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Duarte-Rosas v. Holinka et al - Document No. 3

Duarte-Rosas v. Holinka et al - Document No. 3

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Published by Justia.com
REPORT AND RECOMMENDATION re 2 MOTION for Leave to Proceed in forma pauperis filed by Isarael Duarte-Rosas be denied. 1 Petition for Writ of Habeas Corpus, filed by Isarael Duarte-Rosas be dismissed for lack of jurisdiction. Objections to R&R due by 9/7/2005. Signed by Magistrate Judge Susan R Nelson on 8/23/05. (VEM) 0:2005cv01856 Minnesota District Court
REPORT AND RECOMMENDATION re 2 MOTION for Leave to Proceed in forma pauperis filed by Isarael Duarte-Rosas be denied. 1 Petition for Writ of Habeas Corpus, filed by Isarael Duarte-Rosas be dismissed for lack of jurisdiction. Objections to R&R due by 9/7/2005. Signed by Magistrate Judge Susan R Nelson on 8/23/05. (VEM) 0:2005cv01856 Minnesota District Court

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Published by: Justia.com on Apr 29, 2008
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05/09/2014

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1Rule 4 provides that \u201c[i]f it plainly appears from the petition and any attached exhibits

that the petitioner is not entitled to relief in the district court, the judge must dismiss the petition and direct the clerk to notify the petitioner.\u201d Although The Rules Governing Section 2254 Cases are most directly applicable to habeas petitions filed by state prisoners pursuant to 28 U.S.C. \u00a7 2254, they also may be applied to habeas cases brought under 28 U.S.C. \u00a7 2241. Rule 1(b); Mickelson v. United States, Civil No. 01-1750 (JRT/SRN), (D.Minn. 2002), 2002 WL 31045849 at *2; Bostic v. Carlson, 884 F.2d 1267, 1270, n.1, (9th Cir. 1989); Rothstein v. Pavlick, No. 90 C 5558 (N.D.Ill. 1990), 1990 WL 171789 at *3.

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT
DISTRICT OF MINNESOTA
ISARAEL DUARTE-ROSAS,
Petitioner,
v.
HOLINKA, Warden, FCI-Waseca,
BOP, and
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
Respondents.
Civil No. 05-1856 (PAM/SRN)
REPORT AND
RECOMMENDATION

THIS MATTER is before the undersigned United States Magistrate Judge on Petitioner\u2019s application for habeas corpus relief under 28 U.S.C. \u00a7 2241. The case has been referred to this Court for report and recommendation pursuant to 28 U.S.C. \u00a7 636 and Local Rule 72.1. For the reasons discussed below, the Court will recommend that the petition for writ of habeas corpus be summarily dismissed pursuant to Rule 4 of The Rules Governing Section 2254 Cases In The United States District Courts.1

I.
BACKGROUND
In May 2003, Petitioner pleaded guilty to federal drug law violations in the United States
District Court for the District of Guam. He was sentenced to 97 months in federal prison, and
Case 0:05-cv-01856-PAM-SRN Document 3 Filed 08/23/2005 Page 1 of 9\ue000
Duarte-Rosas v. Holinka et al
Doc. 3
Dockets.Justia.com
2
he is presently serving his sentence at the Federal Correctional Institution in Waseca,
Minnesota. (Petition, [Docket No. 1], p. 2, \u00b6s 1-5.)

Petitioner did not challenge his conviction or sentence by direct appeal. (Id., \u00b6 7.) However, he later filed a motion in the trial court, under 28 U.S.C. \u00a7 2255, claiming that he had been \u201cconvicted of [a] non-existent offense.\u201d (Id., pp. 3-4, \u00b6s 10 and 11(a).) Petitioner\u2019s \u00a7 2255 motion was denied in July 2005, because (a) he had waived his right to challenge his conviction by pleading guilty, and (b) he had procedurally defaulted his claims by failing to raise them on direct appeal. (Id., \u00b6 11(b) and (c).) Petitioner apparently did not appeal the trial court\u2019s denial of his \u00a7 2255 motion.

Petitioner is now attempting to challenge his Guam conviction and sentence in a habeas corpus petition brought under 28 U.S.C. \u00a7 2241. He claims that the trial court lacked jurisdiction over his criminal case because there allegedly was \u201cno indictment in this case,\u201d and thus the trial court \u201cexceeded its jurisdiction &/or lost its jurisdiction of the offense.\u201d (Id., p. 3, \u00b6 9.)

For the reasons discussed below, the Court finds that Petitioner cannot raise his current claims for relief in a \u00a7 2241 habeas corpus petition. The Court will therefore recommend that this action be summarily dismissed for lack of jurisdiction.

II.
DISCUSSION

As a general rule, a federal prisoner can maintain a collateral challenge to his conviction or sentence only by filing a motion in the trial court pursuant to 28 U.S.C. \u00a7 2255. The fifth paragraph of \u00a7 2255 provides that

\u201c[a]n application for a writ of habeas corpus in behalf of a prisoner who is
Case 0:05-cv-01856-PAM-SRN Document 3 Filed 08/23/2005 Page 2 of 9\ue000
3

authorized to apply for relief by motion pursuant to this section [i.e., \u00a7 2255], shall not be entertained if it appears that the applicant has failed to apply for relief, by motion, to the court which sentenced him, or that such court has denied him relief, unless it also appears that the remedy by motion is inadequate or ineffective to test the legality of his detention.\u201d

In effect, a motion brought in the trial court under \u00a7 2255 is the exclusi ve remedy available to a federal prisoner who is asserting a collateral challenge to his conviction or sentence. See Hill v. Morrison, 349 F.3d 1089, 1091 (8th Cir. 2003) (\u201c[i]t is well settled a collateral challenge to a federal conviction or sentence must generally be raised in a motion to vacate filed in the sentencing court under \u00a7 2255... and not in a habeas petition filed in the court of incarceration... under \u00a7 2241"). No court other than the original trial court has jurisdiction to hear a post-conviction challenge to a prisoner\u2019s conviction or sentence, unless the prisoner has affirmatively demonstrated that the remedy provided by section 2255 \u201c\u2018is inadequate or ineffective to test the legality of...[his] detention.\u2019\u201d DeSimone v. Lacy, 805 F.2d 321, 323 (8th Cir. 1986)(per curiam), quoting 28 U.S.C. section 2255; see also, Von Ludwitz v. Ralston, 716 F.2d 528, 529 (8th Cir. 1983)(per curiam).

In this case, Petitioner is clearly trying to overturn his federal criminal conviction and
sentence. His present petition is therefore barred by \u00a7 2255\u2019s exclusive remedy rule.

In some cases, a \u00a7 2241 petition that is barred by the exclusive remedy rule can simply be construed as a motion brought under \u00a7 2255. The matter can then be transferred to the trial court judge so the prisoner\u2019s claims can be addressed on the merits there. In this case, however, Petitioner is precluded from seeking relief under \u00a7 2255, because he has already done so once before. Any \u00a7 2255 action that he might now attempt to pursue would have to be construed as a \u201csecond or successive\u201d application for relief, which, under the Anti-terrorism

Case 0:05-cv-01856-PAM-SRN Document 3 Filed 08/23/2005 Page 3 of 9\ue000

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