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A Peculiar People: Faithfulness in Covenant Practices Among Groups that Form Missional Orders

A Peculiar People: Faithfulness in Covenant Practices Among Groups that Form Missional Orders

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Published by lenhjalmarson
Culture is a cultivating force. The agrarian metaphor reminds us that we are like plants and the soil we root in shapes us. Our imaginations in the west are more formed by our market culture than by biblical values, and thus we tend to think and act as autonomous individuals. We become consumers of religious goods and services. In view of the shaping power of culture, how will the Christian movement survive as an alternative society? It is the view of this writer that the church is meant to be an alternative and kingdom culture, with its own forming and sustaining practices. The renewal movements that spring up on the margins of the church show us the way forward. This project mines the new monastic movement and missional orders for data to support the hypothesis that alternative practices root an alternative culture, sustaining a vital and missional spirituality.
Culture is a cultivating force. The agrarian metaphor reminds us that we are like plants and the soil we root in shapes us. Our imaginations in the west are more formed by our market culture than by biblical values, and thus we tend to think and act as autonomous individuals. We become consumers of religious goods and services. In view of the shaping power of culture, how will the Christian movement survive as an alternative society? It is the view of this writer that the church is meant to be an alternative and kingdom culture, with its own forming and sustaining practices. The renewal movements that spring up on the margins of the church show us the way forward. This project mines the new monastic movement and missional orders for data to support the hypothesis that alternative practices root an alternative culture, sustaining a vital and missional spirituality.

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Published by: lenhjalmarson on Feb 12, 2010
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04/03/2013

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ACTS SEMINARIESTRINITY WESTERN UNIVERSITYA PECULIAR PEOPLE: FAITHFULNESS IN COVENANT PRACTICESAMONG GROUPS THAT FORM MISSIONAL ORDERSBYLEONARD E. HJALMARSONA DISSERTATION SUBMITTED TO THE FACULTYOF ACTS SEMINARIESIN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OFTHE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREEDOCTOR OF MINISTRYLANGLEY, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADAAPRIL, 2009
 
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ABSTRACT
Culture is a cultivating force. The agrarian metaphor reminds us that we are likeplants and the soil we root in shapes us. Our imaginations in the west are more formed by ourmarket culture than by biblical values, and thus we tend to think and act as autonomousindividuals. We become consumers of religious goods and services. In view of the shapingpower of culture, how will the Christian movement survive as an alternative society? It is theview of this writer that the church is meant to be an alternative and kingdom culture, with itsown forming and sustaining practices. The renewal movements that spring up on the marginsof the church show us the way forward. This project mines the new monastic movement andmissional orders for data to support the hypothesis that alternative practices root analternative culture, sustaining a vital and missional spirituality.
 
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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
A dissertation might be a “dissert” at the end of a long and nourishing meal. It wasthis and more. Thanks to a fairly rigorous process at the front end it never quite grew out of control, although the rabbit trails along the way were enticing.Thanks to the staff and faculty of ACTS Seminaries in Langley, BC for theirencouragement and care. Thanks to many conversation partners, local and abroad. Inparticular, thanks to Roland Kuhl, my advisor, Roger Helland, friend and co-conspirator,David Fitch, professor, blogger and pastor. Many other friends and mentors could be listedhere, but in particular I want to note Paul Fromont of Prodigal Kiwis, a partner in reflectionand pilgrimage, Walter Brueggemann, Old Testament scholar and prophet, Jean Vanier,fellow Canadian and founder of the L’Arche communities, and Alan Roxburgh, a determinedmissional thinker whose work on leadership and transition have helped me understand myown vocation more accurately.Other local friends, particularly those from the Manteo table or the Kelowna theologycafé, have been good conversation partners and have often sharpened my thinking. PaulMartinson, Mike McLoughlin, Stanley Biggs, Nick Fenn, Matt Duffy, Lorne Friesen, ChrisMcGrath, Laurence East. Trans-local conversation partners include those on the RESONATEmailing list: Jamie Arpin-Ricci, Scott Cripps, Norm Voth, George Werner, Frank Emanuel,Jordon Cooper, Leighton Tebay. I am inclined to list a few dead mentors as well, but perhapsa nod to Lesslie Newbigin is singularly important.Finally, John LaGrou and the Millennia foundation made my ongoing studiespossible. Thanks John for your friendship through this journey! My family have had toendure my nose pressed to more books than usual. Thanks to my gracious wife, Betty, andmy daughters Elise and Lauren. You often show me the face of Jesus.

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