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Champagne - Sparkling Wine

Champagne - Sparkling Wine

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Published by Brainwines.com
On the Bubble with Champagne
The sublime flavours of yeast carcass, exploding bottles, sparkle capture, and smaller as actually better.

That feeling in your guts when you’re about to heave from the smell of something rotten is an evolutionary and valuable muscle contraction designed to ensure we don’t eat dangerous, bacteria-laden food. The tang of rotting fish; the layered stench of an overripe, molded and almost crawling cheese; and the tangible face-spank of a degassing...
On the Bubble with Champagne
The sublime flavours of yeast carcass, exploding bottles, sparkle capture, and smaller as actually better.

That feeling in your guts when you’re about to heave from the smell of something rotten is an evolutionary and valuable muscle contraction designed to ensure we don’t eat dangerous, bacteria-laden food. The tang of rotting fish; the layered stench of an overripe, molded and almost crawling cheese; and the tangible face-spank of a degassing...

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Published by: Brainwines.com on Jan 28, 2010
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11/25/2012

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hat eeling in your guts when you’re aboutto heave rom the smell o somethingrotten is an evolutionary and valuablemuscle contraction designed to ensure we don’teat dangerous, bacteria-laden ood. Te tang o rotting sh; the layered stench o an overripe,molded and almost crawling cheese; and thetangible ace-spank o a degassing, bloatedcarcass are all proud members o 
 guild vomitas
.Apparently, the taste maniestations o a longdeath are not high on our culinary avoriteschart. Exceptions occur such as “1,000 year-old”eggs, ermented sh sauce, “stinky tou”, and,surprisingly, Champagne. urns out that thesublime avours o Champagne come rom ungicarcass discharges over the many months thatyeasts stew in your avorite bottle o bubbly. Yes,the beverage much o the adult world associateswith class, revelry and reshness obtainsits signature avour by a long and intimateassociation with death. Keep that in mind nexttime you raise a ute to, ironically, lie.
On the Bubble with Champagne
By Keith B. Hofman
Th sub avous of yast cacass, xpodngbotts, spak captu, and sa as actuay btt.
SoilS, GrapeS and Flavour
Te soils o the Champagne region o northeastFrance are ull o chalk, which lends itsel not only to easy excavations or cellar construction, butretains moisture well and is rich in nitrogen. Telatter two characteristics are quite benecial orgrape production and are even more importantin Champagne, as grape yields are naturally lowerbecause the climate is signicantly cooler thanmost wine-growing regions.Champagne is almost exclusively maderom the juice o Pinot Noir, Pinot Meunier andChardonnay grapes. Te Pinots give the winebackbone and lengthy nish, sometimes alsoreerred to as its “carpentry”. Te Chardonnay adds biscuit avours and needed acid. Tis acidcomponent ensures a long lie or the wine and isthereore crucial to Champagne, as the wine needsto be aged or many months prior to drinking.Te charisma o Champagne builds aferabout eight to 10 months in the bottle, at whichtime the yeasts begins to die and break open.
È
Don’t judge a bottle by its label. Champagne is actually the product of yeast and fungi discharge.
Proteins, volatile substances, and individualamino acids slowly relocate rom the walls andguts o the yeasts into the wine. Tis is sometimestermed the “awakening” o the wine, and thisleeching constructs the aromas and tastes thatset Champagne apart.Afer at least 15 months, this detritus,known as “lees” is slowly collected, via gravity,
label basics
Blanc de BlancS
—White winemade rom only white grapes, in thiscase Chardonnay.
Blanc de noirS
—White wine made romonly the juice o red grapes, like Pinot Noirand Pinot Meunier. I the skins were used, thewine would have a pink to red tint and wouldthereore not be termed “blanc”.Added sugar, in grams per litre (g/l): extrabrut (none), brut nature (less than 3), brut(less than 15), extra-dry (rom 12-20), sec(17-35), demi-sec (33-50), and doux (50).
È
Champagne: it all stems from special grapes.
 
in the neck o the bottle. Te neck o the bottleis typically rozen solid, the top taken o, and,due to the internal gas pressure, the lees slowly sel-extrude out o the bottle in a solid gunk unit.Aer the lees are removed, a dosage o sugar isadded directly to the bottle to determine the nalsweetness level, rom no sugar added (extra brut)to a large dollop (doux). Cork is inserted, wiremesh axed, and labels pasted. Te caging o joy or another day complete.
Those BuBBles
“Nucleation sites” are a general term or a locationwhere bubbles can orm. o make sure you getproper bubbliciousness, be sure to wipe downyour futes with a cloth prior to pouring. Sciencehas inormed us that the little bers le over romthe wiping will operate as excellent bubble genesissites. Te resultant globes o carbon dioxide gasdo some wacky things. Tey can spring romthe nucleation locales in singles, doubles, triplesand even in a group o a dozen. Teir patternscan last or just moments, or many minutes
know your...
Only 82,000 acres make up the ocial Champagne growing region. Temajor Champagne houses control a scant 10 percent o this land, yet theirexports amount to most o the Champagne in the world outside France.
19,000 individual growers oversee the remaining 90 percent o grapesnot controlled by the big houses, and their Champagnes are becomingmore accepted outside France with each harvest.
Te total planted acreage o the individual grapes is approximately 38percent Pinot Noir, 34 percent Pinot Meunier, and 28 percent Chardonnay.
Only the juice rom the grapes is used, and all juice rom either red orwhite grapes is clear. Great care is taken to ensure that none o the skinpigments, so coveted in red wine production, leech into the wine. Grapepressing techniques are thereore very gentle.
300 million bottles are produced each year in the Champagne region.
In most cases, the entire yield rom a single vine is required to makeone bottle.
Elegantly, the harvest begins each year 100 days aer the middleo the fowering period.
Te production rules in Champagne are staggering, with most producersnot even allowed to determine their own harvest dates. Harvest machinesare orbidden and all grapes must be taken during one session, etc.
Most Champagne is non-vintage, meaning it’s a blend o dierentyearly harvests. I you see a year on the label it signies a particularly good harvest, and the wine inside has been aged or much longer thannormal Champagne.
Dom Perignon wasresponsible or much o Champagne’s eventualsuccess, but he wasoriginally the objecto some scorn romhis Abbey ellows. Ademand was made orhim to rid the wine o bubbles, as the bottleswere quite prone tospontaneous detonation.In act, in the 1700smassive bursts, includingchain reactions, wereso common thatcellar workers had toadorn themselves inunwieldy iron masksand heavy clothing toprevent injury. I youcan visualise thousands o glass bottles in ront o you, all primed toexplode and pierce you with razors o glass, one can imagine that thecellar employees o old were notably anxious.
Open your Champagne by holding the bottle at a 45-degree angle, andslowly rotate the bottle around the cork as you hold on to it. Ease the cork out with a slight “sigh”, not a “pop”. Te bubbles should be enjoyed in theglass, not on the foor.
ry not to wrap up the bottle like a swaddled newborn. Te label shouldbe proudly displayed.
Champagne faCTs
È
Pyrotechnic rendition of what goes on inside a bottle of Champagne–and in our heads once the cork ies.

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