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Kukharenko a Book of Practice in Stylistics-108

Kukharenko a Book of Practice in Stylistics-108

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stylistics
stylistics

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06/13/2013

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Кухаренко В.А.
Практикум з стилістики англійської мови: Підручник. – Вінниця.«Нова книга», 2000 - 160 с.
CONTENTS
FOREWORD...............................................................................…………………………………………... 2PRELIMINARY REMARKS.....................................................………………………………………….. 3CHAPTER I. PHONO-GRAPHICAL LEVEL. MORPHOLOGICAL LEVEL…............................... 13
Sound Instrumenting. Craphon. Graphical Means…………………………………………………………...6Morphemic Repetition. Extension of Morphemic Valency………………………………………………….11
CHAPTER II. LEXICAL LEVEL..............................................……………………………………….…14
Word and its Semantic Structure…………………………………………………………………………….14
Connotational Meanings of a Word 
………………………………………………………………………….14
The Role of the Context in the Actualization of Meaning…
………………………………………………….14Stylistic Differentiation of the Vocabulary…………………………………………………………………..16
 Literary Stratum of Words. Colloquial Words…..
…………………………………………………………..16Lexical Stylistic Devices…………………………………………………………………………………….23
Metaphor. Metonymy. Synecdoche. Play on Words. Irony. Epithet 
…………………………………………23
 Hyperbole. Understatement. Oxymoron.
……………………………………………………………………23
CHAPTER III. SYNTACTICAL LEVEL..................................…………………………………………38
Main Characteristics of the Sentence. Syntactical SDs. Sentence Length…………………………………..38
One-Word Sentences. Sentence Structure. Punctuation. Arrangement of Sentence Members. Rhetorical Question. Types of Repetition. Parallel Constructions. Chiasmus. Inversion. Suspense, Detachment.Completeness of Sentence Structure. Ellipsis. One-Member Sentences. Apokoinu Constructions. Break.
Types of Connection.
 Polysyndeton. Asyndeton. Attachment 
Lexico-Syntactical Stylistic Devices.
 Antithesis. Climax. Anticlimax. Simile. Litotes. Periphrasis.
CHAPTER IV. TYPES OF NARRATION………………………………………………………………57
 Author's Narrative. Dialogue. Interior Speech. Represented 
………………………………………………57
Speech. Compositional Forms.
……………………………………………….……………………………57
CHAPTER V. FUNCTIONAL STYLES ………………………………………………………………..61
Colloquial vs. Literary Type of Communication. Oral vs
…………………….…….………………………61
Written Form of Communication.
…………………………………………….……………………………61
SUPPLEMENT 1………………………………………………………………………………………….69
Samples of Stylistic Analysis.
SUPPLEMENT2………………………………………………………………………………………….71
Extracts for Comprehensive Stylistic Analysis
LIST OF AUTHORS WHOSE TEXTSWERE USED IN EXERCISES
 
 
FOREWORD
Seminars in Style
is a book of practice which can be used alongside or after the theoretical course of English Stylistics. Its aim is to help students acquire and use the knowledge and techniques necessary for thestylistic analysis of a text, i.e. find and interpret language phenomena of different levels of the languagestructure, which carry some additional information of the emotive, logical or evaluative types, all serving toenrich, deepen and clarify the text.The book is divided into five chapters, each one containing a brief theoretical survey, questionschecking the students' comprehension, and exercises. The latter are excerpts of varying length taken from the prose of XIX-XX cc. written in English. The length and complexity of the fragments for analysis grow by theend of each chapter. A sample of analysis is offered at the end of the book.There are also texts for comprehensive stylistic analysis presupposing understanding of and freeorientation in the material of the previous chapters.The book ends with a list of the authors, whose works have been used for illustration.
2
 
