Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
17Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Freese - Vibrations of Vertical Pressure Vessels

Freese - Vibrations of Vertical Pressure Vessels

Ratings: (0)|Views: 332 |Likes:
Published by m5416

More info:

Published by: m5416 on Feb 17, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/28/2013

pdf

text

original

 
Vibrations of Vertical Pressure Vessels
C. E. FREESE
Mechanical Engineer, TheFluor Corporation, Ltd., LosAngeles, Calif. Mem. ASME
Introduction
For many years it was customary to apply guy wiresto tall ,slender pressure vessels. In, recent years, refinery andpetro-chemical officials have demanded self-supporting vesselsfrom the standpoint of plant appearance and safety.In order to design a self-supporting vessel of this type, thefollowing problems must be carefully analyzed:1 When it is necessary to deviate from the common practiceof designing a vertical vessel as a static structure and consider it asa dynamic structure?
Contributed by the Petroleum Division and presented at the ASMEPetroleum-Mechanical Engineering Conference, Denver, Colo., September21-24, 1958, of THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICALENGINEERS.NOTE: Statements and opinions advanced in papers are to beunderstood as individual expressions of their authors and not those of theSociety. Manuscript received at ASME Headquarters, July 9, 1958. PaperNo. 58 - PET-13.
Nomenclature
 f 
= lowest natural frequency of vibration,cycles per second
= = period of vibration, secg = acceleration due to gravity
= total weight of vessel or vessel sectionabove horizontal plane under construction, lb
S
= shear load at end of section, lb
w
= unit weight; lb/ftw' = weight of vessel element or internalpart, lb
 L
= total length, ft
l
=
length of element or section, ft
 D
= vessel diameter, ft
=
vessel diameter, in.
Journal of Engineering for Industry
This paper is primarily concerned with the vibration of vertical pressure vesselsknown as columns or towers
.
The procedure for estimating the period of first mode of vibration for columns whichare the same diameter and thickness for their entire length is outlined. A graph isincluded for this purpose which recommends limits between vessels considered to bestatic structures and those considered dynamic. A method for designing vessels considered as dynamic structures is described as wellas a detailed procedure for estimating the period of vibration of multithickness (steppeshell) vessels and/or vessels built to two or more diameters with conical transitions wherethe difference in diameter is small.There is a brief resume of the “Karman vortexes” effect and a discussion regardingvibration damping by liquid loading and the benefit of ladders and platforms which helpreduce the effect of periodic eddy shedding.The design procedure outlined will be useful to the practical vessel designer confronted with the task of investigating vibration possibilities in vertical pressurevessels.
2 What is the most practical method for designing to meetdynamic conditions?3 Does the method used produce consisten
results and does itprovide additional strength to resist the force due to the mass-acceleration resulting from the motion of the vessel ?4 Is the period of vibration of the dynamically designed vesselsuch that prevailing winds are not apt to cause excessivemovement?5 Are the external attachments ( such as piping, ladders, andplatforms) distributed all around the vessel to guard againstresonance due to eddy shedding in the “Karman vortex trail” atcritical wind velocities?These problems will be discussed during the outline of a designprocedure presented in this paper.Before proceeding, it should be pointed out that vesselvibrations induced by earthquakes are infrequent in occurrenceand this paper is more concerned with vibrations induced by windor other forces which may occur every day or many times duringthe day may depending upon the location.
= thickness of vessel shell, in
h
= = thickness of vessel shell, ft
 y
= deflection of element or section, ft
 y
 
= distance from e. g. of vessel element orinternal part (of weight
w
 
) to seam orhorizontal plane under consideration, ft
3
= seismic factor
 E' 
= 4320 X 10
6
= modulus of elasticity forsteel, Ib/ft
2
E = welded joint efficiency
 I =
moment of inertia of vessel shellcross-sectional area, ft
4
V =
velocity, ft/sec
k =
Strouhal number
= end slope of element in bending as acantilever beam, radian
4
(tan
=
)
P
= internal pressure, psigS = allowable stress of vessel material, psi
 M 
= moment about vessel seam orhorizontal plane under consideration, lb - ft
 M 
T =
moment at end of vessel sectionresulting from weight of sections to the rightsection under considerationC = corrosion allowanceR = Reynolds number
FEBRUARY 1959 / 77
1
 f 
12
 
