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Edmonds Intro Daphnis & Chloe Scribd 00208 Large-Print

Edmonds Intro Daphnis & Chloe Scribd 00208 Large-Print

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Page 1 of 18 - J. M. Edmonds’ Introduction to Longus’ Daphnis and Chloe, Loeb Classical Library, 1916, pp. vii-xxiii

Introduction I. — Longus Nothing is known of the author of the Pastoralia. He describes Mytilene as if he knew it well, and he mentions the peculiarities of the Lesbian vine. He may have been a Lesbian, but such local colouring need not have been gathered on the spot, nor if so, by a native. His style and language are Graeco-Roman rather than Hellenistic; he probably knew Vergil'
Page 1 of 18 - J. M. Edmonds’ Introduction to Longus’ Daphnis and Chloe, Loeb Classical Library, 1916, pp. vii-xxiii

Introduction I. — Longus Nothing is known of the author of the Pastoralia. He describes Mytilene as if he knew it well, and he mentions the peculiarities of the Lesbian vine. He may have been a Lesbian, but such local colouring need not have been gathered on the spot, nor if so, by a native. His style and language are Graeco-Roman rather than Hellenistic; he probably knew Vergil'

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Page 1 of 18 - J. M. Edmonds’ Introduction to Longus’ Daphnisand Chloe, Loeb Classical Library, 1916, pp. vii-xxiii
IntroductionI. — LongusNothing is known of the author of the
Pastoralia
. Hedescribes Mytilene as if he knew it well, and he mentionsthe peculiarities of the Lesbian vine. He may have been aLesbian, but such local colouring need not have beengathered on the spot, nor if so, by a native. His style andlanguage are Graeco-Roman rather than Hellenistic; heprobably knew Vergil's
Bucolics
1
; like Strabo and Lucianhe writes in Greek and yet bears a Roman name. Till thediggers discover a dated papyrus-fragment, we can sayprovisionally that he may have written as early as thebeginning of the second century after Christ, probably notmuch later than the beginning of the third.Two of Longus' characters connect him, indirectly atleast, with the New Comedy, Gnatho the parasite, andSophrone the nurse who exposed the infant Daphnis.
2
Itis to be noted that he and Horace, some of whose namesare found like his in the New Comedy, are the only literaryusers of the name Chloë.
3
He knows and loves hisSappho; witness the crushed but still beautiful flowers in
 
Page 2 of 18 - J. M. Edmonds’ Introduction to Longus’ Daphnisand Chloe, Loeb Classical Library, 1916, pp. vii-xxiii
the ravaged garden, and the lovely apple left by thegatherers upon the topmost bough.
4
To Theocritus heplainly owes more than the locust-cage and the nameClearista.
5
Not only has he numerous verbal imitations of Theocritus, but the whole atmosphere of the book is, in asense, Theocritean. And there are passages reminiscentof the other Bucolic poets.
6
In one place Longus definitelyconnects his rustic characters with the herdsmen of Bucolic poetry. When Lamo tells the Story of the Pipe, weare told that he had it from a Sicilian goatherd. And it ishardly going too far, perhaps, to see a similar intention inthe name he gives to the old herdsman Philetas, who issecond only to Pan in playing the pipe, and who tellsDaphnis and Chloe the nature of love. For Philetas or Philitas was the father of Hellenistic poetry, the great manwho taught the elegiac love-poet Hermesianax and thepastoral, epic, and lyric love-poet Theocritus, and washimself, perhaps, the first writer of love-tales in elegiacverse.This is the only Greek prose-romance we havewhich is purely pastoral, and the inclusion of this feature inits title may show that in this respect it was a newdeparture. It is by far the best of the extant romances.Rohde
7
saw the fore-runners of the prose-romance in two
 
Page 3 of 18 - J. M. Edmonds’ Introduction to Longus’ Daphnisand Chloe, Loeb Classical Library, 1916, pp. vii-xxiii
kinds of literature. The first is the erotic tale of the elegiacwriters of the Hellenistic age, dealing with the loves of mythical personages. These poems formed the materialof such works as Ovid's
Metamorphoses
. Three of Longus' names, Astylus, Dryas, and Nape, are the namesof mythical personages in Ovid. The second literaryancestor Rohde believed to be the traveller's tale, such asthe
Indica
of Ctesias, a type parodied by Lucian in the
True History 
and not unconnected with the Utopias of  Aristophanes, Plato, and others. A trace of this ancestrysurvives perhaps in the title of this book "The
Lesbian
 Pastorals of Daphnis and Chloe."
8
 It is now generally thought that Rohde' s pedigreehardly accounts for all the facts.
9
In Chariton's
Story of Chaereas and Callirrhoe
, of which the date cannot bemuch later than 150 A.D. and may be a century earlier,the heroine is the daughter of Hermocrates, theSyracusan general of whom we read in Thucydides. The
Romance of Ninus
, of which a few pages have been foundin Egypt, and which was probably written in the lastcentury before Christ, is in all probability the love-story of the famous Semiramis and Ninus the founder of Nineveh.The author of the Ninus-romance takes two historicalpersonages and weaves a story — not the traditional story

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