Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more ➡
Standard view
Full view
of .
Add note
Save to My Library
Sync to mobile
Look up keyword
Like this
5Activity
×
P. 1
Adapting to Climate Change in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union

Adapting to Climate Change in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union

Ratings: (0)|Views: 3,115|Likes:
The climate is changing and many Eastern European and Former Soviet Union countries are vulnerable to the consequences. Many countries are facing warmer temperatures, a changing hydrology and more extremes, droughts, floods, heat waves, windstorms, and forest fires. Already the frequency and cost of natural disasters have risen dramatically in the region. And the concentration of greenhouse gases already in the atmosphere guarantees that similar or greater changes are yet to come, even if the world completely stopped emitting carbon dioxide. Now, and at least for the near future, ECA vulnerability is being driven more by its existing sensitivity than by the severity of the climate impacts. In fact, ECA already suffers from a serious adaptation deficit even to its current climate. This derives from a combination of socioeconomic factors and the Soviet legacy of environmental mismanagement. This report presents an overview of what adaptation to climate change might mean for ECA. It starts with a discussion of emerging best practice adaptation planning around the world and a review of the latest climate projections. The report then discusses possible actions to improve resilience organized around impacts on natural resources (water, biodiversity, and the coastal environment), health, the 'unbuilt' environment (agriculture and forestry), and the built environment (infrastructure and housing). The last chapter concludes with a discussion of two areas in great need of strengthening given the changing climate: disaster preparedness and hydrometeorological services.
The climate is changing and many Eastern European and Former Soviet Union countries are vulnerable to the consequences. Many countries are facing warmer temperatures, a changing hydrology and more extremes, droughts, floods, heat waves, windstorms, and forest fires. Already the frequency and cost of natural disasters have risen dramatically in the region. And the concentration of greenhouse gases already in the atmosphere guarantees that similar or greater changes are yet to come, even if the world completely stopped emitting carbon dioxide. Now, and at least for the near future, ECA vulnerability is being driven more by its existing sensitivity than by the severity of the climate impacts. In fact, ECA already suffers from a serious adaptation deficit even to its current climate. This derives from a combination of socioeconomic factors and the Soviet legacy of environmental mismanagement. This report presents an overview of what adaptation to climate change might mean for ECA. It starts with a discussion of emerging best practice adaptation planning around the world and a review of the latest climate projections. The report then discusses possible actions to improve resilience organized around impacts on natural resources (water, biodiversity, and the coastal environment), health, the 'unbuilt' environment (agriculture and forestry), and the built environment (infrastructure and housing). The last chapter concludes with a discussion of two areas in great need of strengthening given the changing climate: disaster preparedness and hydrometeorological services.

More info:

Publish date: Jan 28, 2010
Added to Scribd: Jan 28, 2010
Copyright:Attribution

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Buy the full version from:Amazon
See More
See less

11/14/2013

 
NLNU\GDC \J@HGKN\M @BNDCMGD MNP\MVD M]VJUMNDL @MD\VNH NPGN
Knvgnddm Inw( Vn`bmh G$ Fhj`o(ndl Andm Mfgdcmv(
Mlg|jvp
 
G
 
 \]VOKMDGP\ND
]VOKMDGP\ND
 \]VOMW
]VOMW
UJHNDL
JHNDL
FMHNV]P
MHNV]P
]OVNGDM
OVNGDM
VJKNDGN
JKNDGN
ONQNOBP\ND
NQNOBP\ND
V]PPGND IMLMVN\GJD
]PPGND IMLMVN\GJD
MP\JDGN
P\JDGN
HN\YGN
N\YGN
V]PPGND IML$
]PPGND IML$
HG\B]NDGN
G\B]NDGN
KJHLJYN
JHLJYN
F]HCNVGN
]HCNVGN
NVKMDGN
VKMDGN
CMJVCGN
MJVCGN
NQMVFNGAND
QMVFNGAND
B]DCNVW
]DCNVW
PHJYMDGN
HJYMDGN
@VJN\GN
VJN\GN
FJPDGN NDL
JPDGN NDL
BMVQMCJYGDN
MVQMCJYGDN
NHFNDGN
HFNDGN
IWV
WV
KN@MLJDGN
N@MLJDGN
@QM@B
QM@B
VMU$
MU
PHJYNO VMU$
HJYNO VMU
]QFMOGP\ND
QFMOGP\ND
OWVCWQ VMU$
WVCWQ VMU
 \NAGOGP\ND
NAGOGP\ND
PMVFGN
MVFGN
OJPJYJ
JPJYJ
KJD\MDMCVJ
JD\MDMCVJ
 
 \]VOKMDGP\ND \]VOMWUJHNDL
FMHNV]P
]OVNGDM
VJKNDGN
ONQNOBP\NDV]PPGND IMLMVN\GJD
MP\JDGNHN\YGNV]PPGND IML$HG\B]NDGNKJHLJYNF]HCNVGN
NVKMDGNCMJVCGNNQMVFNGAND
B]DCNVW
PHJYMDGN@VJN\GNFJPDGN NDLBMVQMCJYGDNNHFNDGN
IWVKN@MLJDGN@QM@BVMU$PHJYNO VMU$
]QFMOGP\NDOWVCWQ VMU$ \NAGOGP\ND
PMVFGNOJPJYJKJD\MDMCVJ
M]VJUM NDL@MD\VNH NPGN
\bgp knu snp uvjl}`ml fw |bm Knu Lmpgcd ]dg| ji \bm Sjvhl Fndo$\bm fj}dlnvgmp( `jhjvp( lmdjkgdn|gjdp ndl ndw j|bmv gdijvkn|gjd pbjsd jd |bgp knu lj dj| gkuhw( jd |bm unv| ji \bm Sjvhl Fndo Cvj}u( ndw a}lckmd| jd |bm hmcnh p|n|}p ji ndw |mvvg|jvw( jv ndw mdljvpmkmd| jv n``mu|nd`m ji p}`b fj}dlnvgmp$
GFVL 0<>72V>
PMU\MKFMV 6557
 \bgp vmujv| gp unv| ji n pmvgmp }dlmv|nomd fw |bm M}vjum ndl @md|vnh Npgn Vmcgjd ji |bm Sjvhl Fndo$Mnvhgmv vmujv|p bnym gdymp|gcn|ml ujymv|w( ajfp( |vnlm( kgcvn|gjd( lmkjcvnubw( ndl uvjl}`|gyg|w cvjs|b$\bm pmvgmp `jymvp |bm ijhhjsgdc `j}d|vgmp1NhfndgnNvkmdgnNqmvfngandFmhnv}pFjpdgn ndl BmvqmcjygdnF}hcnvgn@vjn|gn@qm`b Vmu}fhg`Mp|jdgnIWV Kn`mljdgnCmjvcgnB}dcnvwOnqnobp|ndOjpjyjOwvcwq Vmu}fhg`Hn|ygnHg|b}ndgnKjhljynKjd|mdmcvjUjhndlVjkndgnV}ppgnd Imlmvn|gjdPmvfgnPhjyno Vmu}fhg`Phjymdgn\nagogp|nd\}vomw\}vokmdgp|nd]ovngdm]qfmogp|nd
 
NLNU\GDC \J@HGKN\M @BNDCM GDMNP\MVD M]VJUM NDL@MD\VNH NPGN

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download