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Going all-out for human rights and sexual health - Aiming for results in Burkina Faso

Going all-out for human rights and sexual health - Aiming for results in Burkina Faso

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Published by practicecollection
Author of the approach: Eva Neuhaus
Peer reviewed by: Susan Leather, ILO, and Luise Lehmann, independent consultant
Writer: Stuart Adams
Published by the Secretariat of the German HIV Practice Collection
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) GmbH, December 2009

Officially launched in January 2004, the German-Burkinabe Sexual Health and Human Rights Programme (PROSAD) was chosen for write-up in the German HIV Practice Collection because, over the years, it has become a uniquely sustained, comprehensive and results-driven effort to protect and empower women, youth and children. It has helped raise their own and public awareness of their human rights, including their sexual and reproductive rights, and has provided them with a range of services and mechanisms that allow them to take advantage of those rights.

PROSAD has three components: The first focuses on youth and their needs for information and services in the areas of family planning, sexual and reproductive health, and prevention, care and treatment for HIV infection. The second focuses on women and girls and their needs for information about their basic rights and mechanisms they can turn to when their rights are violated, with special attention to stopping female genital mutilation (FGM) and to enrolling and retaining girls in school. The third focuses on children and their needs for protection from child trafficking and the worst forms of child labour.
Author of the approach: Eva Neuhaus
Peer reviewed by: Susan Leather, ILO, and Luise Lehmann, independent consultant
Writer: Stuart Adams
Published by the Secretariat of the German HIV Practice Collection
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) GmbH, December 2009

Officially launched in January 2004, the German-Burkinabe Sexual Health and Human Rights Programme (PROSAD) was chosen for write-up in the German HIV Practice Collection because, over the years, it has become a uniquely sustained, comprehensive and results-driven effort to protect and empower women, youth and children. It has helped raise their own and public awareness of their human rights, including their sexual and reproductive rights, and has provided them with a range of services and mechanisms that allow them to take advantage of those rights.

PROSAD has three components: The first focuses on youth and their needs for information and services in the areas of family planning, sexual and reproductive health, and prevention, care and treatment for HIV infection. The second focuses on women and girls and their needs for information about their basic rights and mechanisms they can turn to when their rights are violated, with special attention to stopping female genital mutilation (FGM) and to enrolling and retaining girls in school. The third focuses on children and their needs for protection from child trafficking and the worst forms of child labour.

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Published by: practicecollection on Jan 28, 2010
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 Ater this orum theatre presentation, the perormers will engage the audience indiscussion and debate about child labor and child tracking.
The Context
One o the poorest o the world’s poor countries, Burkina Fasoalso has one o the world’s highest rates o natural populationincrease. Burkinabe women have, on average, six childrenduring their child-bearing years. Families have more childrenthan they can easily aord and consequences include stunt-ing and malnutrition and the tendency o many amily headsto require that, instead o going to school, children work andcontribute to the amily economy.Burkina Faso is held back in part by the low status given toits women, youth and children by ethnic tradition, localcustom and widespread social attitudes and practices. Morethan one-third o school-age boys and almost one-hal o school-age girls are not in school. More than 80 percent o adult women are illiterate and, though the country’s lawsprovide them with basic human rights, most o them are notaware o their rights and have no access to mechanisms orredress i their rights are violated. A 2003 Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) ound thatmany women would like to use modern amily planning meth-ods but do not because men make amily planning decisions. Almost hal o all women have children beore their eighteenthbirthdays. Early marriage, orced marriage and sexual violenceare common. So are unwanted pregnancies and clandestineabortions, which account or 28 percent o all deaths in hos-pitals among young women (15 to 24). More than 76 percento women over the age o 15 have been excised, excision beingthe country’s most common orm o emale genital mutila-tion (FGM). Countrywide, the rate o HIV prevalence is 1.8percent and on the gradual decline, but rates vary rom 1.2percent to 3.8 percent across the country’s 13 regions and therate among young women (15 to 24) is almost twice the rateamong young men.Children o low status within their extended amilies are otenrequired to begin working in their amilies’ homes or elds atage six. Used to long hours o hard work, they participate inthe labour migration that is so common in West Arica andthis makes them highly vulnerable to tracking and the worstorms o child labour. An estimated ve percent o all Burki-nabe children rom 6 to 17 years old are labour migrants livingaway rom their parents and some 160,000 are believed to be
Going all-out for human rights and sexual health.
Aiming for results in Burkina Faso
 
To download the full version of this report andother publications in this collection, go towww.german-practice-collection.org
German HIV Practice Collection
This series of publications describes programmes supportedby German Development Cooperation that promote ‘promis-ing or good practice,’ meeting eight criteria, as assessed byan editorial board of HIV experts from German developmentorganizations and two international peer reviewers.There are short (four-page) and full versions of each publi-cation, with links to related tools and reading.Find out more atwww.german-practice-collection.orgorcontact the Managing Editor atghpc@giz.de.
victims o child tracking. Most migrating or tracked girlsgo to Burkinabe cities where they do domestic work and are oten sexually exploited. Most migrating or trackedboys, many less than 10 years old, go to Côte d’Ivoire wherethey work in agriculture and mines.
German HIV Practice Collection
 
