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1900-Published Indian Cookery Book for Europeans

1900-Published Indian Cookery Book for Europeans

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Published by Skelmorlie
RICE OR CHOWL - KITCHEEREES - PELLOW OR POOLOO - CURRIES - GRAVY CURRIES - DOOPIAJAS - FORCEMEAT BALL CURRIES, OR COFTA-KA-CARREE - COUNTRY CAPTAIN - HINDOOSTANEE CURRIES - HUSSANEE CURRIES, OR CURRIES ON STICK - KURMA OR QUOREMA CURRY - MALAY CURRIES - PORTUGUESE CURRY (VINDALOO OR BINDALOO) - MADRAS MULLIGATAWNY CURRY - CHAHKEES - SAUG CURRIES - BHAHJEES - DAL OR PEAS CURRIES - BURTAS OR MASHES - SOUPS - FISH - JOINTS, MADE DISHES, ETC. - VEGETABLES - PASTRY, PUDDINGS, SWEETMEATS, ETC. - GARNISHES, SAUCES, STUFFINGS, ETC. - INDIAN PICKLES, CHUTNEES, SAUCES, ETC. - INDIAN PRESERVES, JAMS, JELLIES, AND MARMALADES - HOME-MADE LIQUEURS - MEDICINAL AND OTHER RECIPES - PERFUMERY, COSMETICS AND DENTIFRICE - MISCELLANEOUS USEFUL RECIPES - THINGS WORTH KNOWING
RICE OR CHOWL - KITCHEEREES - PELLOW OR POOLOO - CURRIES - GRAVY CURRIES - DOOPIAJAS - FORCEMEAT BALL CURRIES, OR COFTA-KA-CARREE - COUNTRY CAPTAIN - HINDOOSTANEE CURRIES - HUSSANEE CURRIES, OR CURRIES ON STICK - KURMA OR QUOREMA CURRY - MALAY CURRIES - PORTUGUESE CURRY (VINDALOO OR BINDALOO) - MADRAS MULLIGATAWNY CURRY - CHAHKEES - SAUG CURRIES - BHAHJEES - DAL OR PEAS CURRIES - BURTAS OR MASHES - SOUPS - FISH - JOINTS, MADE DISHES, ETC. - VEGETABLES - PASTRY, PUDDINGS, SWEETMEATS, ETC. - GARNISHES, SAUCES, STUFFINGS, ETC. - INDIAN PICKLES, CHUTNEES, SAUCES, ETC. - INDIAN PRESERVES, JAMS, JELLIES, AND MARMALADES - HOME-MADE LIQUEURS - MEDICINAL AND OTHER RECIPES - PERFUMERY, COSMETICS AND DENTIFRICE - MISCELLANEOUS USEFUL RECIPES - THINGS WORTH KNOWING

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Categories:Types, Recipes/Menus
Published by: Skelmorlie on Jan 29, 2010
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THE INDIAN COOKERY BOOK 
ANONYMOUS
PUBLISHED BY THACKER, SPINK & CO., CALCUTTA
circa. 1900RICE OR CHOWL - KITCHEEREES - PELLOW OR POOLOO - CURRIES - GRAVY CURRIES - DOOPIAJAS - FORCEMEAT BALL CURRIES, OR COFTA-KA-CARREE -COUNTRY CAPTAIN - HINDOOSTANEE CURRIES - HUSSANEE CURRIES, ORCURRIES ON STICK - KURMA OR QUOREMA CURRY - MALAY CURRIES -PORTUGUESE CURRY (VINDALOO OR BINDALOO) - MADRAS MULLIGATAWNY CURR- CHAHKEES - SAUG CURRIES - BHAHJEES - DAL OR PEAS CURRIES - BURTAS ORMASHES - SOUPS - FISH - JOINTS, MADE DISHES, ETC. - VEGETABLES - PASTRY,PUDDINGS, SWEETMEATS, ETC. - GARNISHES, SAUCES, STUFFINGS, ETC., - INDIANPICKLES, CHUTNEES, SAUCES, ETC. - INDIAN PRESERVES, JAMS, JELLIES, ANDMARMALADES - HOME-MADE LIQUEURS - MEDICINAL AND OTHER RECIPES -PERFUMERY, COSMETICS AND DENTIFRICE - MISCELLANEOUS USEFUL RECIPES -THINGS WORTH KNOWINGNote on Indian Measures
-1 chittack=2 ounces-1 seer = 2 lb
RICE OR CHOWL
Rice is consumed by most European families at breakfast, tiffin, and dinner. It is eaten atbreakfast with fried meat, fish, omelet, country captain, or some other curried dish, and, beinginvariably followed by toast and eggs, jams, fruit, &c., one /coonkee/, which contains about as1
 