PRELIMINARY REMARKSMain Trends in Style Study. Functional Stylistics and Functional Styles. Forms and Types of theLanguage. Stylistics of Artistic Speech. Individual Style Study. Decoding Stylistics. Practical Stylistics.Levels of Linguistic Analysis. Foregrounding. Aims of Stylistic Analysis.
The term "stylistics" originated from the Greek "stylos", which means, "a pen".-In the course of time itdeveloped several meanings, each one applied to a specific study of language elements and their use in speech.It is no news that any propositional content - any "idea" - can be verbalized in several different ways.So, "May I offer you a chair?", "Take a seat, please", "Sit down" - have the same proposition (subject matter) but differ in the manner of expression, which, in its turn, depends upon the situational conditions of thecommunication act.70 per cent of our lifetime is spent in various forms of communication activities - oral (speaking,listening) or written (reading, writing), so it is self-evident how important it is for a philologist to know themechanics of relations between the non-verbal, extralinguistic, cognitive essence of the communicative act andits verbal, linguistic presentation. It is no surprise, then, that many linguists follow their famous Frenchcolleague Charles Bally, claiming that Stylistics is primarily the study of synonymic language resources.Representatives of the not less well-known Prague school -V.Mathesius, T.Vachek, J.Havranek andothers focused their attention on the priority of the situational appropriateness in the choice of languagevarieties for their adequate functioning. Thus
 , functional stylistics,
which became and remains an international,very important trend in style study, deals with sets, "paradigms" of language units of all levels of languagehierarchy serving to accommodate the needs of certain typified communicative situations. These paradigms areknown as
 functional styles
 
of the language. Proceeding from the famous definition of the style of a languageoffered by V.V.Vinogradov more than half a century ago, we shall follow the understanding of a functionalstyle formulated by I. R. Galperin as "a system of coordinated, interrelated and interconditioned languagemeans intended to fulfil a specific function of communication and aiming at a definite effect."All scholars agree that a well developed language, such as English, is streamed into several functionalstyles. Their classifications, though, coincide only partially: most style theoreticians do not argue about thenumber of functional styles being five, but disagree about their nomenclature. This manual offers one of therather widely accepted classifications which singles out the following functional styles:1.
official style,
represented in all kinds of official documents and papers;2.
scientific style,
found in articles, brochures, monographs and other scientific and academic publications;3.
 publicist style,
covering such genres as essay, feature article, most writings of "new journalism", public speeches, etc.;4.
newspaper style,
observed in the majority of information materials printed in newspapers;5.
belles-lettres style,
embracing numerous and versatile genres of imaginative writing.It is only the first three that are invariably recognized in all stylistic treatises. As to the newspaper style,it is often regarded as part of the publicist domain and is not always treated individually. But the biggestcontroversy is flaming around the
belles-lettres style.
The unlimited possibilities of creative writing, whichcovers the whole of the universe and makes use of all language resources, led some scholars to the convictionthat because of the liability of its contours, it can be hardly qualified as a functional style. Still others claim that,regardless of its versatility, the
belles-lettres style,
in each of its concrete representations, fulfils the aestheticfunction, which fact singles this style out of others and gives grounds to recognize its systematic uniqueness,i.e. charges it with the status if an autonomous functional style. To compare different views on the number of functional styles and their classification see corresponding chapters in stylistic monographs, reference- andtextbooks.Each of the enumerated styles is exercized in two forms -
written
and
oral:
an article and a lecture areexamples of the two forms of the scientific style; news broadcast on the radio and TV or newspaper informationmaterials - of the newspaper style; an essay and a public speech - of the publicist style, etc.The number of functional styles and the principles of their differentiation change with time and reflectthe state of the functioning language at a given period. So, only recently, most style classifications had alsoincluded the so-called
 poetic
style which dealt with verbal forms specific for poetry. But poetry, within the lastdecades, lost its isolated linguistic position; it makes use of all the vocabulary and grammar offered by thelanguage at large and there is hardly sense in singling out a special poetic style for the contemporary linguisticsituation, though its relevance for the language of the seventeenth, eighteenth and even the biggest part of the
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