The Programme on Sexual Health and HumanRights (PROSAD)
Ocially launched in January 2004, the Programme onSexual Health and Human Rights (PROSAD) builds on the work begun by a German-Burkinabe amily planningprogramme launched in 1995. It was chosen or write-up inthe German HIV Practice Collection because, over the years,it has become a uniquely sustained, comprehensive andresults-driven eort to protect and empower women, youthand children. It helps raise their own and public awareness o their human rights, including their sexual and reproductiverights, and it provides them with a range o services and mech-anisms that allow them to take advantage o those rights.PROSAD ocuses on two o the country’s thirteen regions, Estand Sud-Ouest. It is scheduled to last until the end o 2015and has three components:
Component One
ocuses on youth and their needs orinormation and services in the areas o amily planning,sexual and reproductive health, and prevention, care andtreatment or HIV inection.
Component wo
ocuses on women and girls and their needsor inormation about their basic rights and or mechanismsthey can turn to when their rights are violated. It pays particularattention to stopping emale genital mutilation (FGM) andto enrolling and retaining girls in school.
Component Tree
ocuses on children and their needs orprotection rom child tracking and the worst orms o childlabour.
Methods
Strategic inormation:
PROSAD is committed to “managingor results.” It strives to provide all the timely and accurateinormation needed or eective planning, implementation andmonitoring and evaluation. Its outputs include monthly,quarterly and annual statistical reports and it also pays closeattention to needs or qualitative inormation, collectedthrough interviews, ocus groups discussions and community meetings. Tis inormation is enriched by its strong commit-ment to action at the local level, where a range o peoplecontribute their own knowledge and experience o community traditions, customs, attitudes and practices.
Capacity development:
PROSAD works with eight ministries(or health, welare, education, women’s rights, labour, etc.),the National Committee against Excision and the NationalCouncil against AIDS to build the capacity o their regional,provincial and local branches and to orge partnerships with and build the capacity o NGOs, village councils andothers. Results include teams o trained proessionals andvolunteers in health and social services plus provincial andvillage committees that share responsibility or raising people’sawareness and intervening when, or example, a woman’srights are violated or a child is tracked.
Behaviour change communications:
PROSAD places heavy emphasis on developing and supporting the use o a rangeo highly interactive approaches to behaviour change commu-nications (BCC). Some (e.g., peer education, lay and proes-sional counselling) will be amiliar to most readers. wo (orumtheatre presentations, animations using the GRAAP method) were developed in Burkina Faso and have been used by many other programmes but adapted to PROSAD’s purposes.wo (school courses on FGM, Approche Famille) have beendeveloped with the support o PROSAD and other Germanpartners. Te our less amiliar BCC approaches are describedin the ollowing sections.
Forum theatre presentations
Forum theatre was pioneered by a proessional theatre company, Atelier Téâtre Burkinabè, and the Fédération NationaleTéâtre Forum, an association consisting largely o local groupso amateur actors. PROSAD supports them as they produceplays designed to address the issues covered by all three o its components. Sometimes there are opportunities or audienceparticipation in the plays and, always, there are opportunities
Grade ve and six students look at an illustration while their teacher explains how excision can do serious harm.
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or discussion and debate immediately aterwards. Te playsare oten perormed in schools, with school children playingsome o the roles and with issue-oriented games and discussionsaterwards. In Sud-Ouest, PROSAD supports annual culturalestivals that provide additional opportunities or orum theatrepresentations and other events. School children are among themany enthusiastic organizers and participants.
Animations using the GRAAP method
For decades, the Burkina-based Groupe de Recherche etd’Appui pour l’Autopromotion Paysanne (GRAAP) has beendeveloping and rening the “GRAAP method” o animationsto support community sel-development. GRAAP and theCentres d’Etudes Economiques et Sociales d’Arique Occiden-tale (CESAO) collaborate on providing training to localanimators. PROSAD has collaborated with both to developmaterial and provide training or animations that engagepeople in thinking about child tracking and the worst ormso child labour. Te method makes use o cartoons encasedin plastic that adhere to a “fannel,” a special cloth that can bepinned to a wall or hung over a board. An animator asksquestions and, as the audience answers, the animator pinscartoons illustrating the answers to the fannel until the whole story is told o the causes, consequences and solutions.Te idea is to take participants through three steps: to see,to refect and to act. Tese animations are now conductedin a wide range o venues, rom schools to gold miningcamps, and help to promote a code o conduct or employersdeveloped with PROSAD’s support.
School courses against FGM
PROSAD’s point o departure or addressing FGM has been aschool-based approach launched by an earlier German-support-ed programme in 2000. Developed in collaboration withthe ministries o primary and secondary education, the approachuses two sets o age-appropriate course material. In primary schools, or example, teachers ask children questions aboutFGM and write the answers in columns on the black-board,being careul not to let their own opinions be known. Whenthe children have run out o answers, the teachers ask themto divide into two groups according to whether they are oragainst FGM. Te two groups ormulate their arguments oror against and then engage in debate. Ater the debate, theteachers provide the students with accurate inormation aboutFGM and then ask them to divide into two groups again soeveryone can see how many have been persuaded to changetheir minds and those who have not changed their minds canexplain why.
Approche Famille
 A Burkinabe amily is the primary vehicle or socializing itsmembers and it is their rst and last reuge in times o trouble.PROSAD has worked with the ministries responsible or women and social action to develop a BCC model that usesthe amily unit as the setting or education and dialogueaimed at promoting women’s rights and putting an end toFGM and violence against women. PROSAD is currently supporting collaboration between the two ministries and twocommunity-based organizations to test and rene this model.Tis involves training community members as animatorscapable o introducing one o three topics (women’s rights,violence against women and FGM) at a particular amily session, playing a 15-minute tape on that topic and thenanimating discussion. Te aim is to help amily members o both genders and all ages identiy where there is confict inthe amily now or potential or confict in the uture and tond ways o calming or avoiding the confict. PROSADalso supports reerral systems and mechanisms or resolvingproblems that cannot be resolved by amilies themselves.
 A cartoon posted during an animation shows a PROSAD-supported village committeemeeting to consider what to do about a reported case o child tracking.
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