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Dies Fasti - Understanding the Fastened Sculptures

Dies Fasti - Understanding the Fastened Sculptures

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Published by jwr47
Understanding religion may help us to survive in the turbulent years of our life. This document illuminates some of the ancient customs, which may be known to scholars but remain hidden in the old and worn out books, paintings and sculptures.

The Lusty Man sculpture of Boa Island in Northern Ireland seems to consist of a woman and a man, fastened together back to back by a solid band.

Although the leather band does not include the arms the hands of these persons do seem to be tightened by shackles and they may be unable to free themselves. Other fastened sculptures may be interpreted as shackled individuals according to similar rules.

In fact shackles and ties seem to depict the essential idea of religion, fastening people in an ordered society. Law and order need to be renewed each year to protect society against disorder. The renewal procedures have been recorded from the very ancient eras up to modern times. A major contribution in disciplining the people has been delivered by the calendar system as invented by most advanced civilizations. The calendar always started as a religious project to be manipulated by the wise and mighty men. This manuscript will describe a number of illustrative symbols for rigid fastening and the corresponding but shorter periodical releases, which of course had been prescribed by the calendars.

The most important and famous unfastening festival seems to be the modern Carnival, which succeeded the Roman Saturnalia. Originally the carnival prepared the people for the rigid fast-season, which is the most efficient way of disciplining the individuals.
Nowadays the religious effects are dwindling, but a number of etymological and religious symbols remain.

This manuscripts documents the ties found in ancient sculptures and compares these shackles with the etymological symbols and other religious elements in social customs.
Understanding religion may help us to survive in the turbulent years of our life. This document illuminates some of the ancient customs, which may be known to scholars but remain hidden in the old and worn out books, paintings and sculptures.

The Lusty Man sculpture of Boa Island in Northern Ireland seems to consist of a woman and a man, fastened together back to back by a solid band.

Although the leather band does not include the arms the hands of these persons do seem to be tightened by shackles and they may be unable to free themselves. Other fastened sculptures may be interpreted as shackled individuals according to similar rules.

In fact shackles and ties seem to depict the essential idea of religion, fastening people in an ordered society. Law and order need to be renewed each year to protect society against disorder. The renewal procedures have been recorded from the very ancient eras up to modern times. A major contribution in disciplining the people has been delivered by the calendar system as invented by most advanced civilizations. The calendar always started as a religious project to be manipulated by the wise and mighty men. This manuscript will describe a number of illustrative symbols for rigid fastening and the corresponding but shorter periodical releases, which of course had been prescribed by the calendars.

The most important and famous unfastening festival seems to be the modern Carnival, which succeeded the Roman Saturnalia. Originally the carnival prepared the people for the rigid fast-season, which is the most efficient way of disciplining the individuals.
Nowadays the religious effects are dwindling, but a number of etymological and religious symbols remain.

This manuscripts documents the ties found in ancient sculptures and compares these shackles with the etymological symbols and other religious elements in social customs.

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Published by: jwr47 on Feb 18, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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10/20/2010

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Joannes Richter 
Dies Fasti
 Fig. 1: Lusty Man Odin - Boa Island (Northern Island)
 
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Joannes Richter
Dies Fasti
Understanding the Fastened Sculptures
Published by Lulu
-2009-3

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