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The Last Orange on Earth: An activity to teach mindful eating

The Last Orange on Earth: An activity to teach mindful eating

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Why is mindful eating important? Orange Peel Bread.
Why is mindful eating important? Orange Peel Bread.

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Published by: University of Wyoming Extension on Feb 04, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/11/2014

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Deborah Johnson
, BS,Family and ConsumerScience Educator, NatronaCounty (retired)
Suzanne Pelican
, MS, RD,Food and NutritionSpecialist, Departmento Family and ConsumerSciences, University o Wyoming CooperativeExtension Service
An activity to teach mindful eating
Why is mindful eating important?Especially for educatorsLearner objectives
Experts agree that
what
we eat greatly aects our health. But what about
how
we eat? Do wethink about our ood while we eat it, or, too oten, do we eat while we drive, type on a keyboard,read a book, watch TV, or play a computer game? Based on research rom the WIN the Rock-ies project
1
, eating while doing something else increases the chances o a person gainingexcess weight
2
, but regardless o how much we weigh, this distracted or mindlesseating is an unhealthy habit. This handout describes an activity that can help educators teach adultsand youths – all o us – to become more mindul when we eat. Minduleating is an important part o having a healthy liestyle, and we need ahealthy liestyle to achieve a healthy weight
3
.
Universityof Wyoming
MP112-5
Cooperative Extension Service
As a result o this experience and taking timeto actively see, smell, eel, and taste an orangewhile they eat it, participants will
•Recognizetheimportanceoftaking
time to enjoy the ood they eat.
•Valuefoodasmorethansomethingto
ll them up.
•Appreciatethatanordinaryfood
can be uniquely satisying. These perspectives and skills can helppeople eat more mindully.I you have been looking or a way to teach otherpeople about mindul eating, this activity is designedwith you in mind!
“Honor thegift of food.”
—Northwest Coast Indian proverb and WIN the Rockies
1
and WIN Wyoming
4
 principle
Cooperative Extension Service
 
What you will need
•Washedoranges,oneforeachparticipant.Iforangesare
too expensive, people can share.
•Papertowelsornapkins.•Paringknifeforeachparticipant.
Note
: I working withyouths, sturdy plastic knives may be more appropriate.
Participant steps – 
Guidance to give your participants
1. Wash your hands.2. Admire the color, shape, and t
 
exture o the ruit.3. Oranges grow on trees in warm climates. Close your eyes and imagine where yourorange grew.
Can you eel the warm sun? Can you smell the blossoms? Can yousee the ruit on the trees? 
4. Open your eyes and smell the orange.
5.Placetheorangeonanapkinorpieceofpapertowel.Rolltheorangermlyonthe
table to release the orange essence.
6.Pickuptheorangeagainandsmelltheessence.
7. Use the knie to make several cuts, just through the peel. Create quarters by rstcutting around the ruit and then cutting rom top to bottom.
Note
: I workingwith youths, it may be best to have an adult or older youth make these cuts.8. Take time to smell the orange again.
Does it smell stronger? Sweeter? 
9.Peelthefruitslowly,takingtimetoenjoythearoma,texture,andcolor.
10. Separate a couple o segments. Examine their inner structure – hundreds o tiny juice-lled sacs.
11.Placeasegmentinyourmouth,closeyoureyes,andbitedown.Payattentionto
how the juice bursts into your mouth and lls it with orange favor.12. Chew slowly and experience the texture o the membrane.
How is this dierent than drinking a glass o orange juice? 
13. As you chew slowly, pretend this is the last orange on earth. It’s all yours!
 
Food for thought – 
 
west to the Mediterranean, whereorange trees spread across North
AfricaintoSpainandPortugal.
Columbus carried seeds o orangeand lemon trees to the West Indies.
Oranges today 
Brazilistheleadingorange-produc
-ing country in the world, ollowedby the United States, Mexico, Spain,Italy, China, Egypt, Turkey, Morocco,and Greece.Florida and Caliornia are the lead-ing orange-producing states in theUnited States. These two statesproduce nearly 25
billion
pounds o oranges each year! There are many ways to say “orange,”or example: In Dutch –
sinasappel 
 (
see
-nohs-ap-pel); Italian –
arancia
 (ah-
rahn
-chah); Spanish –
naranjo
 (nah-
rahn
-ho); German –
orange
 (oh-
rong
-je).
 
“I like this activity.Oranges are so muchmore than a rich sourceo vitamin C: The spray that can zing you when you peel it, the essenceo orange and the ‘resh’ that flls your nose, the juice that covers your fngers as you peel it. . . .” 
 - Judy Barbe, registereddietitian, Western DairyCouncilWas the orange satisying? Why orwhy not?Do you usually eat an orange in thisway?What would happen i you ate oodthis way more oten?How oten do you eat because youare hungry or ood? How much isto ll a need that has nothing to dowith ood?Imagine your orange really is thelast one on earth, and it’s your jobto keep the memory o the orangerom being lost rom the world. Think about what you would say toanother person. How would youdescribe the experience so he/shecould appreciate an orange?
Questions to ask participants to guide discussionand convey other important meanings
Fruit facts
5
Did you know . . . ? 
Botanically speaking, the orange wecommonly eat or make into juice is
Citrus sinesis
. The bitter orange, alsocalled Seville, is a dierent species.
Orangevarietiesincludenavel,Pera,
Valencia, Hamlin, Moro, and Jaa.Orange trees are evergreens that canproduce leaves, fowers, and ruit allat the same time.In addition to being rereshing anddelicious, oranges are packed witholate, vitamin C, potassium, ber,and substances called phytochemi-cals, which help prevent disease.
History and geography 
Oranges may have rst grown inChina 4,000 years ago.About 2,000 years ago, oranges be-gan to spread beyond China, prob-ably rst to India. They expanded

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