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2006 NAHJ Magazine Report

2006 NAHJ Magazine Report

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Published by nahjorg
This study serves as a benchmark assessing Latino-related coverage in U.S. news magazines for 2005. The study evaluated Time, Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report’s coverage of Latinos by looking at the ways in which the three leading U.S. news magazines covered Latinos.
This study serves as a benchmark assessing Latino-related coverage in U.S. news magazines for 2005. The study evaluated Time, Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report’s coverage of Latinos by looking at the ways in which the three leading U.S. news magazines covered Latinos.

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Published by: nahjorg on Feb 22, 2010
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U.S. NEWS MAGAZINE COVERAGE OF LATINOS:2006 REPORT
THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HISPANIC JOURNALISTS AND ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY’SWALTER CRONKITE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AND MASS COMMUNICATION PRESENT
JUNE 2006
 
Report Prepared for theNational Association of Hispanic JournalistsDina Gavrilos, Ph.D.Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass CommunicationArizona State UniversityAn Analysis of the Portrayal of Latinosin the Nation’s Three Leading News Magazines in 2005
 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The National Association of Hispanic Journalists would like to thank the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism andMass Communication at Arizona State University for producing an excellent report that we believe established a solidbaseline for future research on the coverage of Latinos by our nation’s leading news magazines.We look forward to working with ASU again on future projects that further examine issues affecting newsroom diversity.We want to especially thank Christopher Callahan, the dean of the Walter Cronkite School, for providing funding forthis report; ASU’s Dina Gavrilos, Ph.D., the author of this study; and Marianne Barrett, Ph.D., associate dean foracademic affairs at the Cronkite School.We also want to thank ASU students Sonu Munshi and Jake Geller, as well undergraduate student Melody Rodriguez,for their work on this study.NAHJ would also like to thank Rafael Olmeda, the association’s vice president of print, who proposed that NAHJauthorize a study on the coverage of Latinos by the country’s leading news magazines. We also want to thank him forproviding personal funding for the printing of this report.We would like to thank Daniela Montalvo, communication and research coordinator for NAHJ, and Joseph Torres,NAHJ deputy director, for their help in editing and guiding this report. Finally, NAHJ would like to thank FedericoSubervi, Ph.D., for his guidance.
 
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MESSAGE FROM NAHJ
The National Association of Hispanic Journalists has produced a
Network Brownout Report 
for more than10 years, analyzing the way Hispanics are portrayed on national newscasts. We have long wanted todevelop a companion to that report that examines print media, but it has always been a major challenge.Would we only look at the top 10 newspapers in terms of circulation? Would we randomly select oneweek for extensive review? And most importantly, would we be telling a national story?It wasn’t until last year that we took the idea and decided to apply it to the three major national newsmagazines.
Time, Newsweek 
and
U.S. News & World Report 
seek to be agenda setters in the UnitedStates. The three publications have a unique opportunity to bring stories to all Americans. It’s timeit’spast time — to ask whether they are fully and fairly telling the story of Hispanic America. Would we seeHispanics as part of the fabric of the United States, or as a threat to it? Would the average reader ofthese three publications walk away with a positive, negative or neutral opinion of the largest minoritypopulation in the United States?My personal thanks go to NAHJ President Verónica Villafañe and the rest of the association’s board ofdirectors, as well as the staff, for their support in the development of this project. I also want to thankArizona State University for taking it on.The board of directors of NAHJ entered this project with an open mind. Although it would be acompanion to the Network Brownout Report, we never used the word “brownout” to describe it. Wewanted an honest content audit, not a “hit piece” with a predetermined outcome.But now the results are in.In future years, we hope coverage of the Hispanic community will improve. But first, the publishers ofthese magazines need to work to change these results.Thank you.Rafael OlmedaVice President of PrintNational Association of Hispanic Journalists

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