
 
not 
 
guarantee
 
the
 
safety 
 
of 
 
any 
 
 food,
 
and 
 
suggested 
 
informed 
 
consumers
 
should 
 
be
 
able
 
to
 
buy 
 
raw 
 
milk 
 
if 
 
they 
 
want.
 

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