8
3
 D
h
 
Design
It is customary for most vessel designers to establish theminimum vessel shell and trend thickness according to thepressure temperature conditions and then calculate the thicknessrequired at the bottom head seam due to bending momentsimposed by wind or earthquake forces [9].' Stresses in thelongitudinal direction are involved nod the following notation maybe used to summarize the thickness required:The terms within the absolute value signs are positive for tensilestresses and negative for compressive stresses. The first term givesthe thickness required for the longitudinal stress resulting frominternal pressure and is positive for pressures above atmosphericand negative for pressures below atmospheric. The second term isthe thickness required to resist the longitudinalbending stress andboth positive and negative values exist at the same time. The thirdterm is the thickness required for the weight of the vessel above theseam being investigated and, since this is a compressive stress, ithas a negative value. The combination giving the highest valueestablishes the thickness required to resist the longitudinal stresses.Consider equation (1) for a typical vessel operating at aninternally pressure greater than atmospheric:The required thickness within the absolute value signs will havetwo values; namely, +0.519 in. and -0.095 in. Therefore theminimum thickness required is 0.519 + 0.125 in. corrosionallowance = 0.644 in.Next consider equation (1) to appear as follows for the samevessel operating under vacuum conditions:For this case, the two values within the absolute value signs are-0.493 and + 0.121 in. resulting in a minimum thickness of 0.493+ 0.125 in. = 0.618 in.As previously stated, the moment M is the longitudinal bendingmoment due to wind or earthquake, either of which may becombined with eccentric loads imposed by mounting heavyequipment on the vessel. All designers are accustomed toevaluating moments due to eccentric and wind loads, but there area few who may not be familiar with the method used for estimatingmoments due to earthquake. Therefore, the following brief outlineis presented because this method is recommended as a designprocedure for vessels where dynamic considerations are required.The weight of each vessel element (shell, head, tray, or internalpart) is calculated. and then multiplied by the vertical distancefrom the circumferential seam (or horizontal plane) underconsideration to the center of gravity of the element. Thesummation of the moments so found ismultiplied by the seismicfactor for the area where the vessel is to operate, thereby yielding amoment due to earthquake or seismic disturbance. For vessels, theseismic factor will usually have avalue of 0.03 to 0.12, dependingupon the geographical location. Expressed mathematically,After the vessel has been designed in the regular manner(considered as a static structure) it should be investigated regardingits possible behavior under vibration conditions. If the vesselshell is of constant diameter and thickness for its full length, theperiod of vibration maybe easily found from the graph shown inFig. 1. This graph is plotted from the general formula for theperiod of the first mode of vibration of a cantilever beam [7]:For a steel cylindrical shell, equation (3) may be written:By rewriting equation (4) in the form:(3)(4)
1
Numbers in brackets designate References at end of paper
.
78 / FEBRUARY 1959
the variables (
 L/D
) and (
w
D/ 
h
) are usedas parameters to plot thegraph in Fig. 1.One of the first graphs of equation (4) was issued by a major oilcompany for their refinery work. In its original form, all vesselshaving a period of vibration over 0.4 sec were ordered designedas dynamic structures and those having a vibration period of 0.4sec or less were ordered designed as static structures. Experiencehas shown that a more practical limit for this division is a linedrawnfrom 0.4 sec at the extreme left of the graph to 0.8 sec at theextreme right and considering vessels having a period of vibrationabove this line to require dynamic consideration and those belowto require designing as a static structure. The reason for revisingthe former limit is the fact that many vessels having small (
 L/D
)ratios and large values of (
wD/h
) have given satisfactory servicealthough their period of vibration exceeded 0.4 sec. In general,vessels having an (
 L/D
) ratio less than 15 are not apt to be criticalfrom a vibration, standpoint. One exception to this statement,unofficially reported to the author, involved two vessels operatingnear a railroad whereby they were vibrated by railroad equipment
.
Both vessels had a period of vibration considerably less than 0.4sec and their frequency probably coincided with the frequency of the exciting force, thereby causing resonance. This type of response is difficult, if not impossible, to predict accurately andshould be considered as a special case.If investigation indicates that the vessel should be designed as adynamic structure, the method of seismic analogy isrecommended. This method consists of designing the vessel forearthquake conditions using a seismic factor
3
= 0.20, regardlessof the geographical location. In most cases, the vessel will havethicker shell and head material in the lower section. As anexample, consider a vessel 10 ft 0 in. diameter by
13
 / 
16
in
.
thick by190 ft 0 in. high which has an (
 L/D
) ratio of 19, and period of vibration (after being designed as a static structure) of 1.65 sec.This vessel, when designed as a dynamic structure by the methodof seismic analogy, resulted in a shell thickness of 
l3
 / 
16
in. for theupper 137 ft 0 in. and three 1ower sections consisting of 
7
 / 
8
,
15
 / 
16,
and 1-in. thick material (the supporting skirt increased from 1 to l
9
 / 
16
in.). The period of vibration was reduced to approximately 1.4sec.Whereas the application of this method actually consists of trialand error, the experienced pressure vessel designer becomes veryproficient in estimating how far down the vessel he can utilize thematerial thickness which is based on pressure-temperaturerequirements, as well as the length of successive sections of thicker material. It is usually unnecessary to carry the seismicanalogy into the design of the anchor bolts because this method is
Transactions of the ASME
(1)
wL E IgwL E Ig
        