much as an ordinary breakfast-cup, or say half a pound, will always be ample for four tolerablyhearty consumers. There are two sizes of /coonkees/, large and small: reference is here madeto the /small coonkee/, well filled. The quantity, however, of raw rice for a party of four shouldnot exceed half a pound. The rice at dinner is usually preceded by soup, fish, roast, and made dishes. The best or generally approved qualities of rice for table use are known as the bhaktoolsee,the banafool, the bassmuttee, and cheeneesuckur. In purchasing these, or indeed any otherapproved quality, care must be taken to avoid /new rice/ and what is called /urruah/, whichlatter has been put through some process of boiling, or damped, and then dried. Both areconsidered unwholesome for general daily consumption, and few Indians will use them.Good rice when rubbed in the palm of the hand, and cleared of dust, will appear of a brightand nearly transparent yellowish colour; whereas the /urruah/ will be found of a dull whitishhue, and the grain streaked and speckled with white powder, which crumbles on theapplication of a needle's point. The price of rice, like other commodities, varies according to its plenty or scarcity in themarket. After the cyclone of October, 1864, and again of November, 1867, the price of thebhaktoolsee and the banafool, which are fine, large, stout-grain rice, without being coarse,ruled at from eight to nine seers per rupee, and the bassmuttee and the cheeneesuckur atfrom seven to eight seers per rupee. The rice used by the poorest classes of the nativepopulation is of a very coarse description and incredibly cheap: within six weeks after thecyclone of November, 1867, it was readily procurable at twenty-five to thirty seers per rupee.Rice is used in a variety of forms: it is boiled, made into kitcheeree, pellow, puddings, blancmange, cakes, bread, &c. The bhaktoolsee, the banafool, and other stout-grain rice are the best adapted for boiling.Boiled rice is called /bhath/. The bassmuttee, cheeneesuckur, and all small and fine-grain rice are selected for kitcheeree,pellow, and puddings for children's food, and for invalids. The /urruah/ is used in some houses in ignorance, but for the most part it is made into flour,and used for blanc mange, cakes, &c. The flour is abundantly procurable in the Calcuttamarkets, and is largely used by all native bakers in the making of bread. Twenty-two to twenty-five seers of rice monthly, consuming it three times a day,entertainments included, will be ample for a party of four, allowing occasionally for a ricepudding.It is necessary to wash rice thoroughly in several waters before using it, and a colander is veryuseful for draining away the water after washing the rice.
1Boiled Rice
Wash half a pound or a coonkeeful of rice, and put it to boil in a large quantity of water, over abrisk fire. Immediately the rice begins to boil, the water will bubble up to the surface of the potand overflow, carrying away quantities of scum and impurities. The cover of the pot shouldnow be kept partially open, and the rice stirred to prevent an entire overflow of the water. Onthe subsiding of the water or the bubbling, the fire should be reduced, until it is satisfactorilyascertained that the grains of rice, without being pappy, are quite soft, when the pot should be2
 
removed from the fire and a quart of cold water be added. All the liquid, which is "conjee,"should then be drained, and the pot replaced over a gentle charcoal heat, to allow all moistureto evaporate, assisting the process by occasionally shaking the pot, or stirring its contentsgently with a wooden spoon. Time to boil: half an hour. The coonkee of rice when properly boiled will fill a good-sized curry or vegetable dish. The ricewill be found quite soft, and yet every grain perfectly separate. Rice should never be cookedinto a pap, excepting it is required for very young children; and leaving the grains hard oruncooked should be equally avoided.A small pinch of pounded alum or /fitkerree/ is used by some cooks with advantage to improvethe whiteness of boiled rice.
2Rice Conjee
 The water in which rice is boiled should never be thrown away: it is nutritious and fattening forall cattle, horses included,and may be given daily to milch cows and goats with great advantage.
3Rice Kheer
 This is occasionally served upon the breakfast-table as a treat, but few Europeans care for it. Itis made as follows:--Thoroughly boil one coonkee or half a pound of the bassmuttee or thecheeneesuckur rice, then drain the water away, add two cups of pure cow's milk, and put overa slow fire. As the rice begins to absorb the milk, two or three small sticks of cinnamon are putin, with one tablespoonful and a half to two tablespoonfuls of fine-quality white sugar. On themilk beingentirely absorbed, the kheer is either turned out upon a dish and eaten hot, or put into abuttered mould, served up in shape, and eaten cold.Kheer is sometimes cooked or boiled in milk only, but the foregoing recipe is supposed to bethat more generally approved.
4Pish - Pash
Pick and wash in several waters a coonkee or half a pound of the bassmuttee or other fine-grain rice; add to it, cleaned and cut up, a chicken, some sliced ginger, sliced onions, a fewbay-leaves, some peppercorns, a few hotspice, a dessertspoonful of salt, one chittack or twoounces of butter, and water sufficient to cover the whole. Simmer over a slow fire until thechicken becomes perfectly tender and the rice quite pappy. Serve up hot. This is considered amost excellent and nutritious meal for invalids.
KITCHEEREES
 These are occasionally substituted for boiled rice at breakfast, and are eaten with fried fish,omelets, croquets, jhal frezee, &c. They are prepared as follows:--
5Bhoonee Kitcheeree
 Take rather more than three-quarters of a coonkee of bassmuttee or cheeneesuckur and half acoonkee of dal; or, if preferred, take the rice and dal in equal parts. Take twelve large curry onions and cut them up lengthways into fine slices. Warm up twochittacks or four ounces of ghee (but before doing so be careful to warm the pot), and, while3

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