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Published by: self on Aug 30, 2007
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06/16/2009

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Interviews Resources Previews Reviews Tutorials
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 A A Annnuuuhhh
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2 |PageJuly, 2007http://markup.gmking.org 
EDITORSDESK
 
Contributors This Issue
Robin Monks EditorEyas Sharaiha EditorAndris Belinskis EditorLeif Greenman WriterRhys Andrews WriterJosé Méndez WriterPhilip Gamble WriterGregory WriterBart Teunis WriterSean Flanagan WriterJake WriterStephan WriterDan Meinzer Writer &Graphic Designer
Table of Contents
 
Editorials
Future-proofing............................... 2Clone Games .................................... 6Make your code easier to read ....... 10Promoting your game to the GMC .. 20
Tutorials
Particle Effects Tutorial.................... 3Real time blur.................................. 7Cartesian and Polar Coordinates...... 9Binary for Beginners ....................... 11Coding Styles ................................. 14Modulo in Computer Science......... 15Smooth Online Movement ............. 17Introduction to Making DLLs.......... 19Level Editors.................................. 22GMPhysics..................................... 25Graphic Design ............................... 31Sound Effects: How Far?................ 32
Reviews
Textbar Maker............................... 14 _FATAL_ ......................................... 33Bounce 2 ........................................ 34Snow Ball War ................................ 35
Monthly Specials
Extension of the Month.................. 29Script of the Month........................ 30
MarkUp is a
 publication;please visit GMking for more free gamedevelopment resources!
 
Photo © 2007 Robin Monks
Future-proofing
 How can you ensure your creation willbe around 10 years down the road and
still
 
be enjoyed? That’s the topic forthis month’s
Editor’s Desk 
.This month was a bit different, as youprobably guessed by the late releasedate, mainly I headed off on a twomonth vacation and passed the magonto Eyas, who then left for vacationand passed it onto Andris, who then
left. Long story short I’m finishing the
mag on my vacation time
. We shouldbe back on track for next issue, justkeep those articles coming in!But, heading back to the original
question, how can you “future
-
proof”
your game and have it available for
years to come? It’s a tough job, and it
has to start way back in the planningstage with you subject matter andtarget audience. Does your audienceneed knowledge of a current event (e.g.a sporting event?). Is the subject mattertime-specific? This will limit theenjoyable life of your creation.There is also the development side;your choice of programming languageand development environment willaffect the about of time the game willremain operable. Game Maker has agood record here, with a game made inGM v6 being playable on Windows 98 toWindows Vista, a time frame of 10years.But, what can you do if you make agame, and there isn
t a great interest init, or you are no longer able to maintainit? How can you keep the gameprogressing? Open Source it! Release itunder a license like the GPL or CreativeCommons and let other continue tolearn from it and improve upon it. Yourwork lives on!Not to mention open sourcing yourwork under one of the aforementionedlicenses from the get go will allow youto get contributions and patches fromfellow game developers, and can alsoopen up the opportunity for you to usecode and resources from other opensource games in yours.Another way to keep your game livingon is to have it hosted on many sites, soas sites begin to die out you
ll still haveyour game hosted elsewhere, andpeople will still have the opportunityto download it.Keep up the games! I
ll see younext month (hopefully
).Robin Monks,Editor
 
3 |PageJuly, 2007http://markup.gmking.org 
GAME EFFECTS
 
Particle Effects Tutorial
 
Introduction
Particle Effects are one of the most wellknown visual/special effect methodsused in GML, and in many otherlanguages as well. Particles are variousshapes (and sizes), with very littleinformation. This information includes
where they’re supposed to go, their
appearance, and more. With such littleinformation, particles take little CPUusage to calculate where and how todraw them on the screen. This is whyparticles are a great method to use if you want effects such as rain,explosions, smoke, fireworks, flames,and more. In the
GameCave EffectsEngine
, many engines are created onparticles alone (and sometimes withsome non-particle effects attached).Unfortunately, Particle Systems/effectscan take some time to get the hang of.They also take a lot of trial and error,and patience to get individual particletypes the way you want them.Inside a particle system are two types of elements.
Particle Types
, which are theparticles themselves
 –
what they looklike, how they move, how they live/die,etc. Particle types are actually not a partof any system, and can be used by anysystem
 –
however, for the sake of simplicity I like to think of particle typesas part of a system. The other type is
 filters
. Filters manipulate and changethe life of the particle as it is displayedon the screen. The most commonly usedfilter is an emitter. Emitters create theparticles in certain regions of a room.Other filters include attractors (whichdraw particles to a certain position withan amount of force), destroyers (whichdestroys particles that comewithin aregion in the room),deflectors (which bouncesparticles off an invisible force), andchangers (which change particles intoother types of particles when theycollide with an invisible region/force). Inthis tutorial, only the emitter filter willbe explained in detail.
Creating systems, filters,and types
A game can have as many systems,filters, and particle types as you like. Of course, the more you have, the morememory they take up. To create one of these, all you must do is use thefollowing functions:
system0 =part_system_create();
 //Create a System
emitter =part_emitter_create(system0);
 //Create an emitter in the system'system0'
attractor =part_attractor_create(system0);
 //Create an attractor in the system'system0'
destroyer =part_destroyer_create(system0);
 //Create a destroyer in the system'system0'
changer =part_changer_create(system0);
 //Create a changer in the system'system0'
particle0 =part_type_create();
 //Create a particle type.
If you do not assign these functions to avariable, the system is still createdhowever you will not be able to access itbecause the unique ID of the system,filter, or type was not saved to anythingyou can refer to. Remember, if youcreate a second system and assign it to
the same ‘system0’ variable, the old
system will technically be lost and youwill not be able to do anything with thesystem.
GAME EFFECTS
 
 

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