23521785
41 241 2
 
. '.'
(5)
Pd SE P M d SE dSE 
4 0848
2
.
  
T x
wL D h
    
764 10
6
4312
.
T x
L D
wDh
   
   
764 10
6
21 2
.
0275 0307 0063 0125. . . .
0123 0307 0063 0125. . . .
 M F w y
3
' '
(2)
 
applied only as a "yardstick" to provide reasonable protection with aminimum amount of additional material. However, anchor boltstresses should be held low (15,000-16,000 psi) for these vessels or, if a higher stress is used, the design procedure outlined should beapplied to them. Proper tightening of anchor bolts for vessels subjectto dynamic behavior is of utmost importance and it is recommendedthat they should be pretightened to the predicted working stress toavoid stretching and loosening in service It is definitely unnecessaryto apply this method to the design of the foundation unless the vesselis operating in a seismic area.The design procedure just outlined produces consistent results
and
also provides additional material to resist the force due tomass-acceleration of the vessel in motion. A number of years ago,approximate calculations indicated that the total force due to windload plus the force due to mass acceleration was about 1.5 to 1.70times the static force due to 30 lb/ft, wind
load
for several differentsize vessels. It
was
found that the recommended design procedureresulted in shell thicknesses within a few thousandths of an inch of those obtained by the more lengthy approximation. Many criticalvessels have been successfully installed which were designed to theseismic analogy method just described.The same company that produced the first graph of equation (4)tentatively recommended the seismic design method using a 0.20seismic factor for their vessels requiring dynamic design in order to beon the "safe side." Since this company was mainly interested in theresponse of vessels and other structures to earthquake induced
Journal of Engineering for Industry
Natural period of vibration Earthquake coefficientLess than 0.40 sec 0.200.40 sec to 1.0 sec 0.08 divided by periodGreater than 1 sec 0.08Attention is again called to the fact that this paper is primarilyconcerned with vibrations induced by wind or other forces whichoccur more frequently than earthquakes and it should be noted that thevessel reported as Case II under Field Data is well within the laterrecommendations outlined here and vibration trouble was encountered.It is agreed that the current practice is probably adequate forearthquake design; however, all critical vessels (except the vesselreported as Case II) designed and installed by our company have beendesigned to the seismic analogy method using a 0.20 seismic factor.Not all vessels designed as static structures have the same thicknessof shell for their entire length and some vessels are of more than onediameter. These vessels, as well as many designed as dynamicstructures cannot have their period of vibration estimated from thegraph in Fig. 1 or equation (4). It is also desirable to know the changein the vibration period resulting from dynamic design. Of the severalmethods referred to in reference books on vibration [1, 2, 3] thenumerical integration of the equation
FEBRUARY I 959 / 79
vibration, they later revised their recommendations as follows:Fig. 1

Activity (17)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads
friend210 liked this
rydnbok liked this
cds_26 liked this
vishnushayan liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->