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Islamophobia and Anti-Muslim Hate Crime - Jonathan Githens-Mazer and Robert Lambert

Islamophobia and Anti-Muslim Hate Crime - Jonathan Githens-Mazer and Robert Lambert

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Published by: Political Islamism on Jan 30, 2010
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Islamophobia and Anti-Muslim Hate Crime:a London Case Study
DR JONATHAN GITHENS-MAZER AND DR ROBERT LAMBERT MBEEUROPEAN MUSLIM RESEARCH CENTRE
Islamoonda L
 R JONA 
hobia and Anti-n Case Study
HAN GITHENS-MAZE
Muslim Hate C
R AND DR ROBERT L
rime:
MBERT MBEEUROPEA MUSLIM RESEARCH CENTRE
 
EUROPEAN MUSLIM RESEARCH CENTRE
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Contents
 About the authors3 About the EMRC4Dedication5Foreword6Preface 7 Acknowledgements 9 Abbreviations10Executive Summary11Research methodology14Terminology17
Research findings
1Introduction182Serious anti-Muslim hate crimes 202.1.Significance of David Copeland case and Stephen Lawrence Inquiry202.2.Neil Lewington: extremist nationalist convicted of bomb plot232.3.Terence Gavan: extremist nationalist convicted of manufacturing nail bombs 252.4.Gang attack on Muslim students at City University262.5.Gang attack on Yasir Abdelmouttalib322.6.Murder of Ikram Syed ul-Haq342.7.Serious assault on Imam at London Central Mosque362.8.Arson attack on Greenwich Islamic Centre373. Low level street assaults, abuse and intimidation of Muslims383.1.Death threats and threats of harm403.2.Unreported anti-Muslim hate-crimes413.3.Impact of British National Party424.Conclusion: Londonersresilience and good citizenship43 Appendix: Islamophobia: Islamophobic Hate Crime by Tim Parsons45Bibliography48
 
 Jonathan Githens-Mazer and Robert Lambert becameresearch partners in October 2007. Since then and prior to this current project they have conducted numerousinterviews with Muslim Londoners, especially those withfamily backgrounds in North Africa. This earlier researchproject sought to understand how myths, memories andsymbols of the past affected contemporary forms of politicalactivism – literally how stories that grandparents tell grandchildren about the colonial past make a difference to worldviews and the politics of the ‘street’. What began as aproject to chart how these stories created a basis for  violence, through radicalisation, rapidly became a study thatexamined how colonial and contemporary politicalrepression reverberated through European North Africancommunities today. It became apparent that thesecommunities chafed at the popular use of terms such as‘radicalisation’, believing that they unfairly stigmatisedMuslims who feel an obligation to become politically activein the present to prevent what they perceive as the horrorsof the past recurring today.
These research observations suggested that the popular andpejorative notions of politically active Muslim Londoners assubversive and sectarian threats did not match the reality on theground. Instead, according to our research, the small number of Muslim Londoners who in the last decade could be accuratelydescribed as threats to the well being of the city – perhaps AbuHamza a former Khatib at the North London Central Mosque is the most well known figure in this category – had beeneffectively challenged by the very same Muslim Londoners whohad most often been wrongly conflated with them. The authorsrapidly concluded that this was not only grossly unfair, but alsoliable to be tangibly counter-productive in terms of London’ssecurity and the enhancement of community cohesion. For thisreason they have argued that the UK government’s strategy toprevent violent extremism has at times been undermined byadvisors, most notably the Quilliam Foundation, who targetmainstream London-based Muslim organisations as subversive threats when the evidence suggests they are often credible andeffective opponents of violent extremism (Githens-Mazer andLambert, 2009a,b,c and d).Both authors have personal experience of the power andeffectiveness of cross-cultural alliances against bigotry, in one casein support of disadvantaged and alienated black citizens inBaltimore and the other in support of disadvantaged andalienated Muslim citizens in London. It is not surprising therefore that their partnership should be characterised by a notion of empowering marginalised and disadvantaged communities. Thisreport represents the beginning of a research project that isplanned to investigate the adverse community impact of Islamophobia and anti-Muslim hate crime across Europe over a ten year period. The authors are determined to influencegovernment, media, police, public servants and public attitudesand thereby contribute to solutions to the problem before itescalates further. In doing so they will maintain a daily presence inLondon, their research hub, in support of which the Universityof Exeter Streatham campus provides an ideal location for supportive reflection and analysis.
 About the Authors
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vikingo43 liked this
John Creme added this note
A disgraceful piece of fascist propaganda disguised as scholarship. It even claims that 'Islamophobia' should be categorized as the belief that Western Values are superior to Islamic values. 'The Tyranny of Guilt' by Pascal Bruckner adequately explains the twisted self-hating mentality of two supposedly liberal men who seek to appease the most illiberal, intolerant force on the planet. Disgusting